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Author: Patrick Blannin
One of the most dominant security issues of the twenty-first century has been the US led battle against transnational terrorism – the aptly named Long War. Over the past fifteen years the Long War has been examined using multiple perspectives. However, one central mechanism is missing in current Long War analyses: defence diplomacy. Defence diplomacy enhances the diplomatic and security capacity of a state, providing the only link between executive office and the ministries of foreign affairs and defence, two vital institutions in the Long War. Using a case study of US defence diplomacy in Afghanistan from 2001 to 2014, the paper argues simply that the practice of defence diplomacy far outweighs current theories on what it is, how it works and why it matters. The paper aims to generate a more nuanced understanding of defence diplomacy, as well as identify it as a key component of the US CT/COIN strategy to achieve their Long War policy objectives.
Author: Peter Goodrich
Taking as its exemplum the use of images in judicial decisions, this article argues that the ratio decidendi of legal precedent should be supplemented with the imago decidendi, the figure or depiction that motivates judgment. Drawing upon the history of legal humanism, and particularly the tradition of juristic emblems, it is argued that an adequate understanding of case law rules and decisions requires attention to the imagery that conceives and propels the reasoned deliberation that follows. To adequately apprehend the transmission of law in a digital age requires acknowledging that images think differently, that the ambulation of the eye in the image is very different to the linear glance of the text.
Technological, Political and Social Drivers of Change
What is behind the changing attitudes towards intellectual property in India and China? This exploration of empirically-based research comparisons on the character of intellectual property systems found in these two countries, offers answers to three key questions: what are the drivers that have moved them towards a closer embrace of IP norms, how have domestic and systemic influences shaped the character of this embrace, and how have state and non-state actors interacted within the international system to promote this transformation? Focusing on the software and IT services industries, it illuminates the policy drivers that have influenced IP regime adoption, and helps our understanding the process by providing a clear framework of distinctive phases of technological, political and social development.
This basic guide to intellectual property law, from the point of view of international commerce, clearly demarcates the ground on which any contract involving intellectual property must be based. It describes and analyzes the legally valid guidelines by which any commercial entity may:

facilitate the sale of a protected product in foreign markets;
prevent the use of protected property by competitors at home and abroad; and
forestall the manufacture abroad of identical or misleadingly similar items.
The author considers both the variety of national requirements and the international intellectual property regime that is now in place under the WTO/GATT, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), and multilateral treaties. In connection with both technology and proprietary information, emphasis is on the need to determine, on a country-by-country basis:


which "ideas" are subject to intellectual property protection;
which "persons" can seek and obtain intellectual property protection;
which special use permits may apply; and
which technical requirements must be met.
Basics of International Intellectual Property Law is a fundamental resource for any business person or counsel considering entry into foreign markets. The information and guidance it provides is easy to understand and use, and will help any cross-border business venture to proceed smoothly and successfully.



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