Browse results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 121 items for :

  • Art History x
  • Upcoming Publications x
  • Just Published x
  • Status (Books): Published x
Clear All
Author: Hugh Ridley
This book analyses Darwin’s influence on art and the effect of his science on experiences of beauty. The first chapter discusses Darwin’s great forerunner, Alexander von Humboldt, and his contribution to thinking about the relationship between science and beauty. The second examines the public reception of Darwin in Germany, focusing on the German Naturalists and the important scientific controversies which Darwin’s idea provoked. It shows the political use of science (Häckel and Virchow) and foreshadows present-day debates between Darwinism and Creationism, science and an idealized view of nature.
Against this background the book shows the effect of Darwin on three important fields: the perception of landscape in major writers (Zola, Lawrence, Jacobsen, Benn and Brecht) before 1920; the portrayal of wild life, as revealed in bird-painting; and the understanding of the relationship between the human body and character.
The book brings together for the first time Darwin’s The Expression of Emotion with the work of major European novelists (Eliot, Gutzkow and Freytag), focusing on the place of the older understandings contained in physiognomy, which Darwin challenged, on the portrayal of ethnicity, and on debates about acting, including for the young Brecht.
The Practice of Non-Duality
Focusing on the most definition-resistant art movement in history and departing from its two chief characteristics: intermediality and interactivity, this book develops an original theory of practice, the experiential philosophy of non-duality, which is the philosophy of dynamic co-constitutivity. This is done by tracing the performativity of intermedial works – works that fall conceptually between the art and the life media, such as Bengt af Klintbergs’s event score: “Eat an orange as if it were an apple” – in five key areas of human experience: language, temporality, the sensorium, social rites and rituals, and systems of economic exchange. The main argument, woven with the aid of the Derridian blind tactics, the Gramscian production of social life and the Zen-derived interexpression of Kitaro Nishida, is that the practical philosophy of co-constitutivity arises from the logic of the intermedium. In pursuing this argument, the book does three things: (1) it theorises an oeuvre that has remained under-theorised due to its fundamentally non-discursive nature and in doing so reinstates Fluxus as an influential cultural, rather than a “merely” artistic paradigm; (2) it serves as a companion to thinking by doing since most Fluxus intermedia are ready-mades, and, as such, readily available in the everyday environment; and (3) it establishes the counter-hegemonic logic of fluxing while tracing its legacy in contemporary practices as diverse as the culture-jamming activism of The Yes Men, the paradoxical performance work of Song Dong and the pervasive game worlds of Blast Theory.
Editor: Carole Edwards
Les littératures francophones postcoloniales portent l’empreinte de la douleur, du compromis ou encore de l’oubli, notions qui transparaissent dans celle du sacrifice. Dans ce collectif, les auteurs se penchent sur différentes représentations et fonctions du sacrifice dans le roman, le théâtre, la nouvelle, et le film antillais, haïtien, africain et québécois. L’étude déploie la diversité, tant dans le ton que la forme, du sacrifice dans des régions géographiques diverses et selon des esthétiques variées. Qu’il s’agisse du sacrifice au sens propre ou de l’artifice, la notion demeure riche en interprétations et traduit le caractère unique des littératures francophones. Don de soi ou don de l’autre, l’étude du sacrifice nous permet de comprendre l’Histoire d’hommes et de femmes pris dans le tourbillon de leur culture respective face au « destin ».
Over the period 1999-2005, choreographer and dancer Tess de Quincey and a team of international artists conducted a series of art-laboratories and performances in and around the Central Desert town of Alice Springs. These art-labs culminated in the 2005 performance of Dictionary of Atmospheres, staged during the Alice Desert Festival. Drawing upon practice-based research conducted while interning with de Quincey during the development and staging of Dictionary of Atmospheres, Anderson contemplates the way in which moments from the production illustrate the artist’s approach to and articulation of place. Meeting Places offers meditation on the nature of experience as it manifests in serial site-specific art encounters in desert locations.
The essays collected here raise a simple but rarely asked question: just what, exactly, is voice? From this founding question, many others proliferate: Is voice an animal category, as Aristotle thought? Or is it distinctively human? Is it essentially related to language? To music? To song and singing? Is it a mark of presence or of absence? Is it a kind of object? How is our sense of voice affected by the development of recording technology? The authors in this volume approach such questions primarily by turning away from a general idea of voice and instead investigating what can be learned by attending to the qualities and acts of particular voices. The range is wide: from Poe’s “Leigeia” to Woolf’s The Waves, from Jussi Björling to Waltraud Meier, from song to oratorio to opera and beyond. Throughout, consistent with the volume’s origin in papers delivered at the eighth biennial meeting of the International Association for Word and Music Studies, the role of voice in joining or separating words and music is paramount. These studies address key topics in musicology, literary criticism, philosophy, aesthetics, and performance studies, and will also appeal to practicing musicians.
The volume aims to be a reference work for all researchers interested in the study of fictional dialogue and its translation in suspense novels and films as well as in related genres. The volume also aims to determine the interplay between the creation of suspense and fictional dialogue. The particular interest in dialogue comes from the host of roles it plays in fiction. It helps create suspense and arouses a whole range of feelings in the reader or the audience related to the development of the plot.
Fictional dialogue is the discursive method of evoking orality, conferring authenticity and credibility on a plot and giving fictional characters a voice. As a narrative strategy, dialogue is an important resource that enables the writer to shape the character’s subjectivity. In thrillers the characters’ voice is part of the process of creating suspense, an element of uncertainty, anxiety and excitement, which is not exclusive to this genre. To clearly differentiate suspense from the tension created by other types of fiction, this volume aims to study the relationship between the characters’ voices and the building of suspense and to describe the translation difficulties arising from this particular interdependence.
This is the first collection in English devoted exclusively to pragmatist aesthetics. Its main aim is to employ the resources of that rich and exciting tradition in studying artistic phenomena such as film, sculpture, bio-art, poetry, the novel, cuisine, and various body arts. But it also attempts to provide a wider background for such studies by sketching the history of pragmatist reflection on the aesthetic and by discussing some of the main positions that this history has produced: the aesthetic conceptions of C.S. Peirce, William James, John Dewey, Joseph Margolis, Richard Shusterman (somaesthetics in particular), and others.
This volume focuses on the contribution of German-speaking refugees from Nazism to the performing arts in Britain, evaluating their role in broadcasting, theatre, film and dance from 1933 to the present. It contains essays evaluating the role of refugee artists in the BBC German Service, including the actor Martin Miller, the writer Bruno Adler and the journalist Edmund Wolf. Miller also made a career in the English theatre transcending the barrier of language, as did the actor Gerhard Hinze, whose transition to the English stage is an instructive example of adaptation to a new theatre culture. In film, language problems were mitigated by the technical possibilities of the medium, although stars like Anton Walbrook received coaching in English. Certainly, technicians from Central Europe, like the cameraman Wolf Suschitzky, helped establish the character of British film in the 1950s and 1960s. In dance theatre, language played little role, facilitating the influence in Britain of dance practitioners like Kurt Jooss and Sigurd Leeder. Finally, evaluating the reverse influence of émigrés on Germany, two essays discuss Erich Fried’s translations of Shakespeare and Peter Zadek’s early theatre career in Germany.
Philosophical and Axiological Studies on the Avant-Garde, Pragmatism, and Postmodernism
The book presents five philosophical and axiological studies devoted to the relationship between aesthetics and politics. It shows this relationship throughout the works of some avant-gardists, pragmatists, and postmodernists. It is also a voice in the discussion about the meaning of the fine arts and aesthetics in the context of the political aims and norms. This voice claims that the political dimension of art and aesthetics should be studied much more seriously than it has been till today, and needs more courageous re-interpretations and re-readings.
The Hidden Christ in Western Art since 1960
In this book Martien Brinkman explores the Jesus incognito as found in Western film, literature, and the visual arts since 1960. His interest here is focused primarily on indirect references to the Jesus figure. To his surprise, he found an abundance of allusions to Jesus in key figures in modern art. This confirmed his view that film, literature, and the visual arts make a substantial contribution, even in secular Western culture, to continuing reflection on Jesus’ significance.
Brinkman finds important characteristics of a hidden Christ in films by Gabriel Axel, Ingmar Bergman, Krzysztof Kieslowski, and Lars von Trier, novels by Peter De Vries, J.M. Coetzee, and Arnon Grunberg, poems by Les Murray and Czeslaw Milosz, and paintings by Andy Warhol, Harald Duwe, and Frans Franciscus. He defines a hidden Christ as a fictional human individual who can be seen as a new embodiment of the meaning that can be attributed in the present to the biblical figure of Jesus. The hidden Christ is therefore a contemporized Jesus figure.
This book will be of interest for everyone who shares Brinkman’s quest for this Jesus incognito.