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A Decolonizing Approach to Community-Based Action Research
Many community health interventions fail, wasting tax dollars and human resources. These interventions are typically designed by subject matter experts who don’t have direct experience with the local community. In contrast, successful interventions are built from the ground up, planned and implemented by the people that will benefit from them, using community-based action research. Researching With: A Decolonizing Approach to Community-Based Action Research is a guide for how to do research that is inclusive, engages in community-building, and implements a decolonizing framework. This text advocates for a collaborative approach, researching with communities, rather than conducting research on them. Reviewing both theory and method, Jessica Smartt Gullion and Abigail Tilton offer practical tips for forming community partnerships and building coalitions. Researching With also includes helpful information about incorporating community work into a successful academic career. This book can be used as supplemental or primary reading in courses in sociology, social work, health research, nursing, public health, qualitative inquiry, and research methods, and is also of value to individual researchers and graduate students writing their thesis.
The Joker both fascinates and repels us. From his origin in Detective Comics in 1940, he has committed obscene crimes, some of the worst the Batman universe has ever known, and, conversely, fans have made him the topic of erotic and pornographic “fan fiction.” Speculation about the Joker abounds, where some fans have even claimed that the Joker is “queer coded.” This work explores various popular claims about the Joker, and delves into the history of comic books, and of other popular media from a semiotic viewpoint to understand “The Clown Prince of Crime” in the contexts in which he existed to understand his evolution in the past. From his roots as a “typical hoodlum,” The Joker even starred in his own eponymous comic book series and he was recently featured in a non-canonical movie. This work examines what it is about the Joker which fascinates us.
In Nonprofit Finance: A Synthetic Review Thad D. Calabrese reviews the current state of research on nonprofit finance. The book comprehensively addresses core finance topics with a focus on those issues that differentiate nonprofit finance from traditional finance. Topics include the financial goals of nonprofits, sources and uses of funds, reserves and working capital, and debt and borrowing. The text also addresses recent innovations in nonprofit finance such as crowdsourcing donations, social impact bonds, flexible low yield paper, and donor-advised funds, as well as innovations in corporate forms. Throughout the text, gaps in our current knowledge are highlighted and avenues for future research are suggested. As such, Nonprofit Finance: A Synthetic Review is relevant for researchers and practitioners alike.
This text explores the re-assertion of right-wing populist and fascist ideologies as presented and distributed in the media. In particular, attacks on immigrants, women, minorities, and LGBTQI people are increasing, inspired by the election of politicians who openly support authoritarian discourse and scapegoating. More troubling is how this discourse is inscribed into laws and policies.

Despite the urgency of the situation, the Left has been unable to effectively respond to these events, from liberals insisting on hands-off free speech policies, including covering "both sides of the issue" to socialists who utilize a tunnel vision focus on economic issues at the expense of women and minorities. In order to effectively resist right-wing movements of this magnitude, a socialist/Marxist feminist analysis is necessary for understanding how racism, sexism, and homophobia are conduits for capitalism, not just ‘identity issues.’

Topics addressed in this text include an overview of dialectical materialist feminism and its relevance and a review of characteristics of authoritarian populism and fascism. Additionally, the insistence on a colorblind conceptualization of the working class is critiqued, with its detrimental effects on moving resistance and activism forward. This was a key weakness with the Bernie Sanders campaign, which is discussed. Online environments and their alt-right discourse/function are used as an example of the ineffectiveness of e-libertarianism, which has prioritized hands-off administration, allowing right-wing discourse to overcome many online spaces. Other topics include the emergence of the fetal personhood construct in response to abortion rights, and the rejection of science and expertise.
Temples and Communities
Based on long-term ethnographic study, this is the first comprehensive work on the Chinese popular religion in Malaysia. It analyses temples and communities in historical and contemporary perspective, the diversity of deities and Chinese speech groups, religious specialists and temple services, the communal significance of the Hungry Ghosts Festival, the relationship between religion and philanthropy as seen through the lens of such Chinese religious organization as shantang (benevolent halls) and Dejiao (Moral Uplifting Societies), as well as the development and transformation of Taoist Religion. Highly informative, this concise book contributes to an understanding of Chinese migration and settlement, political economy and religion, religion and identity politics as well the significance of religion to both individuals and communities.
Decolonialities, Spiritualities, and Identities
Automatization and systematic exclusion are beyond common sense within U.S. public schools. The failure to address social problems spills over to schools where youth who refuse to conform to the broken system are labelled as deviant and legitimately excluded. Students who conform are made real by the system and allowed back into society to keep manufacturing the same inequalities. This is the Pinocchio Effect. It involves the legitimization of hegemonic knowledge and the oppression of bodies, mind, and spiritualities. The book analyzes the impact of colonialities within U.S. public education by examining the learning experiences that influence teachers’ and students’ spiritualties, affecting the construction and oppression of their identities. Consequently, the author examines how educators can decolonize the classroom, which functions as a political arena as well as a critical space of praxis in order to reveal how realities and knowledges are made nonexistent—an epistemic blindness and privilege.
Grandparents, Grandchildren, Schools, Communities, and Churches
This book presents nuanced small-scale studies and reflective essays, and is about voices of contemporary grandparents and grandchildren living in the State of Hawai'i which is rapidly going through economic, social, educational, and cultural transformation ushered in by forces of globalization and McDonaldization of society.

Hawai‘i is generally known as a great tourist destination that is no less than an imagined paradise. Hawai‘i is more than solely a site for tourism; it has a culturally and socially diverse population, and has a contested social history. In this context, in a deeper sense, the book gives the reader glimpses of family members at the level of intimacy among themselves in their place based situated interactions in today’s Hawai‘i. In its real essence, this book is an authentic collection of research papers, short stories, anecdotes, memories and reminiscences; of aloha (love, compassion, kindness) and mahalo (thanks, respect, and praise); of longing and search for legacy by diasporic elders, immigrants, settlers, American citizens, hyphenated Americans, Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders; by grandparents and grandchildren of diverse and multiple ethnicities, cultures, and races who have struggled hard through many decades to make Hawai‘i their permanent and beloved home and place, or long-term residence to live and raise their families.

The set of self-narratives in this book may have significant implications for understanding the process of aging in the State of Hawai'i; for social aging is both an individual and a social process in the sense that an individual’s biography is intimately related to her/his society’s biography. For “doing” roles such as being grandparents and grandchildren are heavily defined and structured by prevailing social and cultural processes.

The book may be useful for educators and students who are working and studying in areas such as education, sociology of family, social work, local and global social change, indigenous cultures and societies, alternative modernities and indigenizing social movements, race and ethnic relations, settler societies, social justice, health care, social gerontology, diaspora and immigration studies, and those working with youth in communities.
Film follows three women who moved to Los Angeles to pursue their dreams. Tash Daniels aspires to be a filmmaker. Her short film was rejected from festivals, she has a stack of rejected grant proposals, and she lost her internship at a studio when her boss harassed her, forcing her to take a job as a personal shopper. Lu K is a hot deejay slowly working her way up the club scene, but no one is doing her any favors. Fiercely independent, she’s at a loss when she meets Paisley, a woman who captures her heart. Monroe Preston is the glamorous wife of a Hollywood studio head. As a teenager she moved to LA in search of a “big” life, but now she wonders if reality measures up to fantasy. When a man in their circle finds sudden fame, each of these women is catapulted on a journey of self-discovery. As the characters’ stories unfold, each is forced to confront how her past has shaped her fears and to choose how she wants to live in the present. Film is a novel about the underside of dreams, the struggle to find internal strength, the power of art, and what it truly means to live a “big” life. Frequently shown bathed in the glow of the silver screen, the characters in Film show us how the arts can reignite the light within. With a tribute to popular culture, set against the backdrop of Tinseltown, Film celebrates how the art we make and consume can shape our stories, scene by scene. Although fictional, Film is loosely grounded in interview research. It can be read entirely for pleasure or used as supplemental reading in a variety of courses in women’s studies/gender studies, sociology, psychology, communication, popular culture, media studies, or qualitative inquiry. Film can be read as a stand-alone novel or as a sequel to the bestselling novel, Blue.
Stories of LGBTQ Relationships, Identities, and Desires
There has never been a more crucial time for an intimate and thorough examination of the ways in which sexuality informs people’s lives. In Living Sexuality: Stories of LGBTQ Relationships, Identities, and Desires, the authors use autoethnography and personal narrative to provide first-hand accounts of the connections between sexuality, particularly LGBTQ identities, and the everyday experiences of relationships. Each story also invites readers to understand how sexuality informs communication as it occurs within diverse cultural contexts. In addition, the stories often focus on taboo issues overlooked or ignored in mainstream research about sexuality. Discussion questions appear at the end of each story that should stimulate engagement by students, instructors, and researchers.
Multiple forms of oppression, injustice, and violence today have roots in histories of colonialism. This connection to the past feels familiar for some and less relevant for others. Understanding and responding to these connections is more crucial than ever, yet some resist rather than face this task directly. Others resist oppressive postcolonial conditions.

Using intercultural stories and pastoral care scholarship, this book charts pathways through five resistances (not me, not here, not now, not relevant, not possible) to awaken creative pastoral care in a postcolonial world. McGarrah Sharp recommends practices that everyone can do: believing in each other, revisiting how histories are taught, imagining more passable futures, heeding prophetic poets, and crossing borders with healthy boundaries.