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Edited by Peter Duffy, Christine Hatton and Richard Sallis

At a time when universities demand immediate and quantifiable impacts of scholarship, the voices of research participants become secondary to impact factors and the volume of research produced. Moreover, what counts as research within the academy constrains practices and methods that may more authentically articulate the phenomena being studied. When external forces limit methodological practices, research innovation slows and homogenizes.

This book aims to address the methodological, interpretive, ethical/procedural challenges and tensions within theatre-based research with a goal of elevating our field’s research practice and inquiry. Each chapter embraces various methodologies, positionalities and examples of mediation by inviting two or more leading researchers to interrogated each other’s work and, in so doing, highlighted current debates and practices in theatre-based research. Topics include: ethics, method, audience, purpose, mediation, form, aesthetics, voice, data generation, and research participants. Each chapter frames a critical dialogue between researchers that take multiple forms (dialogic interlude, research conversation, dramatic narrative, duologue, poetic exchange, etc.).

Australian Theatre after the New Wave

Policy, Subsidy and the Alternative Artist

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Julian Meyrick

In Australian Theatre after the New Wave, Julian Meyrick charts the history of three ground-breaking Australian theatre companies, the Paris Theatre (1978), the Hunter Valley Theatre (1976-94) and Anthill Theatre (1980-94). In the years following the controversial dismissal of Gough Whitlam’s Labor government in 1975, these ‘alternative’ theatres struggled to survive in an increasingly adverse economic environment. Drawing on interviews and archival sources, including Australia Council files and correspondence, the book examines the funding structures in which the companies operated, and the impact of the cultural policies of the period. It analyses the changing relationship between the artist and the State, the rise of a managerial ethos of ‘accountability’, and the growing dominance of government in the fate of the nation’s theatre. In doing so, it shows the historical roots of many of the problems facing Australian theatre today.

“This is an exceptionally timely book... In giving a history of Australian independent theatre it not only charts the amazing rise and strange disappearance of an energetic, radical and dynamically democratic artistic movement, but also tries to explain that rise and fall, and how we should relate to it now.”
Prof. Justin O’Connor, Monash University

“This study makes a significant contribution to scholarship on Australian theatre and, more broadly… to the global discussion about the vexed relationship between artists, creativity, government funding for the arts and cultural policy.”
Dr. Gillian Arrighi, The University of Newcastle, Australia

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Adrian Kiernander

This book about the work of actor director John Bell is essential reading for anyone interested in Australian theatre and in Shakespearean performance. Adrian Kiernander makes use of the Stage on Screen archive of Australian theatre with extensive video excerpts of performances, and lucidly explains how, for over five decades, Bell has revived and reinvented theatre in Australia with his interpretations of radical new drama and particularly his innovative approach to staging Shakespeare’s plays. This scholarly book reveals why Bell deserves the reputation as a ‘national living treasure’ and a giant of the Australian theatre. It presents a perspective on recent history and national identity through the achievements of theatre and its evolution over time. From carnivalesque to circus, tragedy to farce, Bell has created theatre that is dynamic, vibrant and politically aware and that continues to challenge and excite audiences.

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Edited by Elke Huwiler, Elisabeth Meyer and Arend Quak

Der Band enthält 13 Studien zum Schauspiel des Mittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit. Dabei werden einerseits theoretische Betrachtungen, etwa zum Unterschied zwischen Osterfeier und Osterspiel oder zur Bedeutung der Musik für die Spiele, vorgelegt. Andererseits wird auf spezifische Spiele eingegangen, wie etwa auf das Heidelberger Passionsspiel von 1514, das Lübener Osterspielfragment, das älteste schwedische Spiel 'De uno peccatore', das Theophilusspiel, das Berliner Weihnachtsspiel von 1589 und Sebastian Brants 'Tugent Spyl'. Aber auch die Rezeption der Komödien des Terenz, die Entwicklung des Fasnachtspiels, das Puppenspiel in den Bearbeitungen des Maugis d'Aigremont sowie der Inseldiskurs und dessen Einfluss etwa auf Shakespeares 'The Tempest' werden behandelt.

Die Beiträge stammen von Bernd Bastert, Bart Besamusca, Cornelia Herberichs, Johannes Janota, Cobie Kuné, Tanja Mattern, Volker Mertens, Christian Moser, Arend Quak, Werner Röcke, Eckehard Simon, Clara Strijbosch und Elke Ukena-Best.

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Maya Nanitchkova Öztürk

Corporeality: Emergent consciousness within its spatial dimensions develops our understanding of what we can experience through our bodies in relation to the space around us. Rather than considering architecture as being about manifestation and mediation of fixed meanings, the book focuses instead on architectural space as a field that envelopes us incessantly, intimately, and affectively. We are in immediate contact with that space, and the way we relate to it determines how we are able to grasp the realities of the social and material worlds around us.
This enquiry considers architectural space and its impact on and relation to us from a range of disciplines and perspectives, leading from space to sense and to sensibility. The theatre becomes a central point of reference on this journey, allowing us to understand how space “works” by linking concrete spatial conditions to corresponding “forms of experience”. It allows showing how the ways we feel, think, and act emerge from within the rich texture of the pre-conscious and non-contemplative. That texture is induced and nourished by our bodily encounters with space. Offering a view of how immediate experience is generated in the body, this book enhances empirical research into the links between space, body, experience and consciousness.

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Edited by Maria Francisca Vilches de Frutos, Pilar Nieva-de la Paz, José-Ramón López García and Manuel Aznar Soler

This volume deals with the commitment in the defense of egalitarian values by theatrical creators of the Spanish republican exile of 1939. Their innovative narrative and visual discourse offer models of masculinity and femininity that represent the change in gender paradigms derived from the rising leading role of women in the public sphere. The book approaches the potential differentiation of work produced by them in terms of sexual identity, especially in questions as maternity and conjugality, showing the position of society with regard to the professional women. It also explains the influence of the professional roles achieved by the republican Spanish women in the international scene –Mexico, France, Argentina, Cuba, Chile, El Salvador, Guatemala, Uruguay– thanks to their use of modern artistic languages in works located between Vanguard and Tradition. They were also known for their work in Cinema, Radio, Television, Pedagogy and Translation. All these fields let women creators and managers continue with their artistic labor in the republican exile. Without forgetting the links with the country of origin, they were the best ambassadors of those artistic vanguards that so influenced the modernization of ideological and esthetic discourse in Western societies.

Este volumen indaga sobre el compromiso en la defensa de valores igualitarios por parte de los creadores y creadoras teatrales del exilio republicano de 1939, cuyos innovadores discursos narrativos y visuales presentan unos modelos de masculinidad y feminidad representativos del cambio en los paradigmas de género acordes con el creciente protagonismo de las mujeres en la Esfera pública. Aborda la potencial diferenciación de sus realizaciones en relación con su identidad sexual, en especial en cuestiones como la maternidad y la conyugalidad, y la posición de la sociedad ante las mujeres profesionales. Trata asimismo de la influencia que tuvo la agencia femenina republicana en la escena internacional -México, Francia, Argentina, Cuba, Chile, El Salvador, Guatemala, Uruguay-, gracias a la modernidad de sus lenguajes expresivos, entre la Vanguardia y la Tradición, y a su trabajo en el Cine, la Radio, la Televisión, la Pedagogía o la Traducción, que permitió a estas creadoras y gestoras continuar su labor artística durante su exilio. Sin olvidar sus vínculos con su país de origen, fueron los mejores embajadores de aquellas vanguardias históricas que tanto influyeron en la modernización de los discursos ideológicos y estéticos de las sociedades occidentales.

Playing Culture

Conventions and Extensions of Performance

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Edited by Vicki Ann Cremona, Rikard Hoogland, Gay Morris and Willmar Sauter

Playing Culture represents one of the corner stones in the model of the Theatrical Event, as developed by the Working Group of the International Federation for Theatre Research (IFTR). In this volume, thirteen scholars contribute to illuminate the significance and possibilities of playing within the framework of theatrical events. Playing is understood as an essential part of theatrical communication, from acting on stage to events far from theatre buildings. The playfulness characterizing academic traditions sets the tone in the introduction, illustrating the four sections of the book: Theories, Expansions, Politics and Conventions. The theoretical chapters depart from the classical Homo Ludens and offer a number of new perspectives on what play and playing implies in today’s mediatized culture. The contributions to the second section on extensions, deal with playing in non-theatrical circumstances such as market places, passports and stock holders’ meetings. The third section on the politics of playing focuses on wood-chopping women, saints and youngsters in South African townships – all demonstrating their social and political ambitions and purposes. The last section returns to the stage on which performers intend to represent, respectively, themselves, Bunraku puppets or the audience. Playing appears in many forms and in many places and constitutes a basic principle of theatre and performance. This book touches upon important theoretical implications of playing and offers a wide range of historical and contemporary examples.
Playing Culture – Conventions and Extensions of Performance is the third book of the IFTR Working Group on The Theatrical Event. The first volume, entitled Theatrical Events – Borders Dynamics Frames was published in 2004, followed by Festivalising! Theatrical Events, Politics and Culture in 2007. The present volume continues to expand the vision of the Theatrical Event as a theory and model for the study of playing, theatre, performance and mediated events.

Staging Vice

A Study of Dramatic Traditions in Medieval and Sixteenth-Century England and the Low Countries

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Charlotte Steenbrugge

Characters representing various sins and vices became the stars of their respective theatrical traditions in the course of the late medieval and early modern period in both the Low Countries and England. This study assesses the importance of such characters, and especially the English Vice and Dutch sinnekens, for our understanding of medieval and sixteenth-century Dutch and English drama by charting diachronic developments and through synchronic comparisons. The analysis of the functions as well as theatrical and meta-theatrical aspects of these characters reveals how these plays were conditioned by their literary and social setting. It sheds invaluable light on the subtly divergent appreciation of the concept of drama in these two regions and on their different use of drama as a didactic tool. In a wider perspective this study also investigates how the moral plays and their negative characters reflect the changes in the intellectual and religious climate of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries.

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Edited by Richard Fotheringham and James Smith

Whether catching Australian theatre during the 2000s or catching up now, this volume provides the reader with an overview of the decade. It reveals how Australian theatre continues to reflect the major political and social concerns of our time. Each contribution explores an important area of Australian performance so that the volume provides crucial background and insightful analysis for current theatre practice. The contributions cover political theatre, Indigenous theatre, playwrights concerned with cultural identity, key Shakespearean productions, the impact of funding and arts policy on theatre, dramaturgy and innovative projects, leading directors on rehearsal processes, theatre for young people, regional theatre including the Northern Territory, and physical theatre and Circus Oz. The book confirms the consolidation of previous artistic achievement over the decade and identifies the emergence of new trends and creative practices.

The Legacy of Opera

Reading Music Theatre as Experience and Performance

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Edited by Dominic Symonds and Pamela Karantonis

The Legacy of Opera: Reading Music Theatre as Experience and Performance is the first volume in a series of books compiled by the Music Theatre Working Group of the International Federation for Theatre Research. The series explores the widening of the meaning of the term “music theatre” to reflect new ways of thinking about this creative practice beyond the genres circumscribed by discourses of theatre studies and musicology. Specifically it interrogates the experience of music theatre and its performance energies for contemporary audiences who engage with the emergence of new expressive idioms, new performative paradigms, new technologies and new ways of thinking. The Legacy of Opera considers some of the ways in which opera’s influence has informed our understanding of and approach to the musical stage, from the multiple perspectives of the ideological, historical, corporeal and artistic. With contributions from international scholars in music theatre, its chapters explore both canonic and experimental examples of music theatre, spanning a period from the seventeenth century to the present day.