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Modern Chinese Religion I (2 vols.)

Song-Liao-Jin-Yuan (960-1368 AD)

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Edited by Pierre Marsone and John Lagerwey

A follow-up to Early Chinese Religion (Brill, 2009-10), Modern Chinese Religion focuses on the third period of paradigm shift in Chinese cultural and religious history, from the Song to the Yuan (960-1368 AD). As in the earlier periods, political division gave urgency to the invention of new models that would then remain dominant for six centuries. Defining religion as “value systems in practice”, this multi-disciplinary work shows the processes of rationalization and interiorization at work in the rituals, self-cultivation practices, thought, and iconography of elite forms of Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism, as well as in medicine. At the same time, lay Buddhism, Daoist exorcism, and medium-based local religion contributed each in its own way to the creation of modern popular religion.
With contributions by Juhn Ahn, Bai Bin, Chen Shuguo, Patricia Ebrey, Michael Fuller, Mark Halperin, Susan Huang, Dieter Kuhn, Nap-yin Lau, Fu-shih Lin, Pierre Marsone, Matsumoto Kôichi, Joseph McDermott, Tracy Miller, Julia Murray, Ong Chang Woei, Fabien Simonis, Dan Stevenson, Curie Virag, Michael Walsh, Linda Walton, Yokote Yutaka, Zhang Zong

Buddhism in China

Collected Papers of Erik Zürcher

Series:

Erik Zürcher

Edited by Jonathan A. Silk

Buddhism in China gathers together for the first time the most central and influential papers of the great scholar of Chinese Buddhism, Erik Zürcher, presenting the results of his career-long profound studies following on the 1959 publication of his landmark The Buddhist Conquest of China. The translation and language of Buddhist scriptures in China, Buddhist interactions with Daoist traditions, the activities of Buddhists below elite social levels, continued interactions with Central Asia and lands to the west, and typological comparisons with Christianity are only some of the themes explored here. Presenting some of the most important studies on Buddhism in China, especially in the earlier periods, ever published, it will thus be of interest to a wide variety of readers.

Edited by Frederick Hok-ming Cheung and Ming-chiu Lai

Now distributed by Brill for The Chinese University Press.

Seven, diverse papers, written by ancient and medieval historians, are collected in this volume. These papers were presented at the academic conference "Politics and Religion in Ancient and Medieval Europe and Asia", organized by the Department of History and New Asia College of The Chinese University of Hong Kong in March 1996.
Although the papers vary widely in the region and time-span of coverage – from ancient Egypt, the early Roman Empire, Norman England, to medieval China, they have in common their concern about the relationship between politics and different religions – Christianity, Buddhism, Taoism and others – in ancient and medieval Europe and Asia, and the respective intellectual and cultural interactions.
Professor Mu-chou Poo in his paper explores the ancient Egyptian attitudes toward foreigners and foreign culture as an effort to understand Egyptian culture from a new perspective, and as a preliminary attempt to probe into the issues concerning the nature of ancient ethnicity and cultural consciousness. Professor Yen-zen Tsai's paper looks into the way the early Roman Empire treated mystery cults under its rule. Professor Ming-chiu Lai discusses the impact of a Buddhist ritual on Chinese religious culture between the second and sixth centuries. Professor Chi-tim Lai in his paper argues that some Taoist teachings advocated a new world order, but they were not the real force that provoked the rebellions during the Eastern Jin Dynasty. Professor Puay-peng Ho exhibits the political meanings of the imperial buildings in the Tang period and sheds light on the research about legitimacy in medieval China. Professor Warren Hollister's paper, which is also the keynote speech, points out that the high culture of twelfth century western Europe was largely the product of monastery. Finally, Professor Frederick Hok-ming Cheung examines the role of the Church in Anglo-Norman politics.
The book will furnish a basis for further investigation on politics and religion in the ancient and medieval world, and inspire scholarly inquiries into the comparative dimensions of these important historical phenomena. This volume is distributed by Brill for The Chinese University Press.