Eine Untersuchung anhand der Rechtsprechung der Römischen Rota
Das kirchliche Prozessrecht manifestiert sich in einem detailreichen Normenkomplex, der nur selten in den Blick wissenschaftlicher Untersuchung gerät. Grund genug, einigen Detailfragen Raum zu geben, die gleichzeitig paradigmatische Problemanzeigen für den gegenwärtigen Zustand kirchlicher Rechtskultur darstellen.Neben der eigentlichen Hauptsache können im kanonischen Prozess auch so genannte akzessorische Fragen auftreten, die von der Hauptsache abhängig sind, aber eine eigene richterliche Entscheidung verlangen. Die auf derartige Fragen fokussierte Untersuchung der Rechtsprechung der Römischen Rota offenbart einen höchst bedenklichen Zustand des geltenden Prozessrechts. Ist der Untergang des kanonischen Prozesses längst besiegelt?
Zum Verhältnis von Ästhetik und Religion in der Moderne
Ästhetische Formen sind Kristallisationspunkte kultureller, religiöser und politischer Konflikte. Dies gilt, sofern sie religiös determinierten und legitimierten Bedeutungssystemen angehören. Sie stehen im Horizont bestimmter Klassifikationsschemata, epistemischer Unterscheidungen, unterschiedlicher Konzeptionen von Sprache und sozialer Normativität.
Der Band fragt nach der Rolle und Funktion »autonomer« Kunst im Säkularisierungsprozess. Dieser ist nicht zuletzt durch die insistierende Präsenz christlicher Referenzen in der modernen europäischen Kunst gekennzeichnet. In Frage steht damit aber, dass die Kunst der Moderne sich in einem a-religiösen oder post-religiösen Raum bewegt. Umgekehrt liegt die Vermutung nahe, dass die säkulare Signatur der modernen Kunst erst vor dem Hintergrund des Christentums verständlich wird.
Origen, Wisdom, and the Logic of Interpretation
In Learning the Language of Scripture, Mark Randall James offers a new account of theological interpretation as a sapiential practice of learning the language of Scripture, drawing on recently discovered by the influential early theologian Origen of Alexandria (2nd-3rd c. C.E). Widely regarded as one of the most arbitrary interpreters, James shows that Origen’s appearance of arbitrariness is a result of the modern tendency to neglect the role of wisdom in scriptural interpretation. James demonstrates that Origen offers a compelling model of a Christian pragmatism in which learning and correcting linguistic practice is a site of the transformative pedagogy of the divine Logos.
Empowerment, Gender and Development in an African Movement
In Matarenda/Talents in Zimbabwean Pentecostalism, the fourteen contributors to this multidisciplinary collection reflect on how Pentecostalism contributes to the empowerment of marginalised societies, how it empowers women in particular through the matarenda (talents) principles, and how it contributes to the development of wider society. All but three of the authors are Zimbabwean Pentecostals.

The book deals with such subjects as gender equality, economics and finance, poverty alleviation and sustainable development, education, and entrepreneurship. A remarkable independent Zimbabwean church has harnessed biblical principles from the Parable of the Talents to empower women and those marginalised by economic disasters. It is particularly relevant for understanding the potential of African Pentecostalism in dealing with social and economic challenges.
The Indigenous ‘Injīliyyūn’ in the Arab-Muslim Context of Syria-Lebanon
After-Mission touches on on three questions.The first question is about self-perception and identity-formation strategies, and the various views that we have on the Protestants’ relation to their Arab Muslim Middle Eastern context. This will furnish the basis for the ensuing parts, as it will provide the study with coherent and analytical readings of the cultural situation and intellectual views of the Arab Eastern Protestants in their Sitz im Leben from the perspective of the hermeneutic tripod of ‘identity–othering–relationality’.

The second question, about the theological dimension, asks what kind of a theological discourse do the Protestants need to develop, and how do they need to re-form their own theological heritage, in such a manner that will allow them to heal the historical enmity and suspicion towards them from the Eastern Orthodox Christian community in the region? How should they re-think their traditional view on theological subjects common to them and the Eastern Christian tradition? Traditional Protestant attitudes towards Eastern Christianity, which have been viewed through the lens of evangelicalism and mission, have failed to grant the Protestants an influential and truly indigenous presence in the region and have led to them being constantly accused of being a foreign transplant and alien entity. In the light of this, it is clear that going beyond missiology and traditional evangelicalism demands re-thinking certain mutually shared but contentious theological subjects from a new perspective with the focus on more constructive attempts to build fellowship through dialogue.

Finally, the third question touches on the Protestants’ future in the Arab Muslim Middle East by viewing this inquiry from a broader perspective that is related to all the Middle Eastern Christian communities’ presence and role in the Muslim-majority context. It will discuss questions about the kind of presence and role that Christians, Protestants included, should hope to play in order to guarantee survival and a continuing presence in the region. The question of identity formation, and the managing of difference without trapping it in the mud of ‘otherizing and self-otherizing’, will also be tackled, so that the theological dimension is integrated with the broader, multifaceted contextual one.
This volume of Annotated Legal Documents on Islam in Europe covers Portugal and consists of an annotated collection of legal documents affecting the status of Islam and Muslims. The legal texts are published in the original Portuguese language while the annotations and supporting material are in English. By legal documents are meant the texts of legislation, including relevant secondary legislation, as well as significant court decisions. Each legal text is preceded by an introduction describing the historical, political and legal circumstances of its adoption, plus a short paragraph summarising its content. The focus of the collection is on the religious dimensions of being Muslim in Europe, i.e. on individuals' access to practise their religious obligations and on the ability to organise and manifest their religious life.
Christ’s Twofold Kingdom in Reformed Theology
In this historical study, Jonathon D. Beeke considers the various sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Reformed expressions regarding the duplex regnum Christi (the twofold kingdom of Christ), or, as especially denominated in the Lutheran context, the “doctrine of the two kingdoms.” While a sampling of patristic and medieval sources is considered, the focus is on select magisterial Reformers of the sixteenth century and representative intellectual centers of the seventeenth century (Leiden, Geneva, and Edinburgh). A primary concern is to examine the development of these formulations over the two centuries in question, and relate its maturation to the theological and political context of the early modern period. Various conclusions are offered that address the contemporary “two-kingdoms” debate within the Reformed tradition.
Author: Vincent Bacote
The “Good news” is central to evangelical theology and the movement known as evangelicalism, but the news has not always been good for minorities who inhabit evangelical communities and institutions in the United States. Vincent Bacote argues a reckoning with questions of race is necessary for evangelical theology to help cultivate an evangelical movement more hospitable to minorities, particularly African-Americans. Evangelicalism is here regarded not only a set of beliefs about the Bible, Christ’s work on the cross, conversion and witness but also as a set of dispositions and postures that create openness to the concerns of minorities. With a perpetually uneasy conscience, Christians within the evangelical movement can cultivate a disposition ready to learn from the questions and contributions of minorities in evangelical spaces, such as William Bentley and Carl Ellis. A better evangelical theology is proposed as doctrines that yield actions that are truly good news for all.
In Fannie Lou Hamer’s Revolutionary Practical Theology Crozier acknowledges, analyses, and constructs the civil and human rights leader’s Christian thought and practice. Commonly known for her political activism, Hamer is presented as a religious thought leader whose embodiment of ideas and ideals helped to disrupt and transform the Jim Crow of the South within and beyond electoral politics.

Through primary source documents of Hamer’s oral history interviews, autobiographical writings, speeches, and multimedia publications on or about her life and legacy, Crozier allows Hamer to have her say on racial and environmental justice concerns. Crozier introduces Hamer as a revolutionary practical theologian who resided on the margins of the church, academy, and society.
Retrieving Robert Browne (c. 1550-1633) for Contemporary Ecclesiology
In Ordained Ministry in Free Church Perspective Jan Martijn Abrahamse presents a constructive theology of ordained ministry by returning to the life and thought of the English Separatist Robert Browne (c. 1550-1633).

This study makes a substantial contribution not only by solving one of the most thorny problems in congregational ecclesiology, but also by recovering the legacy of this ecclesial pioneer. Through an in-depth analysis of Browne’s literature, the author provides a covenantal theology of ordained ministry in conversation with present-day authors Stanley Hauerwas and Kevin Vanhoozer.

Inspired by the emerging trend of ‘theology of retrieval’ Abrahamse offers a methodologically innovative way of doing systematic theology in a manner in which voices from the past can be made fruitful for today.