Between Criminalization and Protection

The Italian Way of Dealing with Migrant Smuggling and Trafficking within the European and International Context

Series:

Vincenzo Militello and Alessandro Spena

This volume is devoted to the dark side of human mobility, that is migrant smuggling, and, linked with it, human trafficking. Both subjects will be mainly treated from an Italian perspective; however, due to their having a generally transnational character, the analysis will necessarily require that international and supranational actions/measures also be taken into account. Moreover, the legal perspective will be supplemented by the phenomenological/criminological one, through which the authors try to provide the work with a realistic dimension aimed at grasping the practical aspects of both migrant smuggling and human trafficking emerging from the different ways in which such crimes are de facto committed.

Chinese Activism of a Different Kind

The Chinese Students' Campaign to Stay in Australia

Series:

Gao Jia

In Chinese Activism of a Different Kind, Jia Gao examines the social behavior and patterns of actions of 45,000 or so Chinese students as they fought to obtain the right to stay permanently in Australia after the June 4 'Tiananmen Square' incident of 1989.
In a time of relative Internet infancy their response to the shifting stances of the Australian government saw them build networks, make use of media and develop a range of strategies. In achieving success this diverse group of students became the largest intake of onshore asylum seekers in the history of Australian immigration. Through their testimonies Jia Gao provides a fascinating addition to our knowledge of Chinese activism and to the history of Chinese migration.

Series:

Edited by Alessandro Triulzi and Robert McKenzie

Trapped inside lorries or huddled aboard unseaworthy boats, irregular African migrants make for troubling headlines in western media, fueling fever pitch fears of an impending "African exodus" to Europe. Despite the increasing, albeit sensational, attention irregular migration attracts on both sides of the Mediterranean, little is known about what shapes and influences the lives of these Africans before, during, and after their “migratory projects.” By privileging migrants' narratives and drawing on evidence-based field research from different disciplinary backgrounds, the volume demystifies and dislodges many common assumptions about the human ecology of irregular African migration to Europe, arguably one of the most widely debated, yet least understood, phenomenon of our time.

Edited by James C. Hathaway

Violence and other human rights abuses continue to force desperate people to migrate in search of protection. Yet because the political and economic reasons that induced an historical openness to the arrival of refugees have largely withered away, there is no longer a guarantee that any state will be prepared to receive these involuntary migrants. Governments of both North and South are withdrawing from the international legal duty to provide potentially indefinite protection to any and all refugees who arrive at their borders.
The challenge is to reconceive refugee protection in a way that is reconcilable with the legitimate concerns of modern states, yet which does not sacrifice the critical right of at-risk people to seek asylum. The essays in Reconceiving International Refugee Law offer a response to the concerns of many states that refugee protection has become no more than a `back door' route to permanent immigration, and that its costs are not fairly apportioned among states. Drawing on the research of leading migration scholars from around the world, and vetted through dialogue with senior officials and non-governmental experts, this volume explores the potential for a shift to a robust and empowering system of temporary asylum, supported by a pragmatic system of guarantees to share both the costs and human responsibilities of refugee protection.

Centre d'Etude et de Recherche de Droit