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Editor: Mathias Reimann
The article provides an introduction to, and overview of, the discipline of comparative law as it stands in 2020, including the major debates and positions that define it. It explores the field’s development, coverage in both geographic and subject matter terms, uses and goals, as well its approaches and methods. It addresses itself mainly to non-specialists who are looking for overall orientation or a brief introduction to specific areas or topics. It references the most important literature for readers who want to delve more deeply into particular subjects or issues.
Author: Shreya Atrey
This volume in the Brill Research Perspectives in Comparative Discrimination Law addresses intersectionality from the lens of comparative antidiscrimination law. The term ‘intersectionality’ was coined by Kimberlé Williams Crenshaw in 1989. As a field, intersectionality has a longer history, of nearly two hundred years. Meanwhile, comparative antidiscrimination law as a field may be just over a few decades old. Thus, intersectionality’s tryst with antidiscrimination law is a fairly recent one. Developed as a critique of antidiscrimination law, intersectionality has had a significant influence on it. Yet, intersectionality’s logic does not seem to have infiltrated the logic of antidiscrimination law completely. Comparative antidiscrimination law continues to develop with intersectionality in sight, but rarely, in step. On the occasion of the 30th anniversary of Crenshaw’s seminal article that coined the term in the context of antidiscrimination law, Shreya Atrey explores this irony. Her article provides a meta-narrative of the development of the two fields with the purpose of showing what appear to be orthogonal trajectories.
Positive measures to prevent and remedy discrimination have been adopted in many parts of the world. By comparing the scope and form of such measures in different legal systems, we can gain a better perspective on our own system, and appreciate possible new approaches. This book compares positive anti-discrimination measures in the United States, India, Brazil, South Africa, Canada, the United Kingdom, and the European Union.
Author: Alysia Blackham
In Empirical Research and Workplace Discrimination Law, part of the series Comparative Discrimination Law, Alysia Blackham offers a succinct comparative survey of empirical research that is occurring in workplace discrimination law, across jurisdictions such as the United States of America, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia and New Zealand. Drawing on case studies of existing scholarship, Alysia Blackham offers both a rationale for conducting empirical research in this area, and methodological options for researchers considering empirical work. Using examples from case law and public policy, Alysia Blackham considers the impact that empirical research is having on discrimination law and policy, and highlights fundamental gaps in existing empirical scholarship.

Other titles published in this series:
- Comparative Discrimination Law: Historical and Theoretical Frameworks, Laura Carlson; isbn 9789004345447
- International Human Rights Law and Discrimination Protections; A Comparison of Regional and National Responses, Mpoki Mwakagali; isbn 9789004345461
- Age as a Protected Ground, Lucy Vickers; isbn 9789004345539
- Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Discrimination, Holning Lau; isbn 9789004345485
- Racial Discrimination, Tanya Katerí Hernández; isbn 9789004345942
This fifth volume in the Brill Research Perspectives in Comparative Discrimination Law surveys the field of comparative race discrimination law for the purpose of providing an introduction to the nature of comparing systems of discrimination and the transnational search for effective equality laws and policies. This volume includes the perspectives of racialized subjects (subalterns) in the examination of the reach of the laws on the ground. It engages a variety of legal and social science resources in order to compare systems across a number of contexts (such as the United States, Canada, France, South Africa, Brazil, Colombia, Peru, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, Israel, India, and others). The goal is to analyze the strengths and weaknesses of various kinds of anti-discrimination legal devices to aid in the study of law reform efforts across the globe centered on racial equality.

Other titles published in this series:
- Comparative Discrimination Law: Historical and Theoretical Frameworks, Laura Carlson; isbn 9789004345447
- International Human Rights Law and Discrimination Protections; A Comparison of Regional and National Responses, Mpoki Mwakagali; isbn 9789004345461
- Comparative Discrimination Law; Age as a Protected Ground, Lucy Vickers; isbn 9789004345539
- Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Discrimination, Holning Lau; isbn 9789004345485
Sixth Revised Edition
This sixth, revised edition of International Institutional Law covers the most recent developments in the field. Although public international organizations such as the United Nations, the World Trade Organization, the African Union, ASEAN, the European Union, Mercosur, NATO and OPEC have broadly divergent objectives, powers, fields of activity and numbers of member states, they also share a wide variety of institutional characteristics. Rather than being a handbook for specific organizations, the book offers a comparative analysis of the institutional law of international organizations. It includes chapters on the rules and practices concerning membership, institutional structure, decision-making, financing, legal order, supervision and sanctions, legal status and external relations. The book’s theoretical framework and extensive use of case-studies is designed to appeal to both academics and practitioners.
Author: Holning Lau
In Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity Discrimination Holning Lau offers an incisive review of the conceptual questions that arise as legal systems around the world grapple with whether and how to protect people against sexual orientation and gender identity discrimination. This volume is an essential guide for researchers seeking to acquaint themselves quickly with a comparative view of cutting-edge issues concerning sexual orientation and gender identity rights.

Other titles published in this series:
- Comparative Discrimination Law: Historical and Theoretical Frameworks, Laura Carlson; isbn 9789004345447
- International Human Rights Law and Discrimination Protections; A Comparison of Regional and National Responses, Mpoki Mwakagali; isbn 9789004345461
- Comparative Discrimination Law; Age as a Protected Ground, Lucy Vickers; isbn 9789004345539
Author: Lucy Vickers
This comparative review of age as a protected ground in discrimination law explores the underpinning questions and themes related to two main dimensions of age discrimination. The first dimension is structural, economic and labour market driven, whereby age is used to allocate a range of rights, obligations and benefits within society. The second is the social justice and equality dimension, in which age is understood as an aspect of individual identity that is worthy of protection against indignity or detriment. The review then considers the law on age discrimination in a number of jurisdictions, the EU law, the UK, Sweden, USA, Canada and South Africa, and assesses the extent to which the underpinning questions explain the developing case law.

Other titles published in this series:
- Comparative Discrimination Law: Historical and Theoretical Frameworks, Laura Carlson; isbn 9789004345447
- International Human Rights Law and Discrimination Protections; A Comparison of Regional and National Responses, Mpoki Mwakagali; isbn 9789004345461
National criminal justice systems are slowly integrating in an effort to combat cross border criminality. New Perspectives on the Structure of Transnational Criminal Justice provides a forum for critical perspectives on this evolving system, with the goal of testing and challenging conceptions of transnational criminal law. Collectively, the papers in this special issue investigate the main symbolic and material characteristics of this space of justice, how it is organized and what dynamics shape its functionality and impact.
This massive work represents the labour of hundreds of lawyers and scholars throughout the world. It is undoubtedly the most extensive and thorough examination of comparative law on the international level ever published. It incorporates not only detailed descriptions of the legal systems of more than 150 countries but, above all, thoroughly documented comparative analyses of the main issues in civil and commercial law and related issues world-wide. Consisting of 17 volumes in total, each volume is divided into 6-20 chapters written by relevant specialists. Rather than delaying publication until the volume is complete, every chapter is published on completion in paperback form. Once a year several of these chapters, not necessarily of the same volume, are sent to subscribers in single instalment. As soon as all the chapters in a given volume are ready, they are indexed, updated where necessary and sent to subscribers in high-quality hardback form. For an up-to-date list of published instalments, their contents, and prices, please contact brill@turpin-distribution.com