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No further editions of the Etymological Calendar are planned.

What does the word lord have to do with bread? How is smile related to mirror? Why is Donald such an appropriate name for an American president?

These and 363 other questions are answered in the Etymology Calendar of 2020. This popular scientific calendar provides an insight into the fascinating world of historical linguistics for anyone with an interest in languages. It treats the surprising histories behind words you use on a daily basis, but also contains interesting developments from tens of other languages. An essential collection of etymological trivia for every language enthusiast!

The Etymology Calendar is interesting for readers without linguistic background or knowledge of foreign languages. However, even experienced linguists will gain many surprising new insights.
No further editions of the Etymological Calendar are planned.

Wat hebben vampiers en liefhebbers van sangria met elkaar gemeen? Zijn de meeste dromen inderdaad bedrog? En waarom zijn Russische vriendschappen verwant aan Roemeense kettingzagen?

Op deze en nog 363 andere vragen geeft de Etymologiekalender van 2020 antwoord. Deze populairwetenschappelijke scheurkalender maakt de fascinerende wereld van de historische taalwetenschap inzichtelijk voor iedereen met een interesse voor taal. Je leert niet alleen over de verrassende geschiedenis die achter veel Nederlandse woorden schuilgaat, maar ook over grappige en onverwachte ontwikkelingen in een dozijn andere talen. Een onmisbare collectie taalweetjes voor iedere liefhebber!

De Etymologiekalender is geschikt voor iedereen zonder kennis van vreemde talen of taalwetenschappelijke achtergrond. Ook doorgewinterde taalkundigen zullen er echter heel wat nieuws bij leren.
Reprint of the 1968 original
This book, a reprint of one of the classics of historical linguistics, contains five papers originally presented at a 1966 symposium at the University of Texas at Austin. The individual contributions cover a broad range of topics, from Ferdinand de Saussure’s influence on historical linguistics to the connection between inflectional paradigms and sound change to language change in contemporary linguistic communities. Each of the contributions has had a sizable effect on the development of linguistics; the final paper, by Uriel Weinreich, Marvin Herzog, and William Labov, for instance, laid the foundation for contemporary historical sociolinguistics. The volume has long been out of print; this new edition will make it accessible to a new generation of linguists.
Synchronic and diachronic perspectives
Volume Editors: Marc Fryd and Pierre-Don Giancarli
This volume gathers nine contributions dealing with Aorists and Perfects. Drinka challenges the notion of Aoristic Drift in Romance languages. Walker considers two emergent uses of the Perfect in British English. Jara seeks to determine the constraints on tense choice within narrative discourse in Peruvian Spanish. Henderson argues for a theory based on Langacker’s ‘sequential scanning’ in Chilean and Uruguayan Spanish. Delmas looks at ’Ua in Tahitian, a polysemic particle with a range of aspectual and modal meanings. Bourdin addresses the expression of anteriority with just in English. Yerastov examines the distribution of the transitive be Perfect in Canadian English. Fryd offers a panchronic study of have-less perfect constructions in English. Eide investigates counterfactual present perfects in Mainland Scandinavian dialects.
En français, latin, corse, estonien et polonais
Le présent volume regroupe onze contributions centrées sur le parfait et l’aoriste dans cinq langues : Joffre expose l’ambiguïté fondamentale du passif périphrastique et des déponents latins, tandis que Dalbera propose un invariant à son parfait. Giancarli vérifie l’existence d’une corrélation entre la variation d’auxiliaire et celle du participe passé du verbe corse. Le statut de parfait de la construction polonaise avoir + participe + objet est mis en doute successivement par Nowakowska et par Sikora. Treikelder se concentre sur l’émergence du parfait estonien en contexte atypique. En français, Lindschouw & Schøsler envisagent les relations entre circonstants temporels, passé compose et passé simple ; Vetters retrace la dérive aoristique de ce dernier tandis que Apothéloz se refuse à parler d’aoriste.

This volume is a collection of eleven contributions dealing with perfect and aorist tenses in five languages: Joffre shows the fundamental ambiguity of the periphrasis of Latin passive and deponent verbs, while Dalbera proposes an invariant meaning for its perfect. Giancarli tests the hypothesis of a correlation between the variation of auxiliaries and that of past participles in Corsican. The perfect status of the Polish have + participle + object construction is questioned in turn by Nowakowska and Sikora. Treikelder focuses on the Estonian perfect in atypical contexts. Concerning French, Lindschouw & Schøsler look at the relationships between time adjuncts, passé compose and passé simple; Vetters describes the aoristic evolution of the latter, while Apothéloz explains why it should not be considered an aorist.

Contributors are: Denis Apothéloz, Joseph Dalbera, Pierre-Don Giancarli, Marie-Dominique Joffre, Jan Lindschouw, Małgorzata Nowakowska, Lene Schøsler, Dorota Sikora, Anu Treikelder, Carl Vetters.


Editor: Guus Kroonen
Volume Editors: Emmanuelle Labeau and Qiaochao Zhang
This volume on TAME systems (Tense-aspect-mood-evidentiality) stems from the 10th Chronos conference that took place in Aston University (Birmingham, UK) on 18th-20th April 2011. The papers collated here are therefore a chosen selection from a stringent peer-review process. They also witness to the width and breadth of the interests pursued within the Chronos community. Besides the traditional Western European languages, this volume explores languages from Eastern Europe (Greek, Romanian, Russian) and much further afield such as Brazilian Portuguese, Korean or Mandarin Chinese. Little known languages from the Amazonian forest (Amondawa, Baure) or the Andes (Aymara) also come under scrutiny.

This book explores the relationships between possession, existence and location. After revising the conceptualization of possession in Latin, the analysis is extended to Spanish. From this perspective, certain possession constructions in Spanish are examined. First of all, it is argued that all datives are related to possession in dative constructions; secondly, the characterizing features of the transitive, intransitive and reflexive variants are determined in constructions with psychological verbs; and, finally, the existence of comitative possession in Spanish is proved by the analysis of comitative constructions.
Der Band enthält 13 Studien zum Schauspiel des Mittelalters und der Frühen Neuzeit. Dabei werden einerseits theoretische Betrachtungen, etwa zum Unterschied zwischen Osterfeier und Osterspiel oder zur Bedeutung der Musik für die Spiele, vorgelegt. Andererseits wird auf spezifische Spiele eingegangen, wie etwa auf das Heidelberger Passionsspiel von 1514, das Lübener Osterspielfragment, das älteste schwedische Spiel 'De uno peccatore', das Theophilusspiel, das Berliner Weihnachtsspiel von 1589 und Sebastian Brants 'Tugent Spyl'. Aber auch die Rezeption der Komödien des Terenz, die Entwicklung des Fasnachtspiels, das Puppenspiel in den Bearbeitungen des Maugis d'Aigremont sowie der Inseldiskurs und dessen Einfluss etwa auf Shakespeares 'The Tempest' werden behandelt.

Die Beiträge stammen von Bernd Bastert, Bart Besamusca, Cornelia Herberichs, Johannes Janota, Cobie Kuné, Tanja Mattern, Volker Mertens, Christian Moser, Arend Quak, Werner Röcke, Eckehard Simon, Clara Strijbosch und Elke Ukena-Best.

On the Cutting edge of Areal and Phylogenetic Linguistics
Editors: Soren Wichmann and Jeff Good
Quantifying Language Dynamics: On the Cutting Edge of Areal and Phylogenetic Linguistics contains specially-selected papers introducing new, quantitative methodologies for understanding language interaction and evolution. It draws upon data from the phonologies, morphologies, numeral systems, constituent orders, case systems, and lexicons of the world’s languages, bringing large datasets and sophisticated statistical techniques to bear on fundamental questions such as: how to identify and account for areal distributions, when language contact leads to grammatical simplification, whether patterns of morphological borrowing can be predicted, how to deal with contact within phylogenetic models, and what new techniques are most effective for classification of the world’s languages. The book is relevant for students and scholars in general linguistics, typology, and historical and comparative linguistics.