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Artful Works and Dialogue about Art as Experience
Volume Editors: Patricia L. Maarhuis and A.G. Rud
Imagining Dewey features productive (re)interpretations of 21st century experience using the lens of John Dewey’s Art as Experience, through the doubled task of putting an array of international philosophers, educators, and artists-researchers in transactional dialogue and on equal footing in an academic text. This book is a pragmatic attempt to encourage application of aesthetic learning and living, ekphrasic interpretation, critical art, and agonist pluralism.

There are two foci: (a) Deweyan philosophy and educational themes with (b) analysis and examples of how educators, artists, and researchers envision and enact artful meaning making. This structure meets the needs of university and high school audiences, who are accustomed to learning about challenging ideas through multimedia and aesthetic experience.

Contributors are: James M. Albrecht, Adam I. Attwood, John Baldacchino, Carolyn L. Berenato, M. Cristina Di Gregori, Holly Fairbank, Jim Garrison, Amanda Gulla, Bethany Henning, Jessica Heybach, David L. Hildebrand, Ellyn Lyle, Livio Mattarollo, Christy McConnell Moroye, María-Isabel Moreno-Montoro, María Martínez Morales, Stephen M. Noonan, Louise G. Phillips, Scott L. Pratt, Joaquin Roldan, Leopoldo Rueda, Tadd Ruetenik, Leísa Sasso, Bruce Uhrmacher, David Vessey, Ricardo Marín Viadel, Sean Wiebe, Li Xu and Martha Patricia Espíritu Zavalza.
Grundbegriffe der Musikphilosophie
Author: Timo Dresenkamp
Volume Editors: Phil Shining and Nicol Michelle Epple
The wide spectrum of links and interrelations found amongst the diversity of human sexual expressions and spiritual practices around the world constitutes one of the most fruitful grounds of scholarly research today. Exploring Sexuality and Spirituality introduces an emerging academic field of studies focused on the multiplicity of problematizations intersecting spirituality and sexuality, from eroticism and ecstasy embodiments to inner spiritual cultivation, intimate relationships, sex education, and gender empowerment. This collection of essays addresses subjects such as prehistoric art, Queer Theology, BDSM, Tantra, the Song of Songs, ‘la petite mort’, asceticism, feminist performative protests, and sexually charged landscapes, among others. Through varied methodologies and state-of-the-art interdisciplinary approaches, this volume becomes highly useful for readers engaged in the integration of scholarly and practical knowledge.
An Interdisciplinary Exploration of Visual Literacy
Volume Editor: Julia Lane
Tracing Behind the Image: An Interdisciplinary Exploration of Visual Literacy, discusses how our relationship to images, collectively and individually, is constantly shifting, as we adapt to the evolving image economy of our increasingly screen-based world. This volume offers pedagogies, analyses and strategies for developing visual literacy across education and industry.

The language of images embodies highly complex and nuanced statements and readings, the ability to invent and reinvent, it is bursting with opportunities to be lyrical, satirical, rhetorical, to unravel meanings, and to pose as many questions as it answers. It is a language of investigation and experimentation, it both constructs and shatters cultural expectations, and is constantly and rapidly transforming as forced by current social and political climates.
Author: Gianmaria Ajani
The advent of Artificial Intelligence (AI) as an “autonomous author” urges the law to rethink authorship, originality, creativity. AI-generated artworks are in search of an author because current copyright laws offer as a solution only public domain or fragile regulatory mechanisms. During the 20th century visual artists have been posing persistent challenges to the law world: Conceptual Art favoured legal mechanisms alternative to copyright law. The case of AI-art is, however, different: for the first time the artworld is discovering the prospective of an art without human authors. Rather than preserving the status quo in the law world, policy makers should consider a reformative conception of AI in copyright law and take inspiration from innovative theories in the field of robot law, where new frames for a legal personhood of artificial agents are proposed. This would have a spill-over effect also on copyright regulations.
Echoes from a Child’s Soul: Awakening the Moral Imagination of Children presents remarkable poetry inspired by aesthetic education methodology created by children that were labelled academically, socially, and/or emotionally at-risk. Many children deemed average or below-grade level composed poetry beyond their years revealing moral imagination. Art psychology and aesthetic methodology merge to portray the power of awakening children’s voices once silenced. The children’s poetry heralds critical and empathic messages for our future. This book proposes an overwhelming need for change in America’s public-school education system so that no child is ignored, silenced, deemed less than, or marginalized.
Author: Barbara Pasa
The complex nature of industrial design, which combines functional and aesthetic elements, allows different modes of protection: cumulative, separate or partially overlapping regimes are applicable according to different legal systems. The legal framework is rapidly changing, especially in Europe where the principle of cumulation of a special sui generis regime for protecting industrial design with copyright rules has been established. In the last decade, national courts of some Member States conferred to the “cumulative regime” a peculiar meaning, other courts enforced design rights in line with the interpretation given by the Court of Justice of the EU. The copyright/design interface is presented here to a wider, non-specialist audience, taking as a starting point the notion of industrial design derived from design studies, on the border between art and science.
Neu bearbeitet und herausgegeben von Stefan Majetschak
Das Buch „Kunst“ von Clive Bell, das 1914 erschien, ist ein Klassiker der Kunsttheorie, der noch heute starke Beachtung findet und moderne Strömungen der Kunsttheorie inspiriert. Clive Bell war als bedeutender Kunstkritiker Mitglied der legendären Bloomsbury Group, die zu Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts die kulturelle Modernisierung Englands vorantrieb. Bell geht es in seinem Buch um die Frage, welche Eigenschaft ein Werk zu einem Kunstwerk macht. Seine Antwort: Es ist die „signifikante Form“, die allen Kunstwerken gemeinsam ist und die unser ästhetisches Gefühl auslöst. Diese auf die Form bezogene essentialistische Kunstauffassung ist nicht unwidersprochen geblieben, ist aber bis heute ein wichtiges Dokument einer formalistischen Ästhetik, die zu ihrer Zeit den post-impressionistischen Malern wie Cézanne, Matisse und Picasso in der angelsächsischen Welt zum Durchbruch verhalf.Die zuletzt im Jahr 1922 erschienene deutsche Übersetzung von Paul Westheim wird hier in einer vollständig überarbeiteten Fassung neu vorgelegt.
Law and images are generally not regarded as having much in common, since law is based on textual and images are based on visual information. The paper demonstrates that quite to the contrary, legal norms can be understood as models of intended moral behaviour and hence as images, in the same way as images can be said to have a normative and hence regulatory effect. Following an interdisciplinary approach along the lines of cultural research, the paper explains how images “function” to lawyers and how the law “works” to those trained in the visual sciences. In addition, laying the foundations for a research field “Law and Images” in parallel to the well-established “Law and Literature”, the paper describes the main avenues for future research in this field. Also, the paper contains a brief systematization of images in law, of law and for law.
The Work of Art in the Age of its Technological Producibility
Photography was invented in the mid-nineteenth century, and ever since that moment painters have been asking what they are there for. Everyone has their own strategy. Some say they do not paint what is there, but their impressions. Others paint things that are not seen in the world, and therefore cannot be photographed, because they are abstractions. Others yet exhibit urinals in art galleries. This may look like the end of art but, instead, it is the dawn of a new day, not only for painting but – this is the novelty – for every form of art, as well as for the social world in general and for industry, where repetitive tasks are left to machines and humans are required to behave like artists.