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Interdisciplinary Reflections
Editor: Jan G. Michel
Scientific progress depends crucially on scientific discoveries. Yet the topic of scientific discoveries has not been central to debate in the philosophy of science. This book aims to remedy this shortcoming. Based on a broad reading of the term “science” (similar to the German term “Wissenschaft ”), the book convenes experts from different disciplines who reflect upon several intertwined questions connected to the topic of making scientific discoveries.
Among these questions are the following: What are the preconditions for making scientific discoveries? What is it that we (have to) do when we make discoveries in science? What are the objects of scientific discoveries, how do we name them, and how do scientific names function? Do dis-coveries in, say, physics and biology, share an underlying structure, or do they differ from each other in crucial ways? Are other fields such as theology and environmental studies loci of scientific discovery? What is the purpose of making scientific discoveries? Explaining nature or reality? Increasing scientific knowledge? Finding new truths? If so, how can we account for instructive blunders and serendipities in science?
In the light of the above, the following is an encompassing question of the book: What does it mean to make a discovery in science, and how can scientific discoveries be distinguished from non-scientific discoveries?
In Sociocybernetics and Political Theory in a Complex World, Roberto Mancilla posits that because current political and constitutional theory was crafted since the XVII century, in the age of globalisation, Google and Big Data, other arrangements are needed. He proposes a recasting of the ideas of the State, Separation of Powers, The Public/Private Distinction and Constitutionalism by means of cybernetics, a body of knowledge that gave way to the technology that we have today. This will be done by means of a general introduction to sociocybernetics and complexity and then through the critical dismantling of said concepts of political theory and then proposals imbued with newer ideas.
Eine wissenschaftstheoretische Untersuchung zu Intervention, Invarianz und Prognose
Author: Benedikt Fait
Sind die Wirtschaftswissenschaften eine Wissenschaft? Benedikt Fait stellt sich auf Grundlage kausaltheoretischer Überlegungen dieser Sichtweise entgegen und kommt zu einem überraschenden Ergebnis.
Ziel des Buches ist die Anwendung der zurzeit viel diskutierten interventionistischen Kausaltheorie (James Woodward) auf die Ökonomik. Diese Anwendung kommt zu dem Ergebnis, dass Kausalurteile in der Ökonomik nur unzureichend zu begründen sind. Auf Grundlage wissenschaftstheoretischer Überlegungen wird daher eine neue Perspektive auf die Ökonomik vorgeschlagen: Statt sich primär an den Naturwissenschaften zu orientieren, sollte sich die Ökonomik vielmehr als eine Art abstrakte Kunst oder abstraktes Handwerk begreifen, das in der handelnden Auseinandersetzung mit seinem Gegenstand – der Ökonomie – ein tendenziell idiographisches und daher nur bedingt verallgemeinerbares Erfahrungswissen eruiert.
Fünf Disziplinen - eine Familie?
Praxis und Wissenschaft – wie hängen sie zusammen, wenn man ihr Verhältnis von der Praxis her denkt? Welche Gemeinsamkeiten und Unterschiede ergeben sich hierzu zwischen klinischer Medizin, Psychotherapie, Rechtspflege, Seelsorge und Pädagogik? Alle fünf Disziplinen haben es seit jeher mit der „gebrechlichen Einrichtung der Welt“ zu tun. Ihr Umgang mit den ihnen aufgegebenen Patienten, Klienten, Mandanten, Trostsuchenden, Auszubildenden hat sich zunehmend verwissenschaftlicht, beschleunigt seit Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts. Zum einen nehmen sie fortlaufend Ergebnisse diverser Bezugswissenschaften in sich auf. Zum anderen ist und war ihre Praxis immer auch ein Ort eigenständiger empirischer Forschung und Theoriebildung. Eingeleitet wird der Band durch einen historisch-genealogischen Beitrag; den Schluss bildet ein wissenschaftstheoretischer, der sich noch einmal der Familienähnlichkeit der Disziplinen widmet.
Author: Markus Locker
This book argues that all truths systems include paradoxes. Paradoxes, such as found in the sciences, philosophy and religion offer themselves as mutually shared partners in a dialogue of arguably incommensurable truths on the basis of their underlying truth. Paradoxes leap beyond the epistemic border of individual truth claims. A dialogue of truths, grounded in paradox, reaches before, and at the same time past singular truths. A paradox-based dialogue of truths elevates the communication of disciplines, such as the sciences and religion, to a meta-discourse level from which differences are not perceived as obstacles for dialogue but as complementary aspects of a deeper and fuller truth in which all truths are grounded.
First published as a special issue of the journal Medieval Encounters (vol. 23, 2017), this volume, edited by Josefina Rodríguez-Arribas, Charles Burnett, Silke Ackermann, and Ryan Szpiech, brings together fifteen studies on various aspects of the astrolabe in medieval cultures. The astrolabe, developed in antiquity and elaborated throughout the Middle Ages, was used for calculation, teaching, and observation, and also served astrological and medical purposes. It was the most popular and prestigious of the mathematical instruments, and was found equally among practitioners of various sciences and arts as among princes in royal courts. By considering sources and instruments from Muslim, Christian, and Jewish contexts, this volume provides state-of-the-art research on the history and use of the astrolabe throughout the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Silke Ackermann, Emilia Calvo, John Davis, Laura Fernández Fernández, Miquel Forcada, Azucena Hernández, David A. King, Taro Mimura, Günther Oestmann, Josefina Rodríguez-Arribas, Sreeramula Rajeswara Sarma, Petra G. Schmidl, Giorgio Strano, Flora Vafea, and Johannes Thomann.
Author: Sanja Ivic
This book investigates the importance of Ricoeur’s hermeneutics and poetics in rethinking humanities. In particular, Ricoeur’s insights on reference as refiguration and his idea of interpretation as a triadic process (which consists of mimesis 1 – prefiguration, mimesis 2 – configuration, and mimesis 3 – refiguration) will be applied to philosophy of science and to literary and historical texts. It will be shown that Ricoeur’s idea of emplotment can be extended and applied to scientific, literary and historical texts. This multidisciplinary research will include philosophy of science, metaphysics, hermeneutics, and literary theory.
The Botanical Emergence in Contemporary Art
Editor: Giovanni Aloi
Winner of the 2019 Choice Outstanding Academic Title

Why Look at Plants? proposes a thought-provoking and fascinating look into the emerging cultural politics of plant-presence in contemporary art. Through the original contributions of artists, scholars, and curators who have creatively engaged with the ultimate otherness of plants in their work, this volume maps and problematizes new intra-active, agential interconnectedness involving human-non-human biosystems central to artistic and philosophical discourses of the Anthropocene.

Plant’s fixity, perceived passivity, and resilient silence have relegated the vegetal world to the cultural background of human civilization. However, the recent emergence of plants in the gallery space constitutes a wake-up-call to reappraise this relationship at a time of deep ecological and ontological crisis. Why Look at Plants? challenges readers’ pre-established notions through a diverse gathering of insights, stories, experiences, perspectives, and arguments encompassing multiple disciplines, media, and methodologies.
Australian Culture, Art, and Trees
Editors: John C. Ryan and Rod Giblett
Forest Family highlights the importance of the old-growth forests of Southwest Australia to art, culture, history, politics, and community identity. The volume weaves together the natural and cultural histories of Southwest eucalypt forests, spanning pre-settlement, colonial, and contemporary periods. The contributors critique a range of content including historical documents, music, novels, paintings, performances, photography, poetry, and sculpture representing ancient Australian forests. Forest Family centers on the relationship between old-growth nature and human culture through the narrative strand of the Giblett family of Western Australia and the forests in which they settled during the nineteenth century. The volume will be of interest to general readers of environmental history, as well as scholars in critical plant studies and the environmental humanities.
Art’s Return to Vegetal Life
Author: Prudence Gibson
The Plant Contract argues that visual and performance art can help change our perception of the vegetal world, and can return us to nature and thought. Via an investigation into the wasteland, robotany, feminist plants, and nature rights, this phytology-love story investigates how contemporary art is mediating the effects of plant-blindness, caused by human disassociation from the natural world. It is also a gesture of respect for the genius of vegetal life, where new science proves plants can learn, communicate, remember, make decisions, and associate. Art is a litmus test for how climate change affects human perception. This book responds to that test by expressing plant-philosophy to a wider public, through an interrogation of plant-art.