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Author: Katrin Thomson
Series Editors: Jan Stievermann and Matthias Bauer
Author: Lisa Ebert
Since its publication, Emily Brontë’s Wuthering Heights has given rise to an unusual plurality of interpretations, leading to the impression that the novel somehow resists interpretation. The author offers a new reading of the novel that takes this effect into account by investigating its reason: ambiguity is a thematic focal point and structural key element of the novel.
This study is concerned with the ambiguity of Wuthering Heights which arises through a complex interplay of distinct but interdependent ambiguities of perception, narration, and the narrated world. In particular, it shows how specific ambiguous utterances (e.g. a clash of implicatures and presuppositions) are linked with each other and contribute to the global ambiguity of the text. In this way, not only the function of ambiguity for understanding Wuthering Heights is explored but also the function of Wuthering Heights for understanding ambiguity. The book should thus be of interest not only to Brontë scholars and Victorianists but also to literary scholars and linguists in general.
Volume Editors: Jolanta Wawrzycka and Erika Mihálycsa
The essays in Retranslating Joyce for the 21st Century straddle the disciplines of Joyce studies, translation studies, and translation theory. The newest scholarly developments in these fields are well reflected in recent retranslations of Joyce’s works into Italian, Portuguese, French, Hungarian, Dutch, Turkish, German, South Slavic, and many other languages. Joyce critics and Joyce translators offer multi-angled critical attention to the issues of translation and retranslation, enhanced by their diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds and innovative methodologies. Because retranslations of Joyce have also exerted significant influence on target language cultures, students and readers of Joyce and, more broadly, of modernist and world literature, will find this book highly relevant to their appreciation of literature in translation.
Empirical Form and Religious Function provides a fresh perspective on the rise of empirical apparition narratives in the Anglophone world of the Early Enlightenment era.
Drawing on both well-established and previously unknown sources, Michael Dopffel here offers a fundamental reappraisal of one of the defining narrative genres of the 17th and 18th centuries. Intricately connected to evolving discourses of natural philosophy, Protestant religion and popular literature, the apparition narratives portrayed in this work constitute a hybrid genre whose interpretations and literary functions retained the ambiguity of their subject matter. Simultaneously an empirically approachable phenomena and a religious experience, witnesses and writers translated the spiritual characteristics of apparitions into distinct literary forms, thereby shaping conceptions of ghosts, whether factual or fictional, to this day.
Contemporary Fairy-Tale Magic, edited by Lydia Brugué and Auba Llompart, studies the impact of fairy tales on contemporary cultures from an interdisciplinary perspective, with special emphasis on how literature and film are retelling classic fairy tales for modern audiences. We are currently witnessing a resurgence of fairy tales and fairy-tale characters and motifs in art and popular culture, as well as an increasing and renewed interest in reinventing and subverting these narratives to adapt them to the expectations and needs of the contemporary public. The collected essays also observe how the influence of academic disciplines like Gender Studies and current literary and cinematic trends play an important part in the revision of fairy-tale plots, characters and themes.
This volume explores the varieties of the short form in American literature, art, and culture as well as different ideas and aesthetics of simplicity, plainness, and brevity from the 19th century to the present. The contributors discuss how these ideas were translated into widely diverging practices, serving an equally broad spectrum of cultural and political functions. The essays survey a range of media and genres, including short fiction, plays, popular rhetoric, songs, photography, film, and Twitter.
Der Band widmet sich Formen und Formgebungsprozessen von Zeit in der europäischen Literatur der Moderne. Den theoretischen Horizont des Bandes bilden aktuelle Forschungsansätze, in denen das Verhältnis von modernen Formtheorien zur Zeitlichkeit ästhetischer Prozesse reflektiert und problematisiert wird. Im Zentrum steht damit die Frage nach dem Wie der literarischen Zeitdarstellung. Die versammelten Beiträge zu Werken von Racine bis Egger untersuchen gattungsspezifische, rhetorische und poetologische Verfahren, durch die Zeit erfahrbar oder zumindest denkbar gemacht wird.
James Joyce and Genetic Criticism presents contemporary scholarship in genetic criticism and Joyce studies. In considering how evolutionary themes enhance the definition of the genetic method in interpreting texts, this volume presents a variety of manuscript-based analyses that engage how textual meaning, through addition and omission, grows. In doing so, this volume covers a wide-range of topics concerning Joycean genetics, some of which include Joyce’s editorial practice, the forthcoming revised edition of Finnegans Wake, the genetic relationship between Giacomo Joyce and Ulysses, the method and approach required for creating an online archive of Finnegans Wake, and the extensive genesis of “Penelope”.

Contributors are: Shinjini Chattopadhyay, Tim Conley, Luca Crispi, Robbert-Jan Henkes, Sangam MacDuff, Genevieve Sartor, Fritz Senn, Sam Slote, Dirk Van Hulle.
Appearing in an era of rapid change in the printing and publishing industries, James Joyce’s Ulysses exploited and exemplified those industries to the degree that the book can be seen as a virtual museum of 1904 media. Publishing in Joyce's “Ulysses”: Newspapers, Advertising and Printing, edited by William S. Brockman, Tekla Mecsnóber and Sabrina Alonso, gathers twelve essays by Joyce scholars exploring facets of those trades that pervade the substance of the book. Essays explore the book’s incorporation of mass-market weekly magazines, contemporary advertising slogans, newspaper clippings, the “Aeolus” episode’s printing office and the varied typographic styles of successive editions of Ulysses. Placing Joyce’s work in its historical milieu, the collection offers a fresh perspective on modern print culture.

Contributors are: Sabrina Alonso, Harald Beck, William S. Brockman, Elisabetta d'Erme, Judith Harrington, Matthew Hayward, Sangam MacDuff, Tekla Mecsnóber, Tamara Radak, Fritz Senn, David Spurr, Jolanta Wawrzycka.
Author: Julian Meyrick
In Australian Theatre after the New Wave, Julian Meyrick charts the history of three ground-breaking Australian theatre companies, the Paris Theatre (1978), the Hunter Valley Theatre (1976-94) and Anthill Theatre (1980-94). In the years following the controversial dismissal of Gough Whitlam’s Labor government in 1975, these ‘alternative’ theatres struggled to survive in an increasingly adverse economic environment. Drawing on interviews and archival sources, including Australia Council files and correspondence, the book examines the funding structures in which the companies operated, and the impact of the cultural policies of the period. It analyses the changing relationship between the artist and the State, the rise of a managerial ethos of ‘accountability’, and the growing dominance of government in the fate of the nation’s theatre. In doing so, it shows the historical roots of many of the problems facing Australian theatre today.

“This is an exceptionally timely book... In giving a history of Australian independent theatre it not only charts the amazing rise and strange disappearance of an energetic, radical and dynamically democratic artistic movement, but also tries to explain that rise and fall, and how we should relate to it now.”
Prof. Justin O’Connor, Monash University

“This study makes a significant contribution to scholarship on Australian theatre and, more broadly… to the global discussion about the vexed relationship between artists, creativity, government funding for the arts and cultural policy.”
Dr. Gillian Arrighi, The University of Newcastle, Australia