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Recognizing the vast numbers of old and young people alike that interact, socialize, and learn through gameplay, this book explores research approaches to games, their literacies, and the pedagogical possibilities of play. Consequentially, this volume is rooted in the idea that powerful forms of learning, communication, and multimodal production occur through and because of gaming. These profound literacy practices can mirror traditional literacies but the educational field’s approach to engaging in a pedagogy of playful literacies has been largely scattershot. By bringing together diverse voices, contexts, and research designs, the chapters in this volume present a snapshot of 21st century literacy practices at work and at play.

Organized into two parts, Studying Gaming Literacies explores the rich methodological approaches to gaming literacies scholarship as well as the possibilities of engaging in research in both classrooms and informal learning settings. With a robust set of context-specific approaches, this book acts less as a how-to manual for equity-driven scholarship than as a companion to support and undergird other research and pedagogical approaches to play and gaming in literacy-rich learning environments.

Focused on presenting scholarly approaches to gaming research, this volume, too, presents pedagogical takeaways for educators, for students, and for game designers and curators. Across the seven case studies presented in this volume, we call for intentional playful practices in educational research. The literacies of play are myriad and complex and – particularly in the name of educational equity – they demand to be studied, uplifted, and leveraged for academic achievement.

Contributors are: Jolynn Asato, Ali Carr-Chellman, Sebastián Castaño, Laura D’Aveta, Jennifer S. Dail, Jason Engerman, James Paul Gee, Robert Hein, Michael Hernandez, Ellen Middaugh, Raúl Alberto Mora , Shannon Mortimore-Smith, Tyrone Steven Orrego, Daniel Ramírez, Nate Turcotte, Shelbie Witte, and Jennifer Wyld.
Considerations for Implementing Gaming Literacies in the Classroom
The possibilities of gaming for transformative and equity-driven instructional teaching practice are more robust than ever before. And yet, support for designing playful learning opportunities are too often not addressed or taught in professional development or teacher education programs. Considering the complex demands in public schools today and the niche pockets of extracurricular engagement in which youth find themselves, Playing with Teaching serves as a hands-on resource for teachers and teacher educators. Particularly focused on how games – both digital and non-digital – can shape unique learning and literacy experiences for young people today, this book’s chapters look at numerous examples that educators can bring into their classrooms today.

By exploring how teachers can support literacy practices through gaming, this volume provides specific strategies for heightening literacy learning and playful experiences in classrooms. The classroom examples of gameful teaching described in each chapter not only provide practical examples of games and learning, but offer critical perspectives on why games in literacy classrooms matter today.

Through depictions of cutting-edge of powerful and playful pedagogy, this book is not a how-to manual. Rather, Playing with Teaching fills a much-needed space demonstrating how games are applied in classrooms today. It is an invitation to reimagine classrooms as spaces to newly investigate playful approaches to teaching and learning with adolescents. Roll the dice and give playful literacy instruction a try.

Contributors are: Jill Bidenwald, Jennifer S. Dail, Elizabeth DeBoeser, Antero Garcia, Kip Glazer, Emily Howell, Lindy L. Johnson, Rachel Kaminski Sanders, Jon Ostenson, Chad Sansing, and Shelbie Witte.
Engaged Pedagogy in the Japanese University
Offering a critical yet constructive response to the perceived crises in tertiary foreign language education in the Japanese university, the contributors to Bringing Forth a World provide theoretical and practical solutions which together act as a prolegomena to bringing forth a world. Theirs is an ecology of contribution in liberal arts education which takes responsibility for the care for youth, and contests intellectual passivity and indifference in foreign language instruction.

The editors proffer a transformative, engaged and multidisciplinary liberal arts pedagogy, one at odds with forms of lowest common denominator, one-size-fits-all, and standardized provision. In response to the prevalent business-dominated model, they demonstrate an applied format of multiliteracy theory—one with semiotic, multimodal, feminist dimensions—which is regionally specific and better accounts for divergent forms of human expression and perception. The writers not only take account of the intellectual and mental issues in the student demographic but also in the teaching profession which suffers from widespread anxiety, job insecurity and a lack of autonomy, experimentation and innovation.

Philosophically, the contributors to this book demand a form of meaning-making which is fundamentally social and creative, and which celebrates processes of ‘becoming-other’ in-between the student and teacher that seldom, if ever, follow a predictable trajectory. It is hoped that readers will embrace the spirit of the book, pick up its philosophical gauntlet to think otherwise than prevalent standardized models of teaching and learning, and therefore will use its core tenets to experiment with different ways of educating the youth of today.
It is now recognized that language teachers and learners are both users and creators of knowledge in socially, culturally, politically, materially complex, and unpredictable environments. With this in mind, an increasing number of researchers in Second Language Education have progressively broken away from traditional ways of studying educational practices to find novel, and more complex ways to conceptualize and study language teachers’ and learners’ teaching and learning practices and knowledge development.

This book is in line with these trends, and should be considered as the actualization of experimentations with novel ways to apprehend the interrelationships between language and education by drawing on the conceptual repertoire of French philosopher Gilles Deleuze and his collaborator Félix Guattari. To guide us through this reflexive journey ten scholars, specialized in the field of Second Language Education, call on their experiences as language educators and researchers to explore the intersections between language, teaching, learning, and research, focusing on the experiences of diverse populations (e.g. students, immigrants, teachers, etc.) in multiple settings (e.g. Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, universities, and family literacy intervention programs).

Through this book, new insights and lines of thought are generated on how research and educative practices can be transformed to reimagine second language teaching, learning, and research to think differently about the experiences of language teachers, learners, and researchers, and disrupt the processes that may prevent us from innovating and seizing future opportunities.

Contributors are: Francis Bangou, Maria Bastien-Valenca, Joff P. N. Bradley, Martina Emke, Douglas Fleming, Roumiana Ilieva, Brian Morgan, Enrica Piccardo, Aisha Ravindran, Gene Vasilopoulos and Monica Waterhouse.
The present volume, edited by Patricia Salazar-Campillo and Victòria Codina-Espurz, is a timely contribution to the field of interlanguage pragmatics. The nine chapters presented here expand the scope of research to date by including different contexts (i.e., formal instruction, stay-abroad, and online) and age groups which have received less attention (for example, young learners and adolescents). Whereas the speech act of requesting is the one that has been most explored in the field of interlanguage pragmatics, as attested by several chapters in the present volume, disagreements and directives are also tackled. This book embraces research addressing both elicited and naturally-occurring data in studies which deal with pragmatic use, development, and awareness.
Volume Editor: Anila Zainub
Decolonization and Anti-colonial Praxis presents research on contemporary forms of decolonization and anti-colonialism in practice. It pertains to the ways in which individuals, groups, and communities engage with the logic of epistemic colonial power within areas of citizenship, migration, education, Indigeneity, language, land struggle, and social work. The contributions in this edited volume empirically document the conceptual and bodily engagement of racialized and violated individuals and communities as they use anti-colonial principles to disrupt criminalizing institutional discourses and policies within various global imperial contexts.

The terms ‘Decolonization’ and ‘Anti-colonialism’ are used in diverse and interdisciplinary academic perspectives. They are researched upon and elaborated in necessary ways in the theoretical literature, however, it is rare to see these principles employed in applied forms. Decolonization and Anti-colonial Praxis provides a much needed contemporary and representative reclamation of these concepts from the standpoint of racialized communities. It explores the frameworks and methods rooted in their indigeneity, cultural history and memories to imagine a new future. The research findings and methodological tools presented in this book will be of interdisciplinary interest to teachers, graduate students and researchers.

Contributors are: Harriet Akanmori, Ayah Al Oballi, Sevgi Arslan, Jacqueline Benn-John, Lucy El-Sherif, Danielle Freitas, Pablo Isla Monsalve, Dionisio Nyaga, Hoda Samater, Rose Ann Torres, Umar Umangay, and Anila Zainub. 
Volume Editor: Jody L. McBrien
Since 2014, the international community has felt overwhelmed by refugees and asylum seekers searching for opportunities in which to rebuild their lives. Indeed, large numbers can result in turmoil and concern in resettlement countries and with national citizens. A climate of fear can result, especially if perpetuated by politicians and media that suggest negative effects resulting from immigration.

Caught in the crossfire of social and political disagreements about migration are children, most of whom are not included in decisions to leave their homelands. This edited book examines their academic challenges from the perspective of the six English-speaking refugee resettlement countries. Our hope is not only to compare challenges, but also to describe successes by which teachers and policymakers can consider new approaches to help refugee and asylum-seeking children.

Educational Policies and Practices of English-Speaking Refugee Resettlement Countries offers perspectives from established and new scholars examining educational situations for refugees and asylum seekers. The top three resettlement countries are the United States, Canada, and Australia. For its size, New Zealand is also proportionately a country of high resettlement. New to resettlement are the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. Thus, this collection includes wisdom from countries that began resettlement during World War Two as well as newcomers to the process. In 2018, UNHCR numbers of displaced people reached a record high of 68.5 million. Policymakers, teachers, social service providers, and the general public need to understand ways to help resettled refugees become productive members in their new countries of residence.

Contributors are: Samantha Arnold, Asih Asikin-Garmager, Melanie Baak, Sally Baker, Zhiyan Basharati, Briana Byers, Merike Darmody, Lucia Dore, Ain A. Grooms, Maria Hayward, Asher Hirsch, Amanda Hiorth, Caroline Lenette, Leslie Ann Locke, Duhita Mahatmya, Jody L. McBrien, Rory Mc Daid, Helen Murphy, Tara Ross, Jan Stewart, and Elizabeth P. Tonogbanua.
Editors: Nic Spaull and John Comings
Learning to read and write for meaning and pleasure are arguably the two most important competences that children acquire in primary school. Yet, in 2019 more than one half of children worldwide do not reach this first rung on the literacy ladder. Improving Early Literacy Outcomes aims to address this head-on, by foregrounding the work of more than 40 researchers, most of them living in, and working on, developing countries.
Their contributions illuminate, magnify, and discover anew the importance of improving early reading, through precise alignment of curriculum, teaching, and assessment, and with a special focus on some of the most under-studied countries in the world (e.g., Burkina Faso, Niger, and Senegal).
Through probing analyses of research, policy, and practice, the book highlights the common experiences of high aspirations repeatedly confronting harsh realities. Sixteen interconnected chapters cast an ever-vigilant and deflationary eye on the temptation to take an unrealistic approach to early literacy, and also caution against lumping all languages, contexts, and policy-challenges into a single heap.
This book provides an indispensable guide to policymakers, practitioners, educators, and academics working towards the realisation of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Improving the teaching, learning, and assessment of early grade literacy is key not only to expanding the quality, access, and equity of education, but also to unlocking all the other SDGs, and ultimately to driving development.
In every corner of the world, children are learning languages at home that differ from the dominant language used in their broader social world. These children arrive at school with a precious resource: their mother tongue. In the face of this resource and the possibility for biliteracy, majority language educational programs do nothing to support primary language competence. To counter monolingual education, there are significant albeit few initiatives around the world that provide formal support for children to continue to develop competence in their mother tongue, while also learning an additional language or languages. One such initiative is dual language immersion education (DLI).

Interestingly, most (if not all) research on DLI programs focus on the effectiveness of bilingual education vis-à-vis academic access and achievement. The ideologies embedded in the research and guidelines for DLI education, albeit necessary and critical during the early days of DLI schooling, are disconnected from the present realities, epistemologies, and humanness of our bilingual youth.

A Humanizing Dual Language Immersion Education envisions a framework informed by bilingual teachers and students who support biliteracy as a human right. Positioning bilingual education under a human rights framework addresses the basic right of our bi/multilingual youth to human dignity. Respect for the languages of persons belonging to different linguistic communities is essential for a just and democratic society. Given the centrality of language to our sense of who we are and where we fit in the broader world, a connection between linguistic human rights and bilingual education is essential.
The canon, as much an ideology as it is a body of texts perceived to be intrinsic to the high school English classroom, has come under scrutiny for maintaining status quo narratives about whiteness, masculinity, heterosexuality, ability, and even those associated with American ideals of self-reliance, the good life, and the self-made man. Teaching practices around these texts may also reinforce harmful practices and ways of thinking, including those connected to notions of culture, literary merit, and methods of reading, teaching, and learning.

Teaching the Canon in 21st Century Classrooms offers innovative, critical ways of reading, thinking about, and teaching canonical texts in 21st century classrooms. Responding to the increasingly pluralized, digitized, global 21st century English classroom, chapter authors make explicit the ideologies of a canonical text of focus, while also elaborating a pedagogical approach that de-centers the canon, bridges past and present, applies critical theory, and celebrates the rich identities of 21st century readers. In using this book, teachers will be especially poised to take on the canon in their classroom and, thus, to open up their curricula to ideas, values, concerns, and narratives beyond those embedded in the canonical texts.