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Maps in Newspapers

Approaches of Study and Practices in Portraying War since 19th Century

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André Reyes Novaes

Maps in newspapers generated many discussions among cartographers and geographers working from different approaches and theoretical backgrounds. This work examines these maps from a historiographical as well as a historical perspective. It considers three main questions, namely how maps in the press should be conceptualized, how cartographic images in newspapers have been studied, and how these images changed over time. In order to provide a perspective on the origins, development, and impact of war maps in the press, we will explore maps representing three geopolitical conflicts for Brazilian audiences: The War of the Triple Alliance (1864–1870), the World War II (1939–1945) and the War on Drugs in Rio de Janeiro’s favelas (1994–2010). By exploring maps on these wars, we will identify specific cartographic practices used in this genre as well as the connections that this mode has with other types of map production and consumption.

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Edited by Alain Delattre, Marie Legendre and Petra Sijpesteijn

Authority and Control in the Countryside looks at the economic, religious, political and cultural instruments that local and regional powers in the late antique to early medieval Mediterranean and Near East used to manage their rural hinterlands. Measures of direct control – land ownership, judicial systems, garrisons and fortifications, religious and administrative appointments, taxes and regulation – and indirect control – monuments and landmarks, cultural styles and artistic models, intellectual and religious influence, and economic and bureaucratic standard-setting – are examined to reconstruct the various means by which authority was asserted over the countryside. Unified by its thematic and spatial focus, this book offers an array of interdisciplinary approaches, allowing for important comparisons across a wide but connected geographical area in the transition from the Sasanian and Roman to the Islamic period. Contributors: Arezou Azad and Hugh Kennedy, Sobhi Bouderbala, Michele Campopiano, Alain Delattre, Jessica Ehinger, Simon Ford, James Howard-Johnston, Elif Keser-Kayaalp, Marie Legendre, Javier Martínez Jiménez, Harry Munt, Annliese Nef and Vivien Prigent, Marion Rivoal and Marie-Odile Rousset, Gesa Schenke, Petra Sijpesteijn, Peter Verkinderen, Luke Yarbrough, Khaled Younes.

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Edited by Genevieve Sartor

James Joyce and Genetic Criticism presents contemporary scholarship in genetic criticism and Joyce studies. In considering how evolutionary themes enhance the definition of the genetic method in interpreting texts, this volume presents a variety of manuscript-based analyses that engage how textual meaning, through addition and omission, grows. In doing so, this volume covers a wide-range of topics concerning Joycean genetics, some of which include Joyce’s editorial practice, the forthcoming revised edition of Finnegans Wake, the genetic relationship between Giacomo Joyce and Ulysses, the method and approach required for creating an online archive of Finnegans Wake, and the extensive genesis of “Penelope”.

Contributors are: Shinjini Chattopadhyay, Tim Conley, Luca Crispi, Robbert-Jan Henkes, Sangam MacDuff, Genevieve Sartor, Fritz Senn, Sam Slote, Dirk Van Hulle.

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Edited by Ronan Crowley and Dirk Van Hulle

New Quotatoes, Joycean Exogenesis in the Digital Age offers fourteen original essays on the genetic dossiers of Joyce’s fiction and the ties that bind the literary archive to the transatlantic print sphere of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. Availing of digital media and tools, online resources, and new forms of access, the contributions delve deeper than ever before into Joyce’s programmatic reading for his oeuvre, and they posit connections and textual relations with major and minor literary figures alike never before established. The essays employ a broad range of genetic methodologies from ‘traditional’ approaches to intertextuality and allusion to computational methods that plumb Large-scale Digitisation Initiatives like Google Books to the possibilities of databasing for Joyce studies.

Contributors: Scarlett Baron, Tim Conley, Luca Crispi, Ronan Crowley, Sarah Davison, Tom De Keyser, Daniel Ferrer, Finn Fordham, Robbert-Jan Henkes, John Simpson, Sam Slote, Dirk Van Hulle, Chrissie Van Mierlo, and Wim Van Mierlo.

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Angela Nuovo

This work offers the first English-language survey of the book industry in Renaissance Italy. Whereas traditional accounts of the book in the Renaissance celebrate authors and literary achievement, this study examines the nuts and bolts of a rapidly expanding trade that built on existing economic practices while developing new mechanisms in response to political and religious realities. Approaching the book trade from the perspective of its publishers and booksellers, this archive-based account ranges across family ambitions and warehouse fires to publishers' petitions and convivial bookshop conversation. In the process it constructs a nuanced picture of trading networks, production, and the distribution and sale of printed books, a profitable but capricious commodity.

Originally published in Italian as Il commercio librario nell’Italia del Rinascimento (Milan: Franco Angeli, 1998; second, revised ed., 2003), this present English translation has not only been updated but has also been deeply revised and augmented.

Written Culture in a Colonial Context

Africa and the Americas 1500 - 1900

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Edited by Adrien Delmas and Nigel Penn

Recent developments in the cultural history of written culture have omitted the specificity of practices relative to writing that were anchored in colonial contexts. The circulation of manuscripts and books between different continents played a key role in the process of the first globalization from the 16th century onwards. While the European colonial organization mobilised several forms of writing and tried to control the circulation and reception of this material, the very function and meaning of written culture was recreated by the introduction and appropriation of written culture into societies without alphabetical forms of writing. This book explores the extent to which the control over the materiality of writing has shaped the numerous and complex processes of cultural exchange during the early modern period.

Ryan Twomey

'The Child is Father of the Man'discusses the field of nineteenth-century Juvenilia. Specifically, the development of the child writer into the adult author, arguing for increased critical attention toward the early works of now famous writers.
The introductory chapter reviews the role of juvenilia in the writing progression of famous authors and provides a discussion of current academic scholarship in the field of juvenilia. The book then focuses on the individual literary progressions of the nineteenth-century British writers William Harrison Ainsworth, Emily Brontë, and George Eliot, and the Anglo-Irish writer, Maria Edgeworth. The analysis in each chapter has been contextualised within the historical, regional, gothic and lyric modes, and includes an interdisciplinary study in the fields of history, biography, and languages and linguistics. Each chapter is provided as an individual case study espousing the importance of the juvenilia on the development of the later, more publicised, authorship. The concluding chapter discusses the future of the genre with reference to the discoveries outlined in the text, and juxtaposes these findings with the perceived neglect juvenilia has received from the academic community.

Women in Revolutionary Debate

Female Novelists from Burney to Austen

Stephanie Russo

In the later eighteenth and earlier nineteenth centuries novels were believed to have the power to shape and/or change behaviour, and, by implication, affect the political landscape of society on a large scale. The English response to the French Revolution can be traced through a reading of the novels of the period. The French Revolution in itself was indelibly associated with the domestic arena, and, thus, by extension, with women. Again and again in novels of the period, and particularly in women's novels, the stability, or otherwise, of the family reflects the stability of government and of the nation. It was through the medium of the novel that women could enter the debate on revolution, using their novels as means through which to explore many of the dominant social and political issues of the day.
The novel, more often than not set in the family home, was a medium uniquely suited to an exploration of revolutionary ideologies in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. The emerging form of the novel offered a unique opportunity for women to present new, challenging perspectives on the revolutionary crisis of the 1790s. The works of Frances Burney, Charlotte Smith, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Robinson, Maria Edgeworth, Mrs Bullock and Jane Austen, all occupy an important place in this debate, and indeed, in the history of the novel. They demonstrate that women were at the forefront of development of the form of the novel itself.

Manuscript Studies in the Low Countries

Proceedings of the 'Groninger Codicologendagen' in Friesland, 2002

Edited by Anne Margreet W. As-Vijvers, Jos M.M. Hermans and Gerda C. Huisman

Volume 3 of the Boekhistorische Reeks contains the proceedings of the ‘Groninger Codicologendagen in Friesland’, the quadrennial conference on Netherlandish manuscript studies, which in 2002 was held at the Fryske Akademy in Leewarden.

The rich contents of this book reflect the two major conference themes, Books and Teaching, and the Art of Manuscript Illumination. International scholars in these fields investigate both subjects from various angles.

Papers included in the first section offer glimpses of medieval school life, the role of schoolboys in the production of manuscripts and printed books, the use of books by medieval surgeons, the pecia-system to produce manuscripts, and the importance of manuscripts for early modern scholarship.

In the second section the focus is on the state of research and new inquiries in Netherlandish manuscript illumination. Miniatures, border decoration, scribes and workshop practices are the subjects of studies ranging from the Moerdrecht Masters, active in the second quarter of the fifteenth century, to Ghent-Bruges illuminators in the beginning of the sixteenth century, and from mass-produced books of hours to luxurious, secular manuscripts made for members of the Bourgundian court.

In the third part some current book-historical projects are presented, which cover a broad range of important research tools that are now available through the Internet, both for specialists as well as book lovers.

Edited by Peter C.J. van der Krogt

Matching pair of terrestrial and celestial globes, with a diameter of 26 inches (68 cm), with text in Latin. The terrestial globe is composed of 36 half gores and two polar calottes; the celestial globe of 24 ecliptical gores. The gores are pasted on a plaster sphere rotating on brass pinions within a brass meridian ring incised with a graduated scale. Each globe is set into a matching seventeenth-century Dutch wooden base with a small wooden compass-box mounted on the base-plate and with the horizon ring covered scales, almanac and calendar, etc..., engraved on paper and handcoloured as originally issued. Salescatalogue.