Rainer Liedtke

Wie »jüdisch« waren wirtschaftliche Aktivitäten von Juden?
Ausgehend von dieser Leitfrage stellt der Band dar, wie sich die Berufsfelder, die ökonomische Lage und das wirtschaftliche Handeln von Juden seit dem 18. Jahrhundert veränderten und welche Auswirkungen dies auf ihre Integration in die Gesamtgesellschaft hatte. Durch einen Blick auf jüdische Wohltätigkeit und Philanthropie werden die Ungleichheiten des rapiden wirtschaftlichen Aufstiegs des jüdischen Bürgertums seit der Mitte des 19. Jahrhundert betrachtet. Dieser Aufstieg steht in einem starken Kontrast zu den zahlreichen Anfeindungen aufgrund angeblicher wirtschaftlicher jüdischer Dominanz, die ebenso thematisiert werden wie die Ausplünderung der Juden im Nationalsozialismus. Der Band schließt mit einer Darstellung der sogenannten Wiedergutmachung und der Probleme bei der Restitution jüdischer Vermögen. Auch die Entwicklung der Wirtschaftsbeziehungen zwischen Israel und der Bundesrepublik Deutschland wird thematisiert.

Generaloberst Dietl

Eine Biographie

Winfried Heinemann

Die Welt im Kalten Krieg

Internationale Beziehungen 1945-1989

Günther Kronenbitter, Heinz Schilling, Winfried Baumgart, Klaus Malettke, Alfred Kohler, Franz Knipping, Friedrich Kießling and Michael Erbe

Zwischen Schein und Sein

Die Magieproblematik aus der Perspektive früher Hochkulturen

Hubert Roeder and Frank Roegke

Edited by Hubert Roeder and Frank Röpke

Inwieweit ist »Magie« eine tragfähige Kategorie für Altertumswissenschaften? Kann die Ägyptologie ohne einen solchen Begriff auskommen? Was vermag eine solche Kategorie für die Erforschung neuzeitlich-moderner Texte zu leisten?
Vorbelastet durch die ethisch-religiösen Ideale der antiken Traditionen ist »Magie« eine ebenso populäre wie diffuse Kategorie. Obwohl die jüngere Forschung betont, dass es sich bei »Magie« nur bedingt um eine eigenständige operative Kategorie handelt und die Rede davon oftmals nur ein Zugeständnis an den konventionellen Sprachgebrauch ist, wird »Magie« in der Ägyptologie und anderen Altertumswissenschaften weiterhin inflationär und undifferenziert bemüht. Ziel des vorliegenden Tagungsbandes ist eine kritische interdisziplinäre Diskussion insbesondere des traditionellen ägyptologischen Magiebegriffes.

War and Memorials

The Second World War and Beyond

Edited by Frank Jacob and Kenneth Pearl

With the end of the Second World War, all its violence, war crimes, and sufferings as well as the atomic threat of the Cold War period, societies began to gradually remember wars in a different way. The glorious or honorable element of the age of nationalism was trans-formed into a rather dunning one, while peace movements demanded an end of war itself.
To analyze these changes and to show how war was remembered after the end of the Second World War, the present volume assembles the work of international specialists who deal with this particular question from different national and international perspectives. The contributions analyze the role of soldiers, perpetrators, and victims of different conflicts, including the Second World War. They show which motivational settings led to the erection of war memorials reflecting the values and historical traditions of the second half of the 20th and the 21st centuries. Thus, this interdisciplinary volume explores how war is commemorated and how its actors and victims are perceived around the globe.

War and Memorials

The Age of Nationalism and the Great War

Edited by Frank Jacob and Kenneth Pearl

War Memorials were an important element of nation building, for the invention of traditions, and the establishment of historical traditions. Especially nationalist remembrance in the late 19th century and the memory of the First World War stimulated a memorial boom in the period which the present book is focusing on.
The remembrance of war is nothing particularly new in history, since victories in decisive battles had been of interest since ancient times. However, the age of nationalism and the First World War triggered a new level of war remembrance that was expressed in countless memorials all over the world. The present volume presents the research of international specialists from different disciplines within the Humanities, whose research is dealing with the role of war memorials for the remembrance of conflicts like the First World War and their perceptions within the analyzed societies. It will be shown how memorials – in several different chronological and geographical contexts – were used to remember the dead, remind the survivors, and warn the descendants.

Edited by Kirill Dmitriev, Julia Hauser and Bilal Orfali

Insatiable Appetite: Food as Cultural Signifier in the Middle East and Beyond explores the cultural ramifications of food and foodways in the Mediterranean, and Arab-Muslim countries in particular. The volume addresses the cultural meanings of food from a wider chronological scope, from antiquity to present, adopting approaches from various disciplines, including classical Greek philology, Arabic literature, Islamic studies, anthropology, and history. The contributions to the book are structured around six thematic parts, ranging in focus from social status to religious prohibitions, gender issues, intoxicants, vegetarianism, and management of scarcity.

Perspectives on Evil

From Banality to Genocide

Series:

Edited by Kanta Dihal

The question of evil is one of the oldest and most intensely studied topics in intellectual history. In fiction, legend and mythology the boundary between good and evil is often depicted as clear-cut, at least to the reader or listener, who is supposed to understand such tales as lessons and warnings. Evil is something that must be avoided by the hero in some cases and vanquished in others; it is either the exact opposite of the expected good behaviour, or its complete absence. Even so, for the characters in these didactic fictions, it turns out to be deceptively easy to fall to the infernal, ‘dark’ side. The chapters in this volume share a common thread – they all engage with ‘real’ evil: events and deeds of an evil nature that have been lived in the (recent) past and have become part of history, rather than fictional evil.

Roads Through Mwinilunga

A History of Social Change in Northwest Zambia

Series:

Iva Peša

Roads through Mwinilunga provides a historical appraisal of social change in Northwest Zambia from 1750 until the present. By looking at agricultural production, mobility, consumption, and settlement patterns, existing explanations of social change are reassessed. Using a wide range of archival and oral history sources, Iva Peša shows the relevance of Mwinilunga to broader processes of colonialism, capitalism, and globalisation. Through a focus on daily life, this book complicates transitions from subsistence to market production and dichotomies between tradition and modernity. Roads through Mwinilunga is a crucial addition to debates on historical and social change in Central Africa.

War and Sexual Violence

New Perspectives in a New Era

Edited by Sarah K. Danielsson

In the #MeToo era, the scourge of sexual violence in society has come into new focus. It has become clear that women and men have been, and are, victimized to an extent that many had previously not realized. But this invisibility has largely been aided by a history of silencing victims and of impunity for perpetrators.
Wartime and military sexual violence has similar patterns of invisibility, silence and impunity. Furthermore, sexual violence in wartime and beyond is a phenomenon that cannot be divorced from broader social, economic and political issues.
It is this dual focus on sexual violence itself and its contexualization that lies at the heart of this volume. This volume probes new directions in understanding sexual violence during conflict, as well as analyzing ethnicity, masculinity and their relationships to sexual violence.