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The Veiled God

Friedrich Schleiermacher’s Theology of Finitude

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Ruth Jackson Ravenscroft

In The Veiled God, Ruth Jackson Ravenscroft offers a detailed portrait of Friedrich Schleiermacher’s early life, ethics, and theology in its historical and social context. She also critically reflects on the enduring relevance of his work for the study of religion.
The book analyses major texts from Schleiermacher’s early work. It argues that his experiments with literary form convey his understanding that human knowledge is inherently social, and that religion is thoroughly linguistic and historical. The book contends that by making finitude (and not freedom) a universal aspect to human life, Schleiermacher offers rich conceptual resources for considering what it means to be human in this world, both in relations of difference to others, and in relation to the infinite.

Edited by Josefina Rodríguez-Arribas, Charles Burnett, Silke Ackermann and Ryan Szpiech

First published as a special issue of the journal Medieval Encounters (vol. 23, 2017), this volume, edited by Josefina Rodríguez-Arribas, Charles Burnett, Silke Ackermann, and Ryan Szpiech, brings together fifteen studies on various aspects of the astrolabe in medieval cultures. The astrolabe, developed in antiquity and elaborated throughout the Middle Ages, was used for calculation, teaching, and observation, and also served astrological and medical purposes. It was the most popular and prestigious of the mathematical instruments, and was found equally among practitioners of various sciences and arts as among princes in royal courts. By considering sources and instruments from Muslim, Christian, and Jewish contexts, this volume provides state-of-the-art research on the history and use of the astrolabe throughout the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Silke Ackermann, Emilia Calvo, John Davis, Laura Fernández Fernández, Miquel Forcada, Azucena Hernández, David A. King, Taro Mimura, Günther Oestmann, Josefina Rodríguez-Arribas, Sreeramula Rajeswara Sarma, Petra G. Schmidl, Giorgio Strano, Flora Vafea, and Johannes Thomann.

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Edited by Sjef Houppermans, Manet van Montfrans, Annelies Schulte Nordholt, Sabine van Wesemael and Nell de Hullu-van Doeselaar

Ce volume comporte un dossier sur la thématique de l’argent dans A la recherche du temps perdu. Chez Proust, l’argent est beaucoup plus que l’argent, il devient véhicule de passion, de pulsion, d’excès. Loin de se limiter à la dimension sociologique du roman, il joue un rôle à d’autres niveaux : esthétique, imaginaire mais surtout affectif, dans le motif récurrent du don. Dans une série de huit études, le dossier éclaire les diverses facettes de cet imaginaire de l’argent, qui s’infiltre dans les relations humaines ainsi que dans l’art.
Dans la section mélanges, on trouvera des études sur le Paris proustien, sur les objets et les arts décoratifs dans la Recherche et sur l’amitié de Proust avec Robert de Flers.

The greater part of this issue is devoted to the topic of money in the Recherche. In Proust’s work, money is so much more, it is the vehicle of passions, impulses and excess. Apart from its sociological references, money plays a role at other levels of the novel: the aesthetic, the imaginary and above all the affective dimension, with the recurrent motive of gift. With a series of eight studies, the present issue throws a light on this imaginary of money, which infuses human relations and art.
The Miscellanea section includes studies about Proust’s Paris, about art objects and decorative arts in the Recherche and on Proust’s friendship with Robert de Flers.

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Edited by Emma O’Donnell Polyakov

Antisemitism, Islamophobia, and Interreligious Hermeneutics: Ways of Seeing the Religious Other, edited by Emma O’Donnell Polyakov, examines the hermeneutics of interreligious encounter in contexts of conflict. It investigates the implicit judgments of Judaism and Islam that often arise in response to these conflicts, and explores the implications of these interpretations for relations between Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Addressing antisemitism and Islamophobia through the tools of interreligious hermeneutics, this volume brings together three distinct discourses: the study of ancient and new tropes of antisemitism as they appear in today’s world; research into contemporary expressions of fear or suspicion of Islam; and philosophical reflections on the hermeneutics of interreligious encounters.

Martin Buber

His Intellectual and Scholarly Legacy

Edited by Sam Berrin Shonkoff

Martin Buber: His Intellectual and Scholarly Legacy is a collection of contemporary reflections on one of the most pivotal figures of modern Jewish thought. Born in Austria and reared in Galicia, Buber (1878-1965) became a spiritual representative of Judaism in German culture before emigrating to Jerusalem on the brink of the Shoah. His prolific writings on matters spanning the Hebrew Bible and New Testament to Hasidism and Zionism inspired diverse audiences throughout the world. In this volume, Sam Berrin Shonkoff has curated an illuminating array of essays on Buber’s thought by leading intellectuals from five different countries. Their treatments of Buber’s dialogues with Christianity, politics, philosophy, and Judaism exhibit Buber’s ramified legacy and will surely stimulate fruitful discussion in our own time.

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Edited by Hava Tirosh-Samuelson and Aaron W. Hughes

Michael L. Morgan is an Emeritus Chancellor Professor at Indiana University and the Senator Jerahmiel S. and Carole S. Grafstein Visiting Chair in Jewish Philosophy at the University of Toronto. On the faculty of Indiana University for his entire career, he has also held Visiting Professorships at the Australian Catholic University, Northwestern University, Princeton University, Stanford University, and Yale University. A historian of philosophy informed by the continental and analytic philosophical traditions, Morgan has reflected on the key challenge of our day: how is objectivity possible in light of the historicity of human life? An interpreter of both “Athens” and “Jerusalem,” Morgan has written on ancient Greek philosophy, modern Jewish philosophy, post-Holocaust theology and ethics, Zionism, and Messianism.

Edited by Mercedes García-Arenal, Gerard A. Wiegers and Ryan Szpiech

This book discusses the “long fifteenth century” in Iberian history, between the 1391 pogroms and the forced conversions of Aragonese Muslims in 1526, a period characterized by persecutions, conversions and social violence, on the one hand, and cultural exchange, on the other. It was a historical moment of unstable religious ideas and identities, before the rigid turn taken by Spanish Catholicism by the middle of the sixteenth century; a period in which the physical and symbolic borders separating the three religions were transformed and redefined but still remained extraordinarily porous. The collection argues that the aggressive tone of many polemical texts has until now blinded historiography to the interconnected nature of social and cultural intimacy, above all in dialogue and cultural transfer in later medieval Iberia.
Contributors are Ana Echevarría, Gad Freudenthal, Mercedes García-Arenal, Maria Laura Giordano, Yonatan Glazer-Eytan, Eleazar Gutwirth, Felipe Pereda, Rosa M. Rodríguez Porto, Katarzyna K. Starczewska, John Tolan, Gerard Wiegers, and Yosi Yisraeli.

Marcel Proust, roman moderne:

perspectives comparatistes

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Edited by Vincent Ferré and Raffaello Rossi

Proust et le roman moderne, perspectives comparatistes a pour origine un colloque organisé en juin 2015 à l’université Paris Est Créteil, pour conclure un programme associant des chercheurs venus de toute l’Europe pour croiser langues et disciplines en confrontant lectures et interprétations de l’œuvre proustienne par des écrivains contemporains ou modernes (Salinas, Bon, Beckett…), en comparant Proust et Genet, Barnes, Cohen, Pessoa, Joyce ou Kafka ; ou réfléchir à sa relation à Ruskin, aux questions philosophiques soulevées par cette œuvre… Autant de « perspectives comparatistes » sur la manière dont l'histoire du roman proustien se dessine aujourd’hui, au gré des réceptions et des réécritures.

Proust et le roman moderne, perspectives comparatistes has its origins in a conference that took place at Paris Est Créteil University (France), in June 2015 as a conclusion to an international program: scholars from all over Europe, combining languages and disciplines, confronted readings and interpretations of A la Recherche by modernist and contemporary writers (such as Salinas, Bon and Beckett), comparing Proust and Genet, Barnes, Cohen, Pessoa, Joyce and Kafka; but also reexamining classical issues such as Proust’s relation to Ruskin and philosophical questions raised by his novel… These “comparatist perspectives” shed a light on the continuing history and reception of A la Recherche.

Modern Jewish Art

Definitions, Problems, and Opportunities

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Ori Soltes

In Modern Jewish Art: Definitions, Problems, and Opportunities, Ori Z. Soltes considers both the emerging and evolving discussion on, and the expanding array of practitioners of ‘Jewish art’ in the past two hundred years. He notes the developing problem of how to define ‘Judaism’ in the 19th century—as a religion, a culture, a race, a nation, a people—and thus the complications for placing ‘Jewish art’ under the extended umbrella of ‘religion and the arts.’ The fluidity with which one must engage the subject is reflected in the broadening conceptual and visual vocabulary, the extended range of subject foci and media, and the increasingly rich analytical approaches to the subject that have surfaced particularly in the past fifty years. Well-known and little-known artists are included in a far-ranging discussion of painting, sculpture, photography, video, installations, ceremonial objects, and works that blur the boundaries between categories.

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Jakob W. Wirén

In Hope and Otherness, Jakob Wirén analyses the place and role of the religious Other in contemporary eschatology. In connection with this theme, he examines and compares different levels of inclusion and exclusion in Christian, Muslim, and Jewish eschatologies. He argues that a distinction should be made in approaches to this issue between soteriological openness and eschatological openness. By going beyond Christian theology and also looking to Muslim and Jewish sources and by combining the question of the religious Other with eschatology, Wirén explores ways of articulating Christian eschatology in light of religious otherness, and provides a new and vital slant to the threefold paradigm of exclusivism, inclusivism and pluralism that has been prevalent in the theology of religions.

“Jakob Wirén’s study pushes forward the frontiers of three disciplines all at the same time: theology of religions; comparative religions and eschatology. (…) This is a challenging and important book.”
- Gavin D'Costa, University of Bristol, Professor of Catholic Theology, 2017

“This book explores of the status of religious others in Christian eschatology, and of eschatology itself as a privileged place for reflecting on religious otherness. Wiren mines not only Christian, but also Jewish and Muslim sources to develop an inclusive eschatology. Hope and Otherness thus represents an important contribution to both theology of religions and comparative theology.”
- Catherine Cornille, Boston College, Professor of Comparative Theology, 2017