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Editor: Suad Joseph
A unique collaboration of over 1000 scholars from around the world, the Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures crosses history, geographic borders and disciplines to create a ground-breaking reference work reflecting the very latest research on gender studies and the Islamic world.
No other reference work offers this scale of contributions or depth and breadth of coverage.
Since its publication, Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures is the essential reference work for students and researchers in the fields of gender studies, Middle Eastern and Islamic studies, as well as scholars of religion, history, politics, anthropology, geography and related disciplines.
This encyclopedia consists of six volumes (including an Index volume), published from 2003 to 2007.

The Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures is also available online. For more information see Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures Online. There are yearly updates with new articles for the online version.

As of 2020, EWIC is supplemented by the Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures 2010-2020. The EWIC 2010-2020 consist of all new entries on ground-breaking contemporary research topics, such as social media, security regimes, cinema, diaspora studies, Hip-Hop & Rap, Queer movements, Islamophobia and masculinity. EWIC 2010-2020 collects all the articles from ten years of Encyclopedia of Women & Islamic Cultures Online, into a nine-volume set – eight volumes of articles and one volume for the collective index. EWIC 2010-2020 offers 289 articles, written by 292 authors, covering 126 topics. Cumulatively, this is nearly two million words.
On his death, Felix Jacoby left uncompleted the original plan for his massive and now standard compilation: Die Fragmente der griechischen Historiker. Not only was he unable to complete his commentary to Volume III C, but no parts of three whole sections foreseen in the original plan were ever published.
Jacoby did however leave behind a considerable Nachlass of more than 1200 pages of notes and outlines relating to his commentary to FGrHist Volume III C. Charles Fornara is undertaking the task of publishing in fascicles Jacoby's text (sometimes with minor modifications), making additions of his own (between brackets). In writing this commentary Professor Fornara has tried to follow the stylistic conventions which Jacoby preferred and has done his best to emulate his general approach. This first part of the work deals with Graeco-Egyptian sources (Nos. 608a-665). Once this is completed, Professor Fornara will write a general introduction to the Graeco-Egyptian segment, including part of what Jacoby had written. It is anticipated that the work will comprise 8 fascicles and will be completed before 2005.
An international venture is now also underway to prepare and publish two of the sections which Jacoby had planned but never managed to publish.
Part IV (Biography, history of literature and antiquarian literature) will be undertaken by a team including J. Bollansee (Leuven), K. Brodersen (Muenchen), J. Engels (Cologne), A. Henrichs (Cambridge, Mass.), E. Krummen (Zuerich), G.A. Lehmann (Goettingen), H.-G. Nesselrath (Bern), J. Radicke (Koeln), J. Raeymaekers (Leuven), G. Schepens (Leuven), and E. Schuetrumpf (Boulder, Colorado). The first fascicles can be expected in the course of 1999.
Part V (historical geography) is to be coordinated by a working group of the Ernst-Kirsten-Gesellschaft, comprising H.-J. Gehrke (Freiburg) as spokesperson, with P. Funke (Muenster), E. Olshausen (Stuttgart), F. Prontera (Perugia).
Furthermore a group working under Prof. G. Schepens (Leuven) has undertaken to prepare a full index to the existing volumes of FGrH. This will be ready at the end of the 1990s.
The work will be published in fascicles in a temporary paper binding. A cloth binding will be made available with the last fascicle.

This volume contains a complete collection of the fragments of the Greek biographers of the Imperial times as well as of the undated authors.
Apart from the Greek text, it also includes an English translation of the testimonies and fragments, and provides a rich commentary, making it a useful instrument both for scholars and students.
Editorial Board / Council Member: Thomas Wortmann, Schamma Schahadat, and Cornelia Ruhe
Die Reihe versammelt Beiträge zu Theorie, Geschichte und Ästhetik der Medien. Im Zentrum sollen dabei die Beziehungen zwischen Medien, Kultur und Gesellschaft in synchroner und diachroner Perspektive stehen: Gefragt wird einerseits nach der kulturellen Formung von Medien sowie ihrer ästhetischen Faktur. In den Blick kommt andererseits das Wechselspiel zwischen Reaktion, Reflexion und Initiierung kultureller und gesellschaftlicher Prozesse in und durch Medien. Grundlage der Auseinandersetzung bildet die Verknüpfung von medien- und kulturwissenschaftlicher Theorie.
Die Reihe ist getragen von der Idee, dass unter dem Begriff der Medienkulturwissenschaft unterschiedliche geisteswissenschaft-
liche Disziplinen ihr Interesse an der Materialität von Kommunikation und der Medialität ästhetischer Artefakte bündeln können. Das Spektrum der zu analysierenden Medien ist daher bewusst breit gefasst: Es reicht von Film, Fotografie und Fernsehen über Literatur, Musik, Theater und Medienkunst bis zur Internet Art. Studien zu einzelnen Medien, Genres und Künstler:innen sind ebenso willkommen wie kultur- und medienvergleichend angelegte Projekte.
This series publishes contributions on the theory, history and aesthetics of media. Key focal points are the synchronic and diachronic relations between media, culture and society. The cultural formation of media and their aesthetic composition will be explored, whilst at the same time delving into the interplay between reaction, reflection and initiation of cultural and societal processes within and by media. The intersection between media and cultural studies theories serves as the starting point for this approach. The series is based on the idea that different disciplines in the humanities can unite their interest in the materiality of communication and the mediality of aesthetic artifacts under the concept of media cultural studies. The scope of media to be analyzed is deliberately broad by design. It ranges from film and photography through television, music, literature and theater to media and internet art. Studies about single media, genres and artists are just as welcome as projects utilizing a comparative approach to culture and media.
Brill’s Third Edition of the globally respected Encyclopaedia of Islam (EI3), the preeminent reference work in the field, began publication in the spring of 2007. EI3 is an entirely new work, which rigorously maintains the comprehensiveness and reliability of the great multivolume set, with new articles reflecting the great diversity of current scholarship. The EI3 appears in substantial parts each year, both online and in print. The new scope includes comprehensive coverage of Islam in the twentieth century, attention to Muslim minorities all over the world, full attention to social science as well as humanistic perspectives.

For the Encyclopaedia of Islam Online, please go to the website Brill Online.

The series published five volumes in 2017.
Editor: Ayman Shihadeh
The Islamic Translation Series aims to make scholarly Arabic texts from a wide range of disciplines available to an international, English-language readership. Comprising parallel English-Arabic texts, volumes in this series are suitable for specialists, students and all those interested in the intellectual traditions of the Islamic world.

This series was previously published by Brigham Young University Press.
Winner of the 2021 Sheikh Hamad Award for Translation and International Understanding (category: translation from Arabic into English)

This is an unabridged, annotated, translation of the great Damascene savant and saint Ibn Qayyim al-Jawziyya’s (d. 751/1350) Madārij al-Sālikīn. Conceived as a critical commentary on an earlier Sufi classic by the great Hanbalite scholar Abū Ismāʿīl of Herat, Madārij aims to rejuvenate Sufism’s Qurʾanic foundations. The original work was a key text for the Sufi initiates, composed in terse, rhyming prose as a master’s instruction to the aspiring seeker on the path to God, in a journey of a hundred stations whose ultimate purpose was to be lost to one’s self (fanāʾ) and subsist (baqāʾ) in God. The translator, Ovamir (ʿUwaymir) Anjum, provides an extensive introduction and annotation to this English-Arabic face-to-face presentation of this masterpiece of Islamic psychology.