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Series Editor: Immanuel Ness
Studies in Political Economy of Global Labor and Work is a peer-reviewed book series that explores the historical development and transformation of workers’ organizations, trade unions, and class conflict in the broader context of the changing global capitalist political economy. The series also investigates how workers are responding to the proliferation of neo-liberal ideas and institutions that are resistant to labor organizing and social democracy. Thus, the series welcomes volumes on global movements related to changes in the work process, industrial restructuring, labor law, migration and immigration, financialization, imperialism and workers’ struggles, as well as autonomism and syndicalism, insurrections, general strikes, and other responses to globalizing capitalism that shape labor movements.

Studies in Political Economy of Global Labor and Work examines the character of work in the contemporary world while paying particular attention to the effects of economic restructuring, immigration, and anti-labor political forces on the capacity of unions and the labor movement to represent, defend, and empower workers. The series also examines how political institutions, businesses, and labor organizations in the Global North and South have shaped worker power on the job and in society. The premise of this series is the well-established and broadly acknowledged assessment that worker power has drastically declined as multinational capitalist corporations and international institutions forge neo-liberal economic policies and that the erosion of worker power more broadly erodes social democracy as corporate interests gain greater control over economic and political power. The volumes in the series examine contemporary labor in the world through an array of lenses from across the social sciences, including gender, class, race, sexuality, religion, language, and nationality.

Manuscripts should be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs and edited collections.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Associate Editor Athina Dimitriou.

Authors will find general proposal guidelines at the Brill Author Gateway.

Please take a moment to visit the related Journal of Labor and Society

In Western ecumenical research, the perception of Orthodox theology still suffers from the stereotype of representing a solidified traditionalism. In contrast, Orthodox theology is dominated by the clichéd notion of Western Christianity as modernism contrary to tradition. This overlooks the many interesting and novel research approaches. On the one hand, these are developed at orthodox institutions worldwide in response to modern scientific questions, and on the other hand they reveal the continuity of the Christian heritage in change in Protestant and Catholic drafts. The series aims to provide a forum for these research approaches and thus enrich the ecumenical discussion with contributions that have been written from a culturally and religiously different background. The series focuses on monographs, but is also open to inter- and transdisciplinary scholarly anthologies. It accepts contributions in German, English and French. All manuscripts are peer-reviewed.
Salo W. Baron was considered the greatest Jewish historian of the twentieth century. He laid the ground work for how Jews perceive themselves and are perceived by others. The present series publishes new perspectives in the research on the Jewish experience of both distinguished and aspiring scholars who continue Salo Baron’s work. Contributions to the series focus on the relationship of Jews and non-Jews and perceptions and understandings of Judaism, including but not limited to the history, culture, religion, and institutions of the Jewish people, as well as on their persecution.