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Editors-in-Chief: Constance Moffatt and Sara Taglialagamba
Leonardo Studies establishes a forward-thinking approach to a traditional topic. The series seeks to engage with theoretical issues using a variety of methodological approaches. It also includes innovative viewpoints on the more typical problems of translation, influences, critical editions, and cultural transmission. The aim of the series is to offer diverse contributions on Leonardo da Vinci in subjects such as engineering, architecture, anatomy, and astronomy, but also painting, drawing, and sculpture, focusing on only the most recent discoveries by scholars.

Given the expansive nature of Leonardo’s undertakings, volumes draw from collaborations by scholars in the disciplines of literature, history, art history, biology, geology, intellectual history, history of the book, architecture, and others fields. We support the methodologies employed by these diverse fields and encourage scholars participating in the seminars to actively explore new ways of looking at Leonardo.

A peer-reviewed forum for interdisciplinary studies in history of human and nature relations, using primarily historical methodologies, covering changes in the biological and physical environments, views of nature and what they say about a society, and political environmental history. The scope includes historical and archaeological studies and the history of ideas and medicine. The chronology is wide: a world perspective is taken.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson or to the series editor Dr. Aleks Pluskowski (University of Reading, U.K.). For information on how to submit a book proposal, please consult the Brill Author Guide.
Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy and Science is a book series to be dedicated totally to the investigation of scientific thought between 1200 and 1700, the period that saw the birth of modern scientific method and the origins of the scientific world view. It covers not only the Aristotelian paradigm of scholastic natural philosophy, but also rivalling Renaissance and seventeenth-century conceptions of physics.
A broad-based and distinguished panel of editors and international advisors has made a careful selection of the best new research emerging in a vibrant field examining this formative period of European scientific thought. Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy and Science contains contributions from an international cast of experienced and promising scholars and looks for the highest standards of scholarship in work that is thought-provoking, insightful, and at the forefront of contemporary discussion.
Its editorial stance is broad, aiming not only to embrace all the main aspects of study but to approach them from a variety of angles and to foster new methodological ideas. Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy and Science thus includes commented editions of crucial (medieval) texts, monographs of important thinkers, and diachronic analyses of particular themes. Accessible, attractively written articles and monographs will open up the latest trends and developments in the field to a wide range of teachers and students in further and higher education.

Sponsored by the prestigious Center for Medieval and Renaissance Natural Philosophy at the Radboud University (Nijmegen) Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy and Science is essential reading for anyone studying intellectual history, the history of science, and the history of philosophy.

Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy and Science is a continuation of Medieval and Early Modern Science (MEMS).

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson or to one of the series editors: C.H. Lüthy, Radboud University, Nijmegen, or P.J.J.M. Bakker, Radboud University, Nijmegen.
For information on how to submit a book proposal, please consult the Brill Author Guide.