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Edited by William M. Reynolds and Brad Porfilio

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Arts, Creativities and Learning Environments in Global Perspectives aims at investigating the encounters that can occur between the arts and creativities in various learning environments and cultural contexts. The series intends to explore the multiplicity of these approaches by presenting perspectives from diverse learning environments, not solely formal institutions like schools, universities, academies, and colleges, but also non-formal ones (cultural institutions, libraries, museums, theatres, orchestras, archives, organisations, and work-places) or informal ones (play and games, community projects, amateur art, and clubs). This means that a pluralistic view on the artS – indeed, plural – is being embraced by including artistic expressions from all genres and artistic encounters at all levels, including the arts-based, artist-led, arts-inspired, arts-integrated. We encourage contributions from all over the world, in order to challenge a well-established Western-centred understanding of creativity and art (singular). This series will strongly support global perspectives, cross-cultural studies, critical theories, creative dissemination and a broader re-framing of the role of the arts for learning and for society.
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Brill's Educational Research E-Books Online, is the electronic version of the book publishing program of Brill in the field of Educational Research.
Coverage: General Education, Learning, Art Education, Language Education, Mathematics Education, Science Education, Youth Education, Higher Education, Adult Education, Educational Technology, Educational Theory, Educational Philosophy, Research Methodology, Comparative Education, Teacher Education, Professional Development, Education Policy & Politics, Educational Leadership, Culture and Education, Gender and Education, Inclusive Education.
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Revolutionizing Urban Education

Hip Hop, Pedagogy, and Communities

This series consists of books written for all stakeholders in education including undergraduate and graduate students of education, teachers, parents, and the community at large. The volumes bridge research, theory, personal anecdotes and practice, and interrogates and provides recommendations for schools and communities, specifically in urban spaces. Books in this series focus on utilizing hip-hop as education to transform urban education and schools, and to introduce critical pedagogical ways to engage communities, and schools. Educators, students, community members, and academics are given opportunities to understand the essential nature of voice and activism. This work is necessary to transform schools and communities to better represent the young people they were built to serve.
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The series critically investigates and informs the construction of youth identity and identity in general through the study of various forms of contemporary media. It will expand the notions of critical media literacy and its implications for multiple understandings of culture and youth. Since popular culture (including media texts) is one of the primary sites of education for our youth, and all of us, it is crucial for those scholars involved in critical media studies to discuss these issues in book form. The scope of books in this series will include scholarly investigations into the connections among the symbolic order, various forms of cultural artifacts and multiple critical readings of these artifacts within the context of critical/transformational media literacy. How do multiple interpretations of popular culture within conceptualizations of media enhance our understandings of education and how can critical pedagogy, in the Freirian sense, be expanded to develop a student’s critical consciousness of the texts (books, films, games, social media, etc.) that surround them in popular culture.
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This book series focuses on the historical foundations and current transformations of African higher education. It is aimed at scholars, students, academic leaders, policy makers and key stakeholders both in Africa and around the world, who have a strong interest in the progress, challenges and opportunities facing African higher education.
A diversity of higher education themes and issues related to African higher education at institutional, national, regional and international levels are addressed. These include, but are not limited to, new developments and perspectives related to knowledge production and dissemination; the teaching/learning process; all forms of academic mobility – student, scholar, staff, program, provider and policy; funding mechanisms; pan-Africa regionalization; alternate models of higher education provision; university leadership, governance and management; gender issues; use of new technologies; equitable access; student success; Africanization of the curriculum- to name only a few critical issues.
A diversity of approaches to scholarship is welcomed including theoretical, conceptual, applied, policy orientations. The notions of internationalization and harmonization of African higher education complements the cosmopolitan outlook of the series project through its comparative approach as critical imperatives. Finally, the book series is intended to attract both authors and readers, internal and external to Africa, all of whom are focused on African higher education including those doing comparative work on Africa with other regions of the world and the global South in particular.
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Partnerships and collaboration are two ideas that have transformed teacher education and enhanced teacher professional learning, enquiry and research. Increasingly, the changing context in which teachers work requires them to continually update and enhance their knowledge and skills, and to engage in different forms of professional development in order to understand the needs of their pupils and the communities they come from. This underlines the need for stronger partnerships to connect teachers with each other, with teacher education providers, with local communities, with local government, and with business and National Government Organizations (NGOs). Educational partnerships as a concept recognises the new ecology of digital interconnectivity, the need for stronger collaboration at all levels, and a new collective responsibility for education. Partnerships in the form of transnational education, public-private collaborations, interactions between formal and informal educational organisations, collaborations between tertiary organisations and industry/the service sector and amongst schools and between schools and their communities have emerged as strong policy and practice drivers. This series aims to span this broad understanding of partnership and make a contribution to both theory and practice.
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This series of research-based monographs and edited volumes provides comparative and international perspectives on key current issues in curriculum, learning and assessment. The principal features of the series are the innovative and critical insights it offers into the equitable provision of quality and relevant education for all; and the cross-disciplinary perspectives it engages, drawing on a range of domains that include peace, ethics, sociology, economics, politics, culture, gender, sustainability, inclusion, development and education. IBE on Curriculum, Learning, and Assessment aims to influence a wide range of actors in the field of education and development, whether academics, policy-makers, curriculum-developers, assessors, teachers or students. The series thus comprises innovative empirical research, case studies of policy and practice, conceptual analyses and policy evaluations, as well as critical analyses of published research and existing policy. With this series, IBE UNESCO builds on a long tradition of publishing research on relevant education topics, within an international perspective. Its predecessor, Studies in Comparative Education, initiated by the IBE in 1971, was among the most well-established series in the field.
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On (De)Coloniality: Curriculum Within and Beyond the West is a beacon in the struggle against epistemicide and the colonialities of being, power, and knowledge. It attempts to bring to the fore an analysis that focuses on non-Western/non-Eurocentric epistemological frameworks. In a world that still struggles to see its own overt epistemological diversity, On (De)Coloniality is an open space in which to challenge epistemological fascism. It encourages curriculum scholars to engage in dialogues about non-Western/non-Eurocentric epistemologies within and beyond the Western Eurocentric platform. We invite ‘complicated conversations’ that dig into new avenues such as those of Itinerant Curriculum Theory (ICT), and, in so doing, introduce a new language that will take us to alternative levels of articulation and re-articulation of meanings, through endless and spaceless processes of coding, decoding, recoding, and ‘encoding.’
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In the arts, the concept of theoria goes back to the original notion of thinking as a form of reflection/contemplation that remains integral to practice as both a practiced thought ( phronesis) and as critical practice ( praxis). This book series is aimed at capturing and reasserting the wider possibilities that we give ourselves by doing the arts. It explores how the arts and education can only converge through paradox, where what we seek by doing arts thinking remains an open work and in continuous inauguration.
Thus Doing Arts Thinking is an alternative view of arts education. Rooted in arts practice and arts research, it purposely retains a degree of ambiguity. It is not limited to “thinking about the arts”, or engaging with art theory as a separate entity from practice. Rather, this book series intends to show that to mistake arts thinking for abstract theory would be as false as dismissing arts practice for mere making; which would result in a narrow view of both arts practice and arts research, especially when a third element – that of arts education – is involved.