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Edited by Donald R. Rothwell, Imogen Saunders and Esmé Shirlow

Launched in 1965, The Australian Year Book of International Law (AYBIL) is Australia’s longest standing and most prestigious dedicated international law publication.
The Year Book aims to uniquely combine scholarly commentary with contributions from Australian government officials. Each volume contains a mix of scholarly articles, invited lectures, book reviews, notes of decisions by Australian and international courts, recent legislation, and collected Australian international law state practice.
It is a valuable resource for those working in the field of international law, including government officials, international organisation officials, non-government and community organisations, legal practitioners, academics and other researchers, as well as students studying international law, international relations, human rights and international affairs.
It focuses on Australian practice in international law and general international law, across a broad range of sub-fields including human rights, environmental law and legal theory, which are of interest to international lawyers worldwide.

Edited by Peter Quayle and Xuan Gao

The AIIB Yearbook of International Law (AYIL) is an annual legal publication in furtherance of the purpose of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, namely to foster sustainable economic development, create wealth and improve infrastructure connectivity in Asia by investing in infrastructure and other productive sectors, together with promoting regional cooperation and partnership in addressing development challenges. In doing this, the AIIB’s Office of the General Counsel, responsible for the Yearbook, looks outwards and embraces the larger responsibilities that befall a modern organization owned primarily by states, substantially supported by public funds and with the potential to impact on the lives of many. Those responsibilities include the obligation to share what we learn, the successes we celebrate and the failures we suffer, so that others may benefit from that experience.
Because it is not only experience that informs knowledge, the AIIB will also wish to offer, for the critical consideration of others, new ways of thinking about difficult issues with which international organizations and the wider legal community must contend. Some of those issues will be recurrent, sometimes being seemingly intractable. Assuredly, as yet unknown challenges also lie ahead, about what role law does, can and ought to play in empowering and constraining international organizations and others in the pursuit of societal objectives.
The search for answers, in the international legal sphere as elsewhere, will always draw us forwards together. Through this Yearbook, the AIIB strives to make some modest contribution to legal knowledge and understanding, not only by drawing on its own experiences and insights, but by offering a platform for others to develop and rigorously test ideas on matters of common interest and for the AIIB to disseminate them. In this endeavor, we all stand to gain with the enlargement of public goods.
Scope and Aims
Launched in 2018, the European Criminal Justice Series provides a forum for high-quality scholarship on the European dimensions of crime, criminal law, criminal policy, and punishment. Publications in the series provide insight into how crime, criminal law and criminal justice is developing within the European Union and on the European continent, both from a legal and criminological perspectives. The series particularly welcomes monographs but is also open to edited volumes.

Information for Authors
Authors who are interested to publish in the European Criminal Justice Series, are invited to submit a proposal for consideration by the editorial board. For questions regarding the European Criminal Justice Series, or to submit a proposal, please contact the Editorial Board. The Editorial Board consists of the board members of the European Journal of Crime, Criminal Law and Criminal Justice, and two additional members. Each manuscript will be reviewed by the two editors-in-chief and by either one or two board members – depending on the topic and the required expertise.
Studies in Polar Law publishes monographs and collected works devoted to the legal regimes applicable to the Arctic and the Antarctic. It explores the problems faced by these regions and the solutions proposed on issues such as the environment, sovereignty, dispute resolution, climate change, the rights of indigenous peoples, other human rights, good governance, wildlife, natural resources governance, law of the sea, land and resource claims in the Polar regions, self-determination and self-government, economic development, Arctic security, and the Arctic Council, the Antarctic treaty system and other relevant intergovernmental co-operation.
The New Zealand Yearbook of International Law, launched in 2004, is an annual, internationally refereed publication intended to stand as a reference point for legal materials and commentary on public international law generally and with particular emphasis on issues concerning New Zealand, Antarctica and the Southern Ocean, including critical writing in those areas. It boasts an exceptional Advisory Board consisting of leading national and international academics and practitioners who are called upon to provide input through the double blind refereeing process used to assure the quality of the submissions published in each volume. The Yearbook also serves as a valuable tool in the determination of trends, state practice and policies in the development of international law in New Zealand, the Southern Ocean and Antarctica and seeks to generate scholarship in those fields. In this regard the Yearbook contains an annual ‘Year-in-Review’ of developments in international law of particular interest to New Zealand. Equally so, New Zealand offers a unique environment, owing to its size, population and strategic proximity to the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, and the South Pacific, that makes the New Zealand Yearbook of general interest to the international community. It is for the latter reason that the Yearbook contains a section dedicated to the ‘The South Pacific’.
The Editors of the Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law invite submissions for Volume III. More information and instructions can be found here.

The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law aims to publish peer-reviewed scholarly articles and reviews as well as significant developments in human rights and humanitarian law. It examines international human rights and humanitarian law with a global reach, though its particular focus is on the Asian region.

The Asian Yearbook of Human Rights and Humanitarian Law is also available online.

Announcement and Call for Papers for the International Conference: Law, Gender and Sexuality, to be held in London on 26th October 2018. More information and instructions can be found here.
From the earliest days of the republic, American international legal scholars have produced a rich and comparably varied corpus of scholarship. Much of it has provoked significant innovations in international politics and all of it provides insights into American conceptions of international law and, for better or worse, the distinctive role many of the scholars believed the United States plays – or should play – in the international legal system. The American Classics in International Law series is intended to explore that literature.

The series will present a number of thematic volumes of classic American articles on international law which are reproduced and discussed by eminent scholars in their respective fields.

Edited by Loukas Mitselis and Nikos Lavranos

With the entrance of the European Union into the field of International Investment Law and Arbitration, a new specialist field of law, namely ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’ is in the making. This new field of law draws on EU Law, Public International Law, International Investment Law, International Arbitration Law and Practice and International Economic Law, while others fields of law such as Energy Law are also relevant.
The European Investment Law and Arbitration Review is the first law periodical specifically dedicated to the field of ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’. The timing could not be better. The first EU integrated investment treaties with Canada (CETA), US (TTIP) and Singapore (EU-SING) are either negotiated or about to be signed and ratified by the EU and its Member States. These are “integrated” investment treaties in that they combine free trade agreement provisions with international investment agreement norms. Moreover, the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) is about to deliver its first judgments and Opinions directly relating to intra-EU BITs and the EU-SING FTA. More generally, the public debate and discussions within academic and practitioner circles about the pros and cons of investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) and investment treaties in general is intensifying almost on a daily basis.
The Review will cover all these issues, but also goes beyond that by offering space for more innovative approaches and themes.

Published under the auspices of Queen Mary University of London and EFILA.

The European Investment Law and Arbitration Review is also available online.

Edited by Seokwoo Lee and Zou Keyuan

This series serves as a platform to promote East Asian maritime studies. The region’s dynamic economic development and complex history has sparked a lively debate amongst academics and policymakers struggling to maintain lasting peace and security in Pacific waters. While narrowing in on the impacts of international law in East Asian seas, the series also promotes a multi-disciplinary lens of the issue across several social sciences including international relations, economics, politics, strategic studies and law of the sea. The series aims to publish innovative works from leading scholars in the field.

Edited by Thomas Cottier

The series contributes to research in the field of international economic law, comprising international trade regulation, investment and monetary affairs. It offers a venue for monographs and collective works making substantial contributions to the field in the wider context of public international law and related areas of domestic and regional law. The series is dedicated to foster transdisciplinary research. While focusing on law, it seeks to take into account developments in economics and international relations theory as well as history and political philosophy relevant to the field.