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Ever since the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, the influence of Plutarch, the great writer of Chaeronea, has been enormous. From Montaigne and Shakespeare to S. Zweig and J.K. Rowling, Plutarch has helped to shape modern Western thought and culture. Besides being an influential figure for intellectual and literary trends, Plutarch has also been fundamental in the transmission of ancient lore to medieval, Renaissance and modern Europe. Indeed, Plutarch is still a key figure for our understanding of the first centuries of the Common Era: his social provenance, education, rich political career and social life make him a first-rate witness to the cultural life of late antiquity.

The past two decades have witnessed an upsurge in scholarship on Plutarch. Classicists, archaeologists, historians, philosophers and theologians alike have shown a renewed interest in this intriguing figure and his works, particularly for the light they might shed on ancient culture. In point of fact, both his Lives and his Moralia are inexhaustible sources of information about numerous aspects of the ancient world and its wisdom, helping scholars as they attempt to reconstruct the past. This is as true for religion, philosophy, literature, politics, and science (botanic, zoology, astronomy, or mathematics), as it is for pseudo-sciences such as divination, astrology, or numerology.

Brill’s Plutarch Studies is a response to this renewed scholarly interest in the encyclopedic writer of Chaeronea. In addition to monographs and edited volumes, the series includes updated [English] translations of and commentaries on both Lives and Moralia. As such, it intends both to bring together the most significant Plutarch scholarship of recent years, as well as to provide a forum in which new approaches might be discussed.
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Mnemosyne Supplements (MNS) has existed as a book series for about 80 years, providing a forum for the publication of over 400 scholarly works on all aspects of the Ancient World, including inscriptions, papyri, language, the history of material culture and mentality, the history of peoples and institutions, but also latterly the classical tradition, for example, neo-Latin literature and the history of Classical scholarship.

Mnemosyne Supplements Online includes all volumes until 2017, divided over two collections: the first collection contains all volumes from the beginning in 1938 until 1999 (volumes 1 - 203), and the second collection consists of all the volumes from 2000 up until 2017 (volumes 204-407). The collections include volumes published in MNS subseries History and Archaeology of Classical Antiquity (HACA) and (LAL) as well.
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Various Authors & Editors

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This series combines persisting needs with emerging emphases in Armenian studies. It encourages studies that place Armenian culture in its multifaceted international context, on the Armenian plateau as well as in its historic and current Diaspora.
Philological studies containing important critically edited texts, translations and commentaries remain in need as before. Thousands of Armenian manuscripts await disclosure in order to become part of scholarly and popular discourse and take their place in a field that invites an interdisciplinary and pluralistic approach like few others.
Armenian literature from the seventeenth century up to the present is understudied and will amply repay scholarly engagement.
In recent decades, the study of Armenian material culture, mythology and folklore has made great strides, next to art and architecture.The series welcomes contributions in these extensive fields.
Armenian Texts and Studies deals with Armenian prehistory up to the modern and contemporary period and promotes research that applies methods current in sociology, anthropology and other social sciences next to those used in literary, linguistic and historical studies, including the study of Armenian cinema and modern media.
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Konstellationen

Die Philosophie und die Künste

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Edited by Friedrich Balke and Bernhard Siegert

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Studies on East Asian Religions seeks to break through the barriers between academic disciplines, sectarian divisions and geographical borders, in the scholarship on the religions of East Asia by bringing together scholars and sources that have not often been in dialogue before. Its field of research is the vast array of newly-available primary sources for the doctrines and practices of East Asian Religions.
By promoting research that assembles material from across East Asia (the area in which, historically, written Chinese was a major language of religion and culture), this book series will make possible a broader view of regional interactions that does not privilege one locale or one vector of exchange. To do so, it will be essential to publish work in English by scholars from and of all parts of East Asia alongside that of researchers working in Europe and North America.
The series will accept regular monographs, edited volumes, translations and occasionally collected volumes, all subject to peer review.
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In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.

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Schlachten zu Lande, zu Wasser und in der Luft zählen zu den ungebrochen faszinierenden Themen für Geschichtsinteressierte. In der Reihe »Schlachten - Stationen der Weltgeschichte« werden bewusst nicht nur die militärischen und technischen Aspekte kriegerischer Auseinandersetzungen und ihre politischen Voraussetzungen behandelt. Vielmehr geht es darum, die Besonderheiten der Kriegsführung mit Blick auf die jeweiligen gesellschaftlichen Verhältnisse zu erläutern, so dass gleichzeitig ein anschauliches Bild von den besonderen Formen der Kriegs- und Konfliktführung und von den besonderen sozialen und kulturellen Rahmenbedingungen in Antike, Mittelalter, Früher Neuzeit und Neuester Zeit erkennbar wird. Auch der Erinnerungskultur und den Mythen um die jeweiligen Ereignisse wird gebührend Aufmerksamkeit gewidmet.

Alle Bände der Reihe sind identisch aufgebaut. Abbildungen, Karten und Literaturhinweise bereichern die Darstellung.
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Gendering the Trans-Pacific World

Diaspora, Empire, and Race

Series Editors: Catherine Ceniza Choy and Judy Tzu-Chun Wu

This innovative book series explores the gendered nature of the Pacific World by focusing on three phenomena: Diaspora, Empire, and Race. It features how people have dispersed across the Pacific for trade, labor, migration, cultural exchange, and military engagement. These migrations rarely occur in gendered balanced ways, resulting in “bachelor” societies in the receiving country and “stranded” women in the sending country. At other times, female migrants have been in the forefront of migration. The Pacific has also been the site of multiple empires – Asian, European, and American. These colonial powers were invested in managing the gender and sexual relations among and between “natives” and “colonizers.” Finally, the phenomenon of migration and political expansion coincided with racializing processes that established social hierarchies based on naturalized assumptions of biological difference. Here again, gender was essential to these efforts. Gendering the Trans-Pacific World seeks scholarship that offers original approaches to understanding these complex power relations. It welcomes social and cultural history and biography as well as interdisciplinary works that examine art, photography, film, and literature.

Manuscripts should be at least 90,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.