Edited by Loukas Mitselis and Nikos Lavranos

With the entrance of the European Union into the field of International Investment Law and Arbitration, a new specialist field of law, namely ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’ is in the making. This new field of law draws on EU Law, Public International Law, International Investment Law, International Arbitration Law and Practice and International Economic Law, while others fields of law such as Energy Law are also relevant.
The European Investment Law and Arbitration Review is the first law periodical specifically dedicated to the field of ‘European Investment Law and Arbitration’. The timing could not be better. The first EU integrated investment treaties with Canada (CETA), US (TTIP) and Singapore (EU-SING) are either negotiated or about to be signed and ratified by the EU and its Member States. These are “integrated” investment treaties in that they combine free trade agreement provisions with international investment agreement norms. Moreover, the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) is about to deliver its first judgments and Opinions directly relating to intra-EU BITs and the EU-SING FTA. More generally, the public debate and discussions within academic and practitioner circles about the pros and cons of investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) and investment treaties in general is intensifying almost on a daily basis.
The Review will cover all these issues, but also goes beyond that by offering space for more innovative approaches and themes.

Published under the auspices of Queen Mary University of London and EFILA.

The European Investment Law and Arbitration Review is also available online.
The Historiography of Rome and Its Empire series aims to gather innovative and outstanding contributions in order to identify debates and trends, and in order to help provide a better understanding of ancient historiography, as well as how to approach Roman history and historiography. We would particularly welcome proposals that look at both Roman and Greek writers, but are also happy to look at ones which focus on individual writers, or individuals in the same tradition. It is timely and valuable to bring these trends and historical sources together by founding the Series, focusing mainly on the Republican period and the principate, as well as the Later Roman Empire.

Book proposals can be sent either to the series editors Carsten Hjort Lange and Jesper Majbom Madsen or directly to Brill.
The Classical Shiʿah Library is devoted to translations of key texts (prophetic and imamic sayings, classical Shiʿah literature, works of jurisprudence, theology, mysticism and philosophy) in dual text format (Arabic with facing English translation) annotated and supported with a full academic apparatus.

Edited by Russell Fuller, Matthias Henze, Armin Lange and Emanuel Tov

Supplements to the Textual History of the Bible focuses on the textual criticism and textual history of the Hebrew Bible and cognate literatures in their manifold languages and traditions. The series and its topics are of interest to Jewish and Christian scholars and libraries engaged with religious and biblical studies at both private and public institutions.

The series will consist of individual monographs as well as collected volumes. Examples could include studies analyzing individual textual witnesses in their social context and in the reading they provide to a given biblical book but also studies dedicated to broader implications of textual history and the sociology of the text as well as the history of the scholarship.

The series is peer reviewed and will, initially, solicit proposals from contributors to the reference work Textual History of the Bible . However, the series is also open to proposals from any qualified scholars of the text of the Bible. Volumes will be published in the major scholarly languages in the field.
Brill’s Companions to the Musical Culture of Medieval and Early Modern Europe is a peer reviewed series of research companion volumes providing high-level and up-to-date surveys of current research into all aspects of medieval and early modern musical culture in Europe, including composers, schools, genres, instruments, education, dance, musical manuscripts and early musical printing, and the musical cultures of given cities, chapels, religious orders and courts. Written by the foremost specialists in the respective fields, they offer balanced accounts along with an overview of the state of scholarship and a synthesis of debate, pointing the way for future research. The books are normally multi-author volumes, thoroughly planned out at an editorial level to ensure comprehensiveness and cohesion, maximising their value to the student and scholar.

For Brill's Open Access options click here

Edited by Paul V.M. Flesher

Supplements to Aramaic Studies (STAS) succeeds the series Studies in the Aramaic Interpretation of Scripture (SAIS), the first volume of which was published in 2002. The new series serves as a companion to the journal Aramaic Studies, and like it aims to provide a publishing venue for scholarly studies in all areas related to Aramaic; it is no longer limited to the Targums and other translations of biblical books into Aramaic.
The series now solicits book-length analyses of any literary type or genre composed in Aramaic. These include but are not limited to inscriptions, letters, translations, wisdom literature, legal works and poetry. Studies of spoken Aramaic are also welcome. It seeks works studying any dialect, from Old Aramaic and Imperial Aramaic to Neo-Aramaic, from the Palmyrene and Nabatean dialects through biblical and Qumran Aramaic to the Jewish and Christian dialects of the Late Roman and Byzantine periods, from the Aramaic works found in Egypt to the Babylonian and Mandaic writings of Mesopotamia. Any scholarly approach is welcome: historical, philological, linguistic, exegetical, literary, or theological. Critical editions of primary sources are welcome as well.

Edited by Wolfram Brandes

Brill’s Companions to the Byzantine World is a peer reviewed series of research companion volumes providing high-level and up-to-date surveys of current research into all aspects of the Byzantine world from the 4th to the 15th centuries. Volumes deal with cities, regions, monasteries, courts, persons, movements, schools, classical and biblical reception, genres, and more. Written by the foremost specialists in the respective fields, they offer balanced accounts along with an overview of the state of scholarship and a synthesis of debate, pointing the way for future research. The books are normally multi-author volumes, thoroughly planned out at an editorial level to ensure comprehensiveness and cohesion, maximising their value to the student and scholar.

Forthcoming in the series:

Wolfram Hörandner, Andreas Rhoby and Nikos Zagklas, eds., A Companion to Byzantine Poetry

Salvatore Cosentino, ed., A Companion to Byzantine Italy

Mihailo Popović, ed., A Companion to Byzantium and Medieval Serbia

Christian Gastgeber, Ekaterini Mitsiou, Johannes Preiser-Kapeller and Vratislav Zervan, eds., A Companion to the Patriarchate of Constantinople

How have the historical experiences and legacies of the communist revolution before 1949 and socialism under Mao influenced the course of reform and development in China since the 1980s? And how do Chinese intellectuals reexamine the aspects and trajectories of socialism and reform in China and reinterpret the links and discontinuities between them? The Rethinking Socialism and Reform in China series presents the most innovative studies in English translation by leading Chinese scholars, which have been originally published by Open Times ( Kaifang shidai), one of the most influential journals in China that appeals to both academics and the general public. The planned volumes of the series cover a variety of themes ranging from the communist revolution, social control and mobilization, and everyday power relations in Maoist China, to economic change, governance and resistance, gender, ethnicity, and cultural issues in recent decades.
This book series takes an interdisciplinary approach, examining the literature of modernity through consideration of its diverse phenomena and contexts.
While the Early Modern Era was marked in cultural-historical terms by the Renaissance, economically by the Industrial Revolution and politically by the French Revolution as well as nationalism, a first high point in modern literature was achieved by insights drawn from the natural and human sciences, foremost the fields of psychoanalysis, the quantum hypothesis, and the theory of relativity. A necessary condition for the interdisciplinary approach, therefore, in addition to the consideration of socio-cultural implications, is engagement with the history of thought, which makes the development of the Modern Era comprehensible.
This premise provides the basis for the examination of the numerous phenomena of modernity through the lens of literary texts, stemming from all applicable national literatures.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.