Brill's Companions to the Americas

History, Societies, Environments and Cultures

A peer-reviewed series of “state-of-the-field” handbooks to provide up-to-date surveys of themes, places, persons, movements, events, and more in the history of the Americas from the earliest times to the present and of the societal, environmental, and cultural forces that shaped them. Written by teams of foremost specialists in their respective fields, these companions aim to offer new approaches to area studies and to open up critical questions to discussion, but also to provide full and balanced accounts and syntheses of debate and the state of scholarship in the field. Each volume is constructed in a similar manner: a small number of introductory chapters to present the current narratives and update recent historiography followed by a larger number of thematic chapters.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.

Series Editors: Damian Alan Pargas and Jeff Fynn-Paul

As a practice in which human beings were held captive for an indefinite period of time, coerced into extremely dependent and exploitative power relationships, denied rights (including rights over their labor, lives, and bodies), often vulnerable to forced relocation by various means, and forced to labor against their will, slavery in one form or another predates written records and has existed in innumerable societies. This exciting series provides a venue for scholarly work—research monographs and edited volumes—that advances our understanding of the history of slavery and post-slavery in any period and any geographical region. It fills an important gap in academic publishing and builds upon two relatively recent developments in historical scholarship. First, it provides a world-class outlet for the increased scholarly interest shown in slavery studies in recent years, not only for those working on modern Atlantic societies but also other regions and time periods throughout world history. Second, this series intersects slavery studies with a growing interest in global history among researchers, including global migrations and interactions, warfare, trade routes, and economic expansion. Studies in Global Slavery welcomes submissions that deal with themes such as the development of slave societies and societies with slaves; human trafficking and forced migration; slavery and globalization; slave culture and cultural transfer; political, economic, and ideological causes and effects of slavery; resistance; abolition and emancipation; and memories/legacies of slavery.

Monographs by specialists in the field are especially sought, but multi-authored edited volumes containing academic articles by slavery scholars will also be considered. Manuscripts should be written in English and be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations, tables, maps, and other visual material.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.

Edited by David Beck, Mily Crevels, Hein van der Voort and Roberto Zavala

This peer-reviewed book series offers an international forum for high-quality scholarly studies on the indigenous languages of South, Central and North America, including the Arctic. Around 1,000 genealogically and typologically very diverse languages are spoken in this immense region. Due to ecological and cultural pressure this treasure trove of languages is often highly endangered with extinction, hence the urgency of its preservation and study. The publications in this series will concern both descriptive and analytical work on American indigenous languages, and include handbooks, language surveys, grammatical descriptions and theoretical, historical, areal and typological monographs or particularly well-organized edited volumes with a central theme. Even though the scope of the series is international, authors are encouraged to write in English to reach as large as possible a readership.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Jesús Benito Sánchez and Ana María Manzanas

The series locates itself within the field of comparative American studies, and focuses specifically on the analysis and criticism of the so-called “ethnic” American literatures. The orientation of the series is, explicitly, for the literary analysis to merge the political with the imaginative, and the culturally-specific with the cross-cultural. As an intercultural endeavor, the series assumes the inextricable link between standards of aesthetic value and power; aesthetic judgments are not made in an vacuum but are rather intimately connected with dominant cultural standards of value. In this sense, intercultural literary analysis should address issues of race, ethnicity, class and gender, while it focuses on literary topics, therefore occupying the interspace between the political and the aesthetic.

By ethnic American literature is understood the multiethnic literatures of the United States, with an emphasis on the comparative analysis of the different traditions (including African American literature, Asian American literature, Native American lit., Chicano and US latino literature, as well as other so called hyphenated or immigrant writers with non-US background like Indian writers, Arab American writers, European American writers, etc.). The series focus is mostly comparative, multiethnic, and intercultural, but would also love to feature analyses of single ethnic traditions.

The volumes in the series offer clear and comprehensive approaches to selected topics (such as magical realism, border theory, and others), covering the different implications of each topic to the development of ethnic American literatures. Volumes then proceed to comparative literary analyses of carefully selected works from each ethnic tradition.

Volumes should offer interrelated contributions. Each volume should consist of long articles, carefully designed to cover the whole field under study. Each article should offer a general, theoretical exploration of a particular topic, as well as argue a particular point.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

The Atlantic World

Europe, Africa and the Americas, 1500-1830

Series Editors: Wim Klooster and Benjamin Schmidt

The explosion of boundaries that took place in the early modern period—cultural and intellectual, no less than social and political—is the subject of this exciting series that explores the meeting of peoples, products, ideas, and traditions in the early modern Americas, Africa, and Europe. The Atlantic World provides a forum for scholarly work—original monographs, article collections, editions of primary sources translations—on these exciting global mixtures and their impact on culture, politics and society in the period bridging the original Columbian "encounter" and the abolition of slavery. It moves away from traditional historiographical emphases that isolate continents and nation-states and toward a broader terrain that includes non-European perspectives. It also encourages a wider disciplinary approach to early modern studies. Themes will include the commerce of ideas and products; the exchange of religions and traditions; the institution of slavery; the transfer of technologies; the development of new forms of political, social and economic policy. It welcomes studies that employ diverse forms of analysis and from all scholarly disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology, art history, history (including the history of science), linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, and religious studies.

Manuscripts (preferably in English) should be 90,000 to 180,000 words in length and may include illustrations. The editors would be interested to receive proposals for specialist monographs and syntheses but may also consider multi-authored contributions such as conference proceedings and edited volumes, as well as thematic works and source translations.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.
Amsterdam Monographs in American Studies is a series devoted to the study of the history, culture and society of the United States. The Series specifically aims at publishing work in American Studies done by European scholars. It also seeks to bring a European dimension to American Studies, highlighting the United States either as an object of the European imagination or as a source of change in Europe, affecting it culturally, socially and politically.