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Early American History Series

The American Colonies, 1500-1830

Series editors: Jaap Jacobs, L.H. Roper, and Bertrand Van Ruymbeke

The early modern colonization of the Americas ranks among the most influential developments that shaped the modern world. Between the initial exploratory European contacts with the Americas in the late fifteenth century and the eventual independence of American states from Europe lies the multifaceted development of small communities into large colonies, which drew upon their European inheritance and their New World experience and interaction with non-European cultures and societies to form distinctive cultures and identities. The peer-reviewed book series Early American History Series is dedicated to the advancement of scholarly understanding of the history of the colonization of the Americas. It offers explorations on any aspect of early American history to a broad audience of historians. These investigations may be conceived in the broadest way chronologically, geographically, and thematically, whether in explicitly comparative studies, or by the grouping of studies. The book series is housed at the State University of New York—New Paltz (U.S.A.).

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.
Series Editors: Corinne Hofman and Maarten Jansen

The indigenous cultures of North, Middle and South America, including the Caribbean, have a diverse, long, and fascinating history, reaching from the early pre-colonial past until the present. Modern multidisciplinary research investigates many social, political, economic and religious aspects, such as the population movements, the original development of agriculture, sedentary communities, chiefdoms and early states, the effects of mobility and exchange, the forms, functions and meanings of writing systems and visual art, the indigenous knowledge, technology and organisation as well as cosmovision, rituals, biology and medicine, but also the process of European colonization, which caused major destruction as well as complex intercultural dynamics and synergies. Given the importance of cultural continuity in the present, this series pays further attention to living traditions and oral literature, as well as to the present-day issues of cultural values and indigenous rights.

The Early Americas: History and Culture series provides an international peer-reviewed forum for innovative contributions and synthetic standard works in the fields of archaeology, iconography and epigraphy, history, anthropology, museology, material culture and heritage studies. The editors welcome original monographs, edited volumes, article collections, editions, and translations of primary sources, preferably written in English. Submissions in Spanish, Portuguese, French or German will be considered on a case-by-case basis.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.

The Atlantic World

Europe, Africa and the Americas, 1500-1830

Series Editors: Wim Klooster and Benjamin Schmidt

The explosion of boundaries that took place in the early modern period—cultural and intellectual, no less than social and political—is the subject of this exciting series that explores the meeting of peoples, products, ideas, and traditions in the early modern Americas, Africa, and Europe. The Atlantic World provides a forum for scholarly work—original monographs, article collections, editions of primary sources translations—on these exciting global mixtures and their impact on culture, politics and society in the period bridging the original Columbian "encounter" and the abolition of slavery. It moves away from traditional historiographical emphases that isolate continents and nation-states and toward a broader terrain that includes non-European perspectives. It also encourages a wider disciplinary approach to early modern studies. Themes will include the commerce of ideas and products; the exchange of religions and traditions; the institution of slavery; the transfer of technologies; the development of new forms of political, social and economic policy. It welcomes studies that employ diverse forms of analysis and from all scholarly disciplines, including anthropology, archaeology, art history, history (including the history of science), linguistics, literature, music, philosophy, and religious studies.

Manuscripts (preferably in English) should be 90,000 to 180,000 words in length and may include illustrations. The editors would be interested to receive proposals for specialist monographs and syntheses but may also consider multi-authored contributions such as conference proceedings and edited volumes, as well as thematic works and source translations.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.