Brill’s Studies in Art & Materiality is a peer-reviewed book series dedicated to innovative scholarship about the relation between art, materials, and making.

Artists possess knowledge about materials, their affordances and interactions, and skillfully transform materials into art objects. The resulting specific materiality of a work of art is not only an index of its making, but is also fundamentally connected to meaning, aesthetic perception, mimetic potential, economic value, cultural and social impact, as well as its endurance and preservation. Understanding these connections enhances the field of art history and opens new avenues of investigation, ranging from the focused situated study of individual materials and art objects to comparative inquiries that cross traditional boundaries between genre, time, and space. The development of salient theoretical and methodological frameworks to study the materiality of art connects art history and its sub-disciplines (technical art history, museum studies) to anthropology, history of science, archaeology, material culture studies, as well as the cognitive sciences.

The series accommodates scholarly monographs, collections of essays, conference proceedings, and reference works that engage with the rich meanings of art works’ materiality.

The series is not restricted to a particular chronological period or geographical region, thereby allowing for a broad range of topics. In addition, the series has an interdisciplinary component, while keeping a distinct profile. As such, the series promises rich, innovative content for a wide academic readership.

Arts, Creativities, and Learning Environments in Global Perspectives aims at investigating the encounters that can occur between the arts and creativities in various learning environments and cultural contexts. The series intends to explore the multiplicity of these approaches by presenting perspectives from diverse learning environments, not solely formal institutions like schools, universities, academies, and colleges, but also non-formal ones (cultural institutions, libraries, museums, theatres, orchestras, archives, organisations, and work-places) or informal ones (play and games, community projects, amateur art, and clubs). This means that a pluralistic view on the artS – indeed, plural – is being embraced by including artistic expressions from all genres and artistic encounters at all levels, including the arts-based, artist-led, arts-inspired, arts-integrated. We encourage contributions from all over the world, in order to challenge a well-established Western-centred understanding of creativity and art (singular). This series will strongly support global perspectives, cross-cultural studies, critical theories, creative dissemination and a broader re-framing of the role of the arts for learning and for society.

Nuncius Series

Studies and Sources in the Material and Visual History of Science

Edited by Marco Beretta and Sven Dupré

Nuncius Series explores the material sources of scientific endeavor, such as scientific instruments and collections, the specific settings of experimental practice, and the interactions between sciences and arts. The materiality of science is a fundamental source for the understanding of its history, and the visual representation of its concepts and objects is equally crucial. Nuncius Series focuses on the exploration of increasingly-varied modes of visual description of observed reality.

The series also invites to explore the role of iconography and portraiture in the self-representation of the scientist. Interpretative studies and documentary surveys are both welcome.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Stefan Einarson or to one of the series editors: Marco Beretta (University of Bologna) or Sven Dupré (Utrecht University / University of Amsterdam). For information on how to submit a book proposal, please consult the Brill Author Guide.
Brill’s Studies in the History of Collecting & Art Markets is a peer-reviewed book series dedicated to original scholarship on the social, cultural, and economic mechanisms underlying the circulation of art. Over the last two decades interest in the formation, display, and dissolution of art collections increased tremendously; art markets, trade routes, and dealer networks became a rich field of interdisciplinary inquiry. Scholarship brought forth a lot of information about the flamboyant personalities to which the possession of art was a lifestyle; for the “social life of things”, i.e. the provenances of individual artworks, many research gaps could be closed. This shift in scholarly interest from the production side to the consumption side of the art world is also reflected in the emergence of specialized post-graduate courses offered by a number of institutions internationally, as well as an ever-increasing stream of exhibitions, conferences, and publications devoted to the subject. Brill’s book series accommodates scholarly monographs, collections of essays, conference proceedings, and works of reference that engage in the broadly defined topic of art markets and collecting practices throughout history.


This book series takes an interdisciplinary approach, examining the literature of modernity through consideration of its diverse phenomena and contexts.
While the Early Modern Era was marked in cultural-historical terms by the Renaissance, economically by the Industrial Revolution and politically by the French Revolution as well as nationalism, a first high point in modern literature was achieved by insights drawn from the natural and human sciences, foremost the fields of psychoanalysis, the quantum hypothesis, and the theory of relativity. A necessary condition for the interdisciplinary approach, therefore, in addition to the consideration of socio-cultural implications, is engagement with the history of thought, which makes the development of the Modern Era comprehensible.
This premise provides the basis for the examination of the numerous phenomena of modernity through the lens of literary texts, stemming from all applicable national literatures.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


Experimental Practices

Technoscience, Literature, Art, Philosophy

Edited by Sher Doruff and Manuela S. Rossini

The series seeks to develop the status of science, art, literature and philosophy as truly experimental practices, each of which regularly borrows from any and all of the others in order to further its drive to experimentation, invention and innovation. This implies an understanding of the arts as research: i.e. as a particular form of knowledge production and practice among many others.

It builds on the collaborative ethos of the US-based, international Society for Science, Literature, and the Arts (SLSA) and seeks to extend this more actively by extending transdisciplinary exchanges between scholars more firmly into collaborations between scholars and artists or scientists. The specific aims of the series are the following:
- In order to stimulate the emergence of new modes of discourse and a new aesthetics at the interface between disciplines, the series commissions truly collaborative works associating artists and scholars or scientists in innovative interplay.
- Transdisciplinary and in accordance with the aim of fostering collaborations between the arts and sciences, the series combines different epistemological and methodological approaches in order to contribute to the development of theoretical models and analytical tools for concrete and pressing social and scientific problems.
- Conscious of the potential of hypertext and electronic publishing for the furtherance of interactive transdisciplinary practices, the series intends to avail itself fully of the latest technology and media and to place itself at the forefront of developments in e-publishing.
- Striving to bring into sharp focus the possibilities for critical and creative interplay between science, art, literature and philosophy, the series encourages theoretical debates and political and historical studies of their mutually enriching – or at times disenabling – collaborations and conflicts.
- It is also committed to underlining the contribution of European thinkers to its field of study and promoting current European research – significantly, though not exclusively, represented at meetings of SLSAeu (the European branch of the SLSA).

The series consists of two strands:
1. Experimental Practices Monographs publishes both works by single authors and truly collaborative volumes. As well as books on larger historical, political and theoretical topics and experimental collaborations across disciplines, it encourages studies concentrating on a single author, artist or indeed work – always providing that such ‘case studies’ provide a direct contribution to methodological, theoretical, philosophical, etc., issues.
2. The Experimental Practices Yearbook publishes papers from the European Society for Science, Literature and the Arts. Each yearly publication has a strong individual identity, centered on a specific topic and is entrusted to a distinguished guest editor.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


This is a new series with an average of one volume per year.

Edited by Larissa Tracy

A peer-reviewed book series that provides a forum for investigations of aspects of the medieval world from a textual and cultural perspective, using an interdisciplinary approach. This series examines a varied range of social and cultural issues like language, identity, monstrosity, gender, race, religion, injustice, medical treatment, death, and grief through the whole medieval period, ca. 600–1500, including early modern and modern medievalisms and responses to the Middle Ages. Innovative and interesting cultural and intertextual studies from all geographical regions of the medieval world are welcome. The series will contain monographs, edited volumes, and critical editions and other works of reference.

This is a new series with an average of one volume per year.
This peer reviewed book series focuses on scholarly publications (monographs, edited volumes, catalogues) on visual arts in the Netherlands up to 1900.
The Oud Holland Book Series is closely related to the journal Oud Holland, Quarterly for Dutch Art History, the oldest surviving art historical journal in the world. The book series is a platform for larger studies on topics relevant for the journal. Books are published in English.

Manuscripts can be submitted for review to the publisher, attention of Liesbeth Hugenholtz (hugenholtz@brill.com).

Edited by Sarah Blick and Laura D. Gelfand

A peer-reviewed* book series that provides a forum for art-historical and interdisciplinary approaches to how art was conceived, produced, and received across a wide spectrum. It will pay particular attention to the cultural, religious, and political history of the period from 1200-1600 as seen through visual and material culture. It will contain monographs, collected essays on focused topics, text editions (with translation and commentary), and works of reference.
Print volumes are of 90,000-180,000 words (200-400 pages). Volumes will almost invariably contain a substantial number of high quality black-and-white and colour illustrations. Extra colour images, extra datasets, audio and video material, extra text and updatable guides with external links for readers can be included in an enhanced online version of the text.

*For Brill's peer review process see here.

For Brill's Open Access options click here

The series has published an average of two volumes per year since 2014.
Modern Asian Art and Visual Culture is an academic series devoted to the visual culture of Asia of the modern period, spanning roughly from the mid-1850s up to the present day. It includes monographs and edited volumes on art and architecture; art history; art worlds and markets; visual materials related to propaganda; religion and art and also extends to the performing arts, cinema and media studies. It also actively seeks interdisciplinary or theoretical approaches to religion, literature, and the social sciences as well as projects that address modern Asian art and visual culture from a comparative or interregional perspective.

The series has published an average of one volume per year since 2013.