Browse results

Edited by Thorsten Botz-Bornstein

Over the last several decades an increasing number of people have studied film with a general interest in philosophy. Philos-sophia, the love of wisdom, is an attempt at interpreting or questioning human existence and the world in its entirety. Naturally film can be one of its subjects. In this series, philosophical writers account for their experience of specific films, directors, certain themes, or the phenomenon of film in general. Philosophy of film exceeds the schedule of mere interpretation and puts film in relationship with classical philosophical questions such as (its own) essence, truth, or beauty. Those reflections can also take the form of film aesthetics and film theory, which are philosophical inasmuch as their approaches are methodologically sophisticated and they transgress empiricism. Benefiting from the intellectual wealth of the entire history of the humanities, this series is an ideal source for anyone interested in the philosophical dimensions of cinema.

Book Proposals
Minimum length is 80 000 words main text. Please send a book proposal (ca. 1000 words) and a CV to thorstenbotz@hotmail.com. We will then say whether the project can be taken further. Monographs, edited volumes as well as "companions to" are welcome. Complete manuscripts will be double-blind peer reviewed.
Your MS should not be simultaneously submitted to another press.

Edited by Michael Y. Bennett

New Perspectives in Edward Albee Studies is an annual peer-reviewed book series meant to provide an outlet for scholarship and criticism on, or related to, Edward Albee and his works. Volumes feature original, academic essays and review-essays centered around a special topic. Each volume is edited by a Guest Editor. The series welcomes and encourages different critical and theoretical scholarly approaches to Albee studies. In keeping with Albee’s own view that drama is literature, New Perspectives in Edward Albee Studies is also very interested in essays that examine Albee’s plays as dramatic literature.
The series offers a platform for studies in literature and the performing arts of the Muslim World at large, covering all periods (pre-modern to present day) and a wide variety of cultural traditions and languages (including, but not limited to, Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Urdu, and other Asian and African languages and practices). It draws scholars from various fields such as literature, theater, music and dance, folklore and epic, liturgy and rituals, cinema and media studies, and popular culture. It encourages and fosters comparative and interdisciplinary studies.

In addition to monographs, the series welcomes text editions and translations of significant primary texts, as well as thematic collections of articles.

The series has published an average of one title per year since 2014.

Edited by Jan Bloemendal

A peer-reviewed series on topics in early modern forms of theatre, theatricality and drama. Contributions may come from any of the disciplines within the humanities, such as theatre studies, musicology, literary history, art history, book history, church history, social history, cultural history, and history of ideas. The series aims to open up new areas of research or new approaches to early modern drama. It publishes monographs, collections of essays and key text editions.

The series publishes an average of one volume per year. The series' editor-in-chief is Jan Bloemendal.

Themes in Theatre

Collective Approaches to Theatre and Performance

The series Themes in Theatre is published in association with the International Federation for Theatre Research/Fédération Internationale pour la Recherche Théâtrale (FIRT/IFTR) and provides a publishing environment for collective work by its members. Monographs are not considered for this series; it aims at volumes that are characterised by a high level of interconnectedness – each author clearly contributing to a central subject within the field of theatre and performance. The fact that the multiple authors will have discussed the subject and their contributions among each other not only ensures a high level of consistency within each volume but also results in a gamut of approaches and perspectives that nevertheless are centrally focused.
As such the series reflects contemporary issues and current scholarship within international theatre studies. Its main contributors are the working groups of the FIRT/IFTR consisting of specialists working on diverse subjects at the forefront of theatre research. Therefore Themes in Theatre is not limited to any specific ‘-ism’, theatre genre, approach or methodology. As long as academic standards are met and the collectivity of the work is ensured we welcome historical, critical, theoretical, analytical or other subjects that are related to the theatrical arts. However, the set-up of the series is such that it explicitly furthers interdisciplinary work and reflection on concepts and methods.
For information on the FIRT/IFTR, its working groups and yearly conferences, please see the website:
www.firt-iftr.org.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.

Ludus

Medieval and Early Renaissance Theatre and Drama

Ludus intends to introduce those interested in literature, in the performing arts, or in history to the various aspects of theatre and drama from the Middle Ages and the Early Renaissance. It publishes books on closely defined topics, mostly seen from a comparative point of view.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.