Browse results

The series Corpus Avesticum is designed to provide a forum for new editions of Avestan texts. It includes works by different authors on the transmission of the Avesta and editions of Avestan texts and their exegesis in Pahlavi and Sanskrit. The editions will be based on a fresh collation of the manuscripts available today and on a critical analysis of the manuscript tradition. Editions would vary according to the focus individual authors have chosen for their work.
The series comprises three types of works. The first type would be editions of the ritual Avesta. They provide the Avestan text of complete rituals together with a text-critical apparatus. The second type comprises editions of the Avestan, Pahlavi or Sanskrit versions of a text with translation, commentary and dictionary of that particular text. Depending on the size of the text, the edition would be either of a complete text, or of a constituent part of a larger text (such as, for example, part of the Yasna). The third type comprises analyses of the history and dependencies of the manuscripts.

Edited by John Peterson and Shobhana Chelliah

Brill’s Studies in South and Southwest Asian Languages (BSSAL) is a peer-reviewed series that provides a venue for high-quality descriptive and theoretical studies on the languages of South and Southwest Asia, both monograph-length studies as well as multi-authored volumes dealing with particular topics. The series also welcomes contributions on educational aspects of South and Southwest Asian languages, including language textbooks and other educational materials.

In the political sense, South Asia encompasses the seven independent states of Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, the Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan and Sri Lanka, but linguistically and culturally also includes some adjacent areas to the east and north, notably Tibet. Southwest Asia is understood here as comprising the Iranian language-speaking territory to the west of South Asia, i.e., the states of Afghanistan and Iran and the geocultural transnational region Kurdistan, consisting of parts of Turkey, Iraq, Iran and Syria.

The languages – both ancient and modern – of South and Southwest Asia have played a central role in linguistics from the field’s very beginnings as a modern scientific endeavor, and continue to occupy a central position in discussions in many linguistic sub-disciplines, including the following, among others:

• phonology
• morphology
• syntax
• historical linguistics
• sociolinguistics
• typology and language universals
• multilingualism
• areal studies
• heritage languages
• writing systems

The series seeks high-quality, state-of-the-art contributions on all aspects of the languages of this linguistically diverse and fascinating area.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.

Walter Spink

The twenty-nine Buddhist caves near Ajanta form a devotional complex which ranks as one of the world's most startling achievements, created at the very apogee of India's Golden Age.
Ajanta: History and Development, to appear as part of the series Handbook of Oriental Studies, presents the reader with a systematic treatment of all aspects of the site, the result of forty years of painstaking research in situ by Walter M. Spink.
The Supplement to the Groningen Oriental Studies publishes the critical edition and study of the Skandapurāṇa. The series is published under the auspices of the J. Gonda Foundation (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences).

The series published three volumes over the last 5 years.
The Gonda Indological Studies publishes scholarly works in the field of classical Indology since 1994. The series is published under the auspices of the J. Gonda Foundation (Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences). It contains monographs and collected volumes on topics such as the (cultural) history, material culture, literature, languages, philosophy and religions of South Asia. From 2013 onwards the series will be merged with the Groningen Oriental Studies (GOS), which focuses on philological works, critical editions of texts in Sanskrit and New Indo-Aryan languages, as well as text-related studies.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.

Edited by Johannes Bronkhorst

The civilisation of India, marked by an ancient and vast cultural heritage with a strong character of its own, is among the oldest continuous and most seminal of the world, influencing as it does the thought and action of the population of nearly the whole of Asia. The vitality of its tradition still continues to fascinate Man all over the world today.
Brill's Indological Library is concerned with the languages, history and native cultures of South Asia. Subjects include Hinduism, Indian Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism; political, social and economic history; philosophy; literature; languages; native science; performing art; law; the State; foreign relations, and manifestations of the Indian radiance or presence abroad; et cetera.
The series includes monographs on substantial subjects, thematic collections of articles, text editions, and translations. The volumes are in English.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Indian Thought

(Discontinued series)

Edited by Purushottama Bilimoria

Scholarly studies of Indian philosophy, including analysis of western philosophy from an Indian philosophical perspective.