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East and West

Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions

The era of globalization has witnessed increasing activities across border and interactions between nations, especially between the East and the West. East and West: Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions aims to trace and investigate multiple-dimensional interactions between the East and the West from the Age of Sail to the Modern Era, culturally, socially, economically and diplomatically, with a focus on maritime history via and centered on port cities such as Macao, Goa, Melaka, Nagasaki in the East and their counterparts such as Lisbon, Seville, Amsterdam, London in the West. The series examines matters about empires, oceans, and human connections through changes in material lives and cultural politics, and analyzes the impact of the flow of cultural materials across oceans, such as artifacts, arts, goods, foods, books, knowledge, beliefs, etc., on port cities and urbanization. Particularly, it will provide readers with a new maritime vision of the East and Southeast Asian history of connections at the eastern end of the Maritime Silk Road, including the ports of East Indian Ocean and South China Sea: places from Nagasaki to Xiamen/Macao, from Singapore to Shanghai, from Hong Kong to Melbourne, etc. In doing so, it will unfold the process of formation and transformation of networks and fluxing space, generated or altered by trade, migrations, diplomacies, regional conglomerations, etc., illustrate the glocolization of religions, examine the relationship of culture/tradition and diplomatic strategy, and demonstrate the causes to miscommunication, misunderstanding, conflicts and confrontations between nations as well as appropriate reading, understanding and interpreting of each other.
East and West will include studies in such disciplines and area studies as maritime history, missionary history, intellectual history, international relations, arts, architecture, music, religious studies, and cultural studies. This series will feature monographs and edited volumes as well as translated works. It will be of interest to academics as well as general readers, including historians, artists, architects, diplomats, politicians, journalists, travelers, religious groups, businessmen, lawyers, among other groups.
The Zhuang are a Tai-speaking people and China’s most populous minority. This series presents critical editions of traditional Zhuang texts, written in a character script based on Chinese but modified to represent the Zhuang language. Each volume will present a single text or a number of texts from the same locality or region, including ritual texts, song texts, play scripts, and other genres. Together, these works will serve to introduce many different aspects of Zhuang cultural life to an international readership.

This is a new series with an average of 0,5 volumes per year.

Edited by Merle Calvin Ricklefs and Bruce Lockhart

Brill’s Southeast Asian Library (SEAL) presents scholarly readers with outstanding scholarship covering all regions of Southeast Asia, especially mainland Southeast Asia, on topics from the past to the present day. Featuring both monographs and edited volumes, it offers rigorously peer-reviewed and enduring contributions from the full spectrum of humanities and social science disciplines.
Will the twenty-first century be the Asian century? Will the People’s Republic of China (PRC) overtake the United States as the leading global superpower? Will an institutionalised Third Bloc emerge in international relations and challenge the transatlantic alliance that has dominated world politics for such a long time? While opinions on the details differ strongly, there seems to be a certain consensus that the East Asian region, roughly defined as Northeast Asia (Greater China, the two Koreas, Japan and the Russian Far East) plus Southeast Asia (the ten members states of ASEAN), will be globally significant in the years to come and see its role growing. Such a role includes almost all fields such as economics, science and technology, migration, culture, and international relations. These issues are interrelated and often overlap.

This series, therefore, takes as its main focus the field of international relations post-WWII that pertain to the region and in particular the question of collective security and related issues, including options for institutionalised mechanisms of a joint regional security policy. The need for such a focus has become increasingly obvious: shifts in the global balance of power, as well as a multitude of conflicts in the region, some old and unresolved, some new and emerging, actual or potential, call for ongoing detailed appraisal and sustainable solutions.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Bart Barendregt, Ariel Heryanto and Merlyna Lim

Southeast Asia Mediated deals with media in Southeast Asia. Both old and new media, mass, alternative and grass roots, both today and in the past.

Edited by Gerry van Klinken

The series examines social struggles and their connection with the particularity of places in Southeast Asia. The declining potency of national states is shifting more scholarly attention to locally rooted contentions. Local politics are becoming a major focus of study in the region. From the slums to luxurious malls, from logging camps to coastal reefs, movements of identity and common interests are challenging the great homogeneities that once characterised our thinking about the nation-state. Whether they revolve around bureaucratic resources, housing, land, forests or water, they deploy cultural themes that mix memories of tradition with intimations of modernity. The series will embrace an ecumenicity of innovative approaches within the humanities, social and political sciences, while retaining a central role for 'power' and 'place'.

Edited by Leonard Blussé

This series on the history of Asian-European Interaction is the outcome of the spectacularly successful TANAP (Towards a New Age of Partnership) program that was carried out at Leiden University from 2001 to 2006 by a score of young Asian, South African and European scholars. In search of a better understanding of Asian-European interaction in early modern Monsoon Asia the authors strove to match their researches in the depositories of the former Dutch East India Company (VOC) in archives at The Hague, Cape Town, Colombo, Madras, and Jakarta with local Asian sources and the latest scholarly literature. As such, these monographs provide new insights into the integration of the Asian theatre into global history.
The TANAP program was directed by the staffs of the History Department of Leiden University and the National Archives in The Hague in close cooperation with colleagues and supervisors from various academic and archival institutions in Asia and South Africa. It was funded by the Netherlands Ministry of Education, Culture and Science; the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO); the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs; the Netherlands UNESCO Commission; and several private foundations in Asia and Europe.
The TANAP Monographs series is produced by the History Department of Leiden University, which also publishes the research journal Itinerario. International Journal on the History of European Expansion and Global Interaction.

The series published two volumes over the last 5 years.