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The primary focus of this new peer-reviewed monograph series will be the study of Christianity in East Asia. It will reflect “local” (i.e. Chinese, Japanese and Korean) themes as well as comparative perspectives that explore the historical, cultural, and religious connections that mark the interactions between these countries. Subject matter may include but is not limited to: church history, cultural anthropology, historical linguistics, history of science and medicine, global history, and comparative studies. The series will also include critical studies of primary sources related to the history of Christianity in East Asia and/or critical translations of those sources, with accompanying commentary and critical apparatus. Influential works in the field hitherto published only in Japanese, Chinese, or Korean respectively will be carefully selected, translated into English, and made available to an international audience with the aim of promoting scholarly dialogue beyond local linguistic constituencies.

The Editors welcome inquiries from prospective authors. For more information concerning the series and the manuscript submission process, please contact Stephen Ford, Editorial Assistant, at riccimonographs@usfca.edu.
The series will be of interest to anybody interested in questions of cosmopolitan and vernacular in the Sinographic Cosmopolis—specifically, with respect to questions of language, writing and literary culture, embracing both beginnings (the origins of and early sources for writing in the sinographic sphere) and endings (the disintegration of the Sinographic Cosmopolis in places like Korea, Japan and Vietnam, and the advent of linguistic modernity throughout all of the old Sinitic sphere. In addition, the series will feature comparative research on interactions and synergies in language, writing and literary culture in the Sinographic Cosmopolis over nearly two millennia, as well as studies of the 'sinographic hangover' in modern East Asia-critical and comparative assessments of the social and cultural history of language and writing and linguistic thought in modern and premodern East Asia.

East and West

Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions

The era of globalization has witnessed increasing activities across border and interactions between nations, especially between the East and the West. East and West: Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions aims to trace and investigate multiple-dimensional interactions between the East and the West from the Age of Sail to the Modern Era, culturally, socially, economically and diplomatically, with a focus on maritime history via and centered on port cities such as Macao, Goa, Melaka, Nagasaki in the East and their counterparts such as Lisbon, Seville, Amsterdam, London in the West. The series examines matters about empires, oceans, and human connections through changes in material lives and cultural politics, and analyzes the impact of the flow of cultural materials across oceans, such as artifacts, arts, goods, foods, books, knowledge, beliefs, etc., on port cities and urbanization. Particularly, it will provide readers with a new maritime vision of the East and Southeast Asian history of connections at the eastern end of the Maritime Silk Road, including the ports of East Indian Ocean and South China Sea: places from Nagasaki to Xiamen/Macao, from Singapore to Shanghai, from Hong Kong to Melbourne, etc. In doing so, it will unfold the process of formation and transformation of networks and fluxing space, generated or altered by trade, migrations, diplomacies, regional conglomerations, etc., illustrate the glocolization of religions, examine the relationship of culture/tradition and diplomatic strategy, and demonstrate the causes to miscommunication, misunderstanding, conflicts and confrontations between nations as well as appropriate reading, understanding and interpreting of each other.
East and West will include studies in such disciplines and area studies as maritime history, missionary history, intellectual history, international relations, arts, architecture, music, religious studies, and cultural studies. This series will feature monographs and edited volumes as well as translated works. It will be of interest to academics as well as general readers, including historians, artists, architects, diplomats, politicians, journalists, travelers, religious groups, businessmen, lawyers, among other groups.
Over the past decades a vast amount of often full-text searchable newspaper and other source material from modern East Asia have been made available for research, much of which is in Western languages. The sheer wealth of detail has brought new challenges to research on the region in terms of methodology and theory. Studies on Modern East Asian History is the prime publication vehicle for monographs and edited volumes on the period of large-scale Western interaction with the region from the Opium Wars in the mid-nineteenth century right up to the Korean War in the early 1950s.

Edited by Seokwoo Lee and Zou Keyuan

This series serves as a platform to promote East Asian maritime studies. The region’s dynamic economic development and complex history has sparked a lively debate amongst academics and policymakers struggling to maintain lasting peace and security in Pacific waters. While narrowing in on the impacts of international law in East Asian seas, the series also promotes a multi-disciplinary lens of the issue across several social sciences including international relations, economics, politics, strategic studies and law of the sea. The series aims to publish innovative works from leading scholars in the field.

The Zhuang are a Tai-speaking people and China’s most populous minority. This series presents critical editions of traditional Zhuang texts, written in a character script based on Chinese but modified to represent the Zhuang language. Each volume will present a single text or a number of texts from the same locality or region, including ritual texts, song texts, play scripts, and other genres. Together, these works will serve to introduce many different aspects of Zhuang cultural life to an international readership.

This is a new series with an average of 0,5 volumes per year.

Edited by Longxi Zhang and Wiebke Denecke

With the increasing international importance of East Asia in economic, political, and cultural terms, more and more readers are interested in better understanding this part of the world which can boast long-standing histories and traditions as well as vibrating modern cultures. This book series publishes substantial comparative research on the literary and cultural traditions of premodern and modern East Asia and their relation to the world. It welcomes in particular forms of comparative analysis that combine the depth of area-study-expertise and philology with theoretical acumen and a courageous orientation towards fundamental questions.
The series aims to showcase original research on the methodology and practice of comparison in three main areas: intra-Asian comparisons of China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam; East-West comparisons that examine Western alongside East Asian traditions and explore their historical encounters and cultural interactions; and multi-polar studies that examine East Asian literatures and cultures in light of their relations with India, the Middle East, Africa, or Latin America. The series focuses on the core humanities such as literature, history, religion, philosophy and thought, art history, and archaeology, but also welcomes contributions adopting culturally-informed approaches in anthropology, political science, sociology, or linguistics.
The series is directed at scholars and graduate students of East Asia and, more broadly, comparatists engaged in the study of various literary and cultural traditions around the world. We publish English-language monographs, conference volumes, and, occasionally, English translations of outstanding scholarship in other languages.

The series has published an average of 2,5 volumes per year since 2014.
Brill’s book series Science and Religion in East Asia features scholarly monographs and edited volumes, focusing on the question of how human understanding of the world and its application to various fields of socio-cultural life in East Asian societies were shaped in the context of religious thought and practices, notably those of Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism.
Recent scholarship on the history of European science in medieval and early modern periods has shown that society’s scientific endeavor was inextricably intertwined with spiritual and moral pursuits, classified in modern times as a separate category called "religion". The rich resources in East Asia on both scientific pursuits and moral-religious teachings, enable us to examine the fine texture of relations woven in the course of the continuous interchange of aims, methods, and knowledge between these scientific and moral-religious enterprises.
A special emphasis is put on the relation between science and what is called Confucianism, the most common and dominant thread of thought in East Asian societies. Science and Confucianism developed form and content to a considerable degree under the influence of ideas and techniques from Daoist and Buddhist traditions. From the sixteenth century onwards, they also interacted with Western science that had been developed in Europe dominated by Christianity. Science and Religion in East Asia pays ample attention to the role of these other religions present in East Asia as well and the interaction with other regions of the world.

The series has published one volume since 2014.
Inner Asia, with its rich culture, history, and natural resources, is now receiving increasing world attention following the post-communist geopolitical transformation of the region. Today, there is a burgeoning body of Inner Asian scholarship focusing on individual countries and peoples as well as the region as whole. Archives, once hidden, are at last becoming accessible, providing a wealth of new sources for in-depth research and reappraisal of the administrative, economic, political, religious and social configurations of the region – hence Brill’s Inner Asia Archive (BIAA). This new series recognizes the importance of these developments and encourages ongoing excavation of the emerging rich archival mines for new critical scholarship.

Forming a trio with the Inner Asia journal and Inner Asia Book Series, both associated with the Mongolia and Inner Asia Studies Unit (MIASU) at the University of Cambridge, Brill’s Inner Asia Archive provides an invaluable new platform for the collation and study of original archival sources from Inner Asia.

The series has published one volume since 2013.

Edited by Billy K.L. So and Madeleine Zelin

The economic emergence of East Asia—first Japan, followed by the Little Dragons and Southeast Asia, and the recent rise of China, has produced a paradigm shift in the study of the East Asian regions. Not only has an earlier understanding based on adaptation to Western models given way to a re-evaluation of the interface between the local and the global, but scholarship itself has become increasingly transnational. This is evidenced in hitherto unseen levels of transnational collaboration, conferences and research programs, and the creation of on-line archives and virtual intellectual communities. East Asia, broadly defined to include both northeast and southeast Asia, has contributed greatly to this shift. This series aims at providing a platform for the products of this scholarship, encouraging interdisciplinary, transnational and comparative research on the countries and peoples of the East Asian region, and their regional and global interactions. In an effort to reflect the full range of collaborations that are now taking place across the globe this series will feature monographs and edited volumes as well as translated works that explore the global processes of change in East Asia and the historical role of East Asia in the creation of the institutions, ideas, and practices that constitute our contemporary world.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.