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Reflection in the social sciences is linked to the development of the Western society which saw its birth. The social sciences and humanities have developed very considerably in the last decades in different Asian countries, where both theoretical approaches and theoretical methodologies have been constantly changing. As a result of the circulation and globalisation of knowledge, new centres and new peripheral areas have been formed and new hierarchies have quietly emerged, giving rise in turn to new competitive environments in which innovative knowledge is being produced. The centres in which knowledge in the social sciences and humanities is produced have moved towards Asia. We are entering a new phase of global intellectual life after Western hegemony. The aim of this series is to produce a post-Western space in which knowledge is produced that is both specific and shared and in which theories and methodologies are gathered together on the basis of very different histories and traditions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Jennifer Obdam.

Submissions of an interdisciplinary nature are strongly encouraged.
The social sciences in China and the U.S. have come to be rather heavily dominated by abstract theorizing divorced from practical realities. What this series proposes to emphasize instead is actual economic and legal, and historical and social practices, and the theoretical logics evidenced therein. The theoretical works included in the series proceed not from theory to practice, but rather from practice to theory; the empirical studies included are ones of important theoretical implications.

We propose to include selected major works in each of five sub-series, to be published simultaneously in both English and Chinese, or, where the work is already available in one language (English or Chinese), then its translation into the other. The five sub-series include one each in the history and theory of legal practice, the economic history and economics of practice, and the social history and sociology of practice. The fourth series consists of broader cross-disciplinary works in historical political economy, in the tradition of the likes of Adam Smith, Karl Marx, and Max Weber. The fifth series includes major innovations evident in Chinese economic, legal, social, and political-economic practices that have yet to receive full theoretical elaboration.

The series should be of interest to the well informed general reader and students as well as scholars and researchers in the relevant disciplines and areas of focus.

The series has published an average of one volume per year since 2014.
Since the 1970s, the world has been facing fundamental social change at both the macro-level, such as the impact of globalization and the restructuring of the welfare state, and at the micro-level with issues relating to family and individual lives. It is increasingly accepted that the type of welfare regime heavily influences people’s decision to marry or to have children as well as the relationship between genders. Likewise, the transnational migration of care-workers impacts on the way of life and quality of life of the elderly in the growing number of aged societies around the world as well as on the workers’ own families back in their home countries.

This series linking family research, social policy and migration studies, sets out to shed light at many levels and in a wide variety of contexts on this key twenty-first century issue that could be termed a “reconstruction of the intimate and the public” from an interdisciplinary and global perspective. There is a special focus on Asia where dynamic social changes are resulting in unsustainable societies with extremely low fertility; yet it is such countries that are witnessing the rise in marriage migration to fill the gender gap caused by a skewed sex ratio at birth. Also addressed are issues arising from the alleged convergence of European welfare retrenchment on the one hand, and on the other, the Asian struggle to establish basic welfare state structures at a time of state budget cuts thereby posing the fundamental question regarding the nature of sustainable welfare provision.

The first volume of the IPAP series Ryōsai Kenbo: The Educational Ideal of 'Good Wife, Wise Mother' in Modern Japan has won the 2013 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award.
The third volume of the IPAP series Asian Women and Intimate Work has won the 2014 Choice Outstanding Academic Title Award.

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The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.