Jewish Latin America

Issues and Methods

Edited by Raanan Rein

Jewish Latin America: Issues and Methods aims at expanding the boundaries of this field of inquiry devoted to Jewish experiences in Latin America and the Caribbean. Open to original studies in the Humanities and Social Sciences, it hopes to transcend disciplinary borders. This new series welcomes research on a variety of issues and groups that have not received sufficient attention in the historiography. Thus, for example, both affiliated and non-affiliated Jews will be considered, as well as Zionists and non-Zionists, and Ashkenazi and Sephardic Jews. Gender and social issues and popular culture will also figure prominently.

A comparative approach, challenging particularistic emphases, is encouraged, as well as studies of national vs. trans-national ties, and new approaches to the study of ethnicity and Diaspora. Attention will be given not only to the bigger communities of Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico but also to smaller communities in Central America, the Caribbean and South America. Both monographic studies and edited volumes will be published. All manuscripts will be peer reviewed before publication.

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Alexander Kulik

The series is uniquely devoted to Judeo-Slavic studies. It covers all aspects of the history and culture of Jews in the Slavic world and the encounter between Jewish and Slavic cultures (including language, literature, and arts) from the Middle Ages to the present day. The series aims to provide a forum for the growing interest and research in the field across disciplines. It welcomes monographs, collected volumes, and editions of primary sources.

Submission Information:
Proposals may be submitted to Alexander Kulik ( akulik@mscc.huji.ac.il) and should include a brief (up to one page) description including the following items: author(s)/editor(s) names with addresses and affiliations; tentative title; topic; scope; significance; research method; innovation; relation to/difference from similar publications; target audience; date of submission; and provisional table of contents (optional).

The series published an average of one volume per year for the last 5 years.

Review of Rabbinic Judaism

Ancient, Medieval, and Modern

Edited by Alan Avery-Peck

The Review of Rabbinic Judaism, the first and only annual to focus upon Rabbinic Judaism in particular, will publish principal articles, essays on method and criticism, systematic debates ( Auseindersetzungen), occasional notes, long book reviews, reviews of issues of scholarly journals, assessments of textbooks and instructional materials, and other media of academic discourse, scholarly and educational alike.
The Review fills the gap in the study of Judaism, which is left by the prevailing division of Rabbinic Judaism among the standard historical periods (ancient, medieval, modern) that in fact do not apply; and by the common treatment of the Judaism in bits and pieces (philosophy, mysticism, law homiletics, institutional history, for example). No annual in "Jewish studies" focuses upon the study of religion, let alone upon the single most important Judaism of all time.

As of 2006 this book series was continued as part of the journal Review of Rabbinic Judaism.
This series publishes works on the history, culture, and literature of early Judaism. The chronological scope of the series roughly encompasses Judaism of the Second Temple (post-exilic Judaism from the Persian period up to the decline of the Jewish state in the late first and early second centuries CE). The literary corpus comprehended by the series includes, but is not limited to, Hellenistic Jewish authors, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and the Jewish apocrypha and pseudepigrapha. Work on rabbinic literature that deals with Second Temple Judaism will also be considered.

IJS Studies in Judaica

Conference Proceedings of the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College London

Edited by Markham (Mark) Geller, François Guesnet and Ada Rapoport-Albert

The IJS Studies in Judaica series is primarily devoted to the publication of annual conferences of the Institute of Jewish Studies, University College London, although individual monographs are also welcome on any aspect of Jewish Studies and related disciplines. The volumes bring together, often for the first time, eminent scholars from different countries working in historical, literary, and linguistic research areas relevant to all periods of Jewish Studies, from antiquity to modernity. Examples of themes include biblical studies (within the ancient world), medieval Hebrew science, and history of Zionism, with the aim being to cover the latest trends in cutting-edge research in Jewish Studies in its broadest context.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Eliezer Ben-Rafael, Yosef Gorny and Judit Bokser Liwerant

This series brings together contributions addressing the question of the unity versus conflict, closeness versus alienation, and convergence versus divergence entrenched in the infinite variety of collective identities illustrated by Jews in this era. The titles included investigate—each volume under its own angle—the principles, narratives, visions and commands which constitute in different places the essentials of Jewishness. As a rule, they ask whether or not one is still allowed to speak, at the beginning of this new century, of one—single and singular—Jewish People. Hence, this series is a podium for researchers of Judaism and the Jewish condition all over the world—from Israel to the United States, and from there to Argentina and Brazil as well as Russia, Ukraine or France, England and Germany. These investigations should yield an understanding of how far Judaism is still one while Jewishness is multifarious. The perspectives offered may draw from sociology and the social sciences as well as from history and the humanities in general. This series aspires to constitute a meeting point for them all. It will be of interest not only to scholars in Jewish Studies but also to anyone interested in the theory and practice of major phenomena of our time like transnational diasporas, the globalization of ethnicity, and present-day relations of religiosity and laicity which, in one way or another, are akin to the preoccupations of researchers in the field of Jewish identities.

The series published an average of four volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Studies in Jewish History and Culture aims to present a wide spectrum of studies that cover Jewish history, society, and culture from antiquity to the present. The series seeks to highlight diversity within Judaism as well as the interaction between Jewish and non-Jewish civilizations. Encompassing all geographical areas and all periods in the history of Judaism, this series specializes in intellectual history, translations and translation process, folklore and daily life, and literature and literary theory.

The series published an average of 3,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Alan Avery-Peck and William Scott Green

The Brill Reference Library of Judaism presents research on fundamental problems in the study of the authoritative texts, beliefs and practices, events and ideas, of the Judaic religious world from the Hellenistic period to the present. Systematic accounts of principal phenomena characteristic of Judaic life, works of a theoretical character, accounts of movements and trends, diverse expressions of the faith, all will find a place in the series, alongside new translations of and commentaries on classical texts.

The series published an average of 3,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Rosanna Urbani and Guido Zazzu

These volumes of the "Documentary History of the Jews in Italy", illustrate the history of the Jews in Genoa and surroundings from Antiquity to the French Revolution. The earliest documentary evidence takes the form of letters from King Theodoric. For the Middle Ages the documentation is relatively fragmentary and sporadic. Later there is greater abundance of historical evidence, which portrays chiefly the destinies of the Jews in the Republic from the sixteenth century on, when the presence of the Jews became permanent and a regular community was established also in the capital.
The historical records presented illustrate mainly the relationship between the government of the Genoese Republic and the Jews, the latter's economic activities and their communal and social life. Some of the detailed descriptions of the Jewish population in Genoa, their living conditions and occupations, allow for a close examination of the social conditions of this Northern Italian community. For a while Genoa became a haven of refuge for some of the exiles from Spain, including the historian Joseph Hacohen and members of the Abarbanel family. The volumes are provided with an extensive introduction, bibliography, glossary and indexes.

The Annual of Rabbinic Judaism

Ancient, Medieval and Modern

Edited by Jacob Neusner, William Scott Green and Alan Avery-Peck

The Annual of Rabbinic Judaism, Ancient, Medieval, and Modern, the first and only journal to focus upon Rabbinic Judaism in particular, will publish principal articles, essays on method and criticism, systematic debates ( Auseindersetzungen), occasional notes, long book reviews, reviews of issues of scholarly journals, assessments of textbooks and instructional materials, and other media of academic discourse, scholarly and educational alike.
The Annual fills the gap in the study of Judaism, the religion, which is left by the prevailing division of Rabbinic Judaism among the standard historical periods (ancient, medieval, modern) that in fact do not apply; and by the common treatment of the Judaism in bits and pieces (philosophy, mysticism, law homiletics, institutional history, for example). Scholarship presently obscures the fundamental unity and continuity of Rabbinic Judaism from beginning to the present. No journal in "Jewish studies" focuses upon the study of religion, let alone upon the single most important Judaism of all time. That is why this new journal is required.