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Edited by Nathan Abrams, Steven Fine, Diana Matut, Edna Nahshon and Ilia Rodov

The Open Jerusalem Book Series at Brill will be dedicated to discovering, revealing and connecting different archives and sources in order to investigate the ordinary, entangled history of a global city through the lens of the concept of urban citizenship ( citadinité). Citadinité is for a city what nationality is for a country and materializes itself in institutions, actors and practices. The project provides a bottom–up history of Jerusalem, a perspective that has been neglected by historians of the city, who have been generally preoccupied with ideological and geostrategic issues. This history is also a connected one because, within a complex documentary archipelago, the researchers seek points of contact revealing the exchanges, interactions, conflicts and, at times, hybridizations between different populations and traditions. The Series will go even beyond the chronological limits of the project. Its ambition is to cover Jerusalem’s history during the entire 19th and 20th centuries. The Series’ will publish important original monographs and translated texts, which will be the outcome of extensive research at the different archives of Jerusalem. These works will not be published only in the traditional print form but also in Open Access in order to comply with the ERC guidelines for dissemination of research results.

Edited by Hava Tirosh-Samuelson and Aaron W. Hughes

The Library of Contemporary Jewish Philosophers showcases outstanding Jewish thinkers who have made lasting contributions to constructive Jewish philosophy in the second half of the 20th century. Each volume is devoted to one particular thinker and is meant to show the thinker’s relationship to the Jewish philosophical past and to contemporary Jewish existence. Each volume follows the same structure: an overview essay, several seminal essays by the philosopher, an interview with the editors, and a select bibliography of 120 items. Together the volumes in the Library of Contemporary Jewish Philosophers will feature the diversity and vitality of contemporary Jewish philosophy, will stimulate discussion on Jewish philosophical response to contemporary challenges, and will chart new paths for Jewish philosophy in the 21st century.

Available in print and electronically, the books in the Library of Contemporary Jewish Philosophers will be ideal for use in diverse educational settings (e.g., college-level courses, rabbinic seminaries, adult Jewish learning, and interreligious dialogue).

The series Library of Contemporary Jewish Philosophers is generously supported by the Baron Foundation.

The series has published an average of 8,5 volumes per year since 2013.



Edited by Meira Polliack and Michael G. Wechsler

Karaite Judaism emerged in the 9th century—an exciting and challenging new stream of medieval Jewish identity and thought which challenged the notions of traditional rabbinic Judaism by rejecting, on the one hand, the sanctified tradition of Jewish oral law and the authority of the ancient Rabbis, while on the other hand re-centering on the text of Hebrew Bible as the sole source of Jewish religion. This Brill subseries, entitled Karaite Texts and Studies, edited by Meira Polliack (Tel-Aviv University) and Michael G. Wechsler (Moody Bible Institute, Chicago) serves as a locus of investigation into medieval Karaism, based on the testimony of its extensive written remains. The recent efflorescence of scholarship on Karaism has provided the impetus for the establishment of the Karaite Texts and Studies series which appears in association with Études sur le judaïsme medieval . The series focuses on the “Golden Age” of Karaism in the Near East (the 10th through 12th centuries) and it covers all genres of Karaite literature, written in Hebrew, Judaeo-Arabic, or other languages.