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Studies on East Asian Religions seeks to break through the barriers between academic disciplines, sectarian divisions and geographical borders, in the scholarship on the religions of East Asia by bringing together scholars and sources that have not often been in dialogue before. Its field of research is the vast array of newly-available primary sources for the doctrines and practices of East Asian Religions.
By promoting research that assembles material from across East Asia (the area in which, historically, written Chinese was a major language of religion and culture), this book series will make possible a broader view of regional interactions that does not privilege one locale or one vector of exchange. To do so, it will be essential to publish work in English by scholars from and of all parts of East Asia alongside that of researchers working in Europe and North America.
The series will accept regular monographs, edited volumes, translations and occasionally collected volumes, all subject to peer review.
The Zhuang are a Tai-speaking people and China’s most populous minority. This series presents critical editions of traditional Zhuang texts, written in a character script based on Chinese but modified to represent the Zhuang language. Each volume will present a single text or a number of texts from the same locality or region, including ritual texts, song texts, play scripts, and other genres. Together, these works will serve to introduce many different aspects of Zhuang cultural life to an international readership.

This is a new series with an average of 0,5 volumes per year.
Brill’s book series Science and Religion in East Asia features scholarly monographs and edited volumes, focusing on the question of how human understanding of the world and its application to various fields of socio-cultural life in East Asian societies were shaped in the context of religious thought and practices, notably those of Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism.
Recent scholarship on the history of European science in medieval and early modern periods has shown that society’s scientific endeavor was inextricably intertwined with spiritual and moral pursuits, classified in modern times as a separate category called "religion". The rich resources in East Asia on both scientific pursuits and moral-religious teachings, enable us to examine the fine texture of relations woven in the course of the continuous interchange of aims, methods, and knowledge between these scientific and moral-religious enterprises.
A special emphasis is put on the relation between science and what is called Confucianism, the most common and dominant thread of thought in East Asian societies. Science and Confucianism developed form and content to a considerable degree under the influence of ideas and techniques from Daoist and Buddhist traditions. From the sixteenth century onwards, they also interacted with Western science that had been developed in Europe dominated by Christianity. Science and Religion in East Asia pays ample attention to the role of these other religions present in East Asia as well and the interaction with other regions of the world.

The series has published one volume since 2014.