Browse results

The series Documenta Coranica is dedicated to the study of history of the Qurʾānic text as manifested in manuscripts and other sources. Documenta Coranica publishes witnesses of the Qurʾān from the early period in the shape of facsimile, accompanied by transcription and a commentary. The series makes codices on parchment, papyri, inscriptions, variant readings and other relevant sources for the history of the Qurʾān, accessible to the academic public. The first volumes contain manuscript fragments from Sanaa (DAM 01-25.1, DAM 01-27.1, DAM 01-29.1), the manuscript Ma VI 165 (Tübingen), and the codex Or. 2165 of the British Library.


The series comprises two sections: Manuscripta contains facsimile editions of Qurʾānic manuscripts with a line-by-line transcript in Modern Arabic script on the opposite page and a commentary about codicology, paleography, variant readings and verse numbering explaining content and characteristics of each manuscript. Testimonia et Studia contains studies about material evidence for the history of the Qurʾān, as manifested on papyrus, stone and rock inscriptions etc., as well in exegetical, narrative and philological sources.


Documenta Coranica inscribes itself into a German-French cooperation: in the framework of the research project Coranica, 2011-2014, and Paleocoran 2015-2018, both funded by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft and the Agence Nationale de la Recherche.

Edited by Jorge Ledo

This new series publishes high quality philological editions of a selected number of influential works or authors forbidden by the Iberian Inquisition, or challenging the idea of an Imperial Spain/Portugal. The volumes are all accompanied by studies by leading scholars in the field. An important criterion for inclusion in the series is that the chosen text is either unpublished or does not have a modern, scholarly edition. As such, the series presents a highly innovative content. The series will reflect the cultural and intellectual production of all Iberian authors, Jewish and Morisco authors, but also of reformers and/or Catholic authors who challenged prevalent religious, political, or literary discourse.

The series has published one volume since 2014.

Edited by Michael B. Winship

The Industrial World is a peer-reviewed series that explores the ways that industrialization has shaped the production, distribution, and reception of books from the beginning of the nineteenth century to the present day. This period is marked by the introduction of new technologies – not just of manufacture, but also of transportation and communication – that have profoundly altered the ways that books are created and circulated and that have, among other things, enabled the rise of international publishing conglomerates that can reach a global mass market. The series investigates every aspect of the book in the industrial world, from the reorganization of the book and publishing trades to the present impact of digital texts and the internet.

Edited by Richard Gameson

The Manuscript World investigates the forms, functions and impact of books, individually and collectively, in their cultural contexts, from Antiquity to the Renaissance. Extending from the era of roll books, through that of the monastic scriptorium and then on, via the age of professional scribes and illuminators serving scholars and princes, to the point when manuscript-makers were responding to the challenge of printing, this long period embraces a sequence of profound changes in the nature of the book. The Manuscript World accordingly explores the many roles of the hand-written book in all its manifestations, across more than a millennium of human history.
The Library of the Written Word is an international peer-reviewed book series that publishes monographs, edited volumes, source materials and bibliographies on a variety of subjects, related to the history of the book, magazines and newspapers. The series consists of three subseries, each one covering a particular period: The Manuscript World, The Handpress World, and The Industrial World.

The series invites studies in codicology, palaeography, typography, economic history of the trade and the technology of printing. Analytical bibliographies as well as editions of key sources can be included, and studies on the cultural and political role and impact of the written word are also welcome. Where possible, the economic aspects of the book trade should be included in studies published in this series.

The series published an average of six volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Andrew Pettegree

The Handpress World explores the impact of the invention of printing by moveable type from the first experiments of the incunabula age through to the end of the eighteenth century. In this crucial period of book history the new technology both transformed established markets for scholarly and religious literature and found a new public through the rise of the pamphlet and later the newspaper. The series will investigate every aspect of this cultural transformation, from the promotion in print of the great intellectual movements of the day through to the birth of the public library.
Costerus is a longstanding book series for state-of-the-art research in the field of English-language literature(s). Besides the more classical research in English, American and Irish literature, do we offer a platform for new directions in literary studies in relation to translation studies, minority literatures, ecology, medical humanities, hemispheric studies, transatlantic studies, network studies and social sciences, as well as reflections on studies in English literature as a discipline.
All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

The series published an average of five volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Dialogue Online

Critical Works on Anglophone Literature after 1900

What is dialogue? The question invites a response which in itself produces and enriches dialogue.
Within and beyond our subject areas in Literature, Culture and the Humanities we learn by debating texts, both through the enhanced literacy which this develops and from the expansive conversation that proceeds from that literacy at every stage.
The global dimensions of culture and digital media of communication that reframe our contemporary intellectual environment add to this process.

Brill’s Dialogue series embodies one form of the discussion that remains at the very core of subject areas where critically informed dialogue within and around key texts takes place.
With its primary focus on the discussion of texts in modern cultures the series retains the potential to contribute key moments to this process and to stimulate innovation in a form that is suited both to the needs of scholarship and new generations of students to come.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Edited by Erik S. Kooper and Sjoerd Levelt

The articles published in the Yearbook The Medieval Chronicle will not only consist of papers selected from the Medieval Chronicle Conferences, but also of articles submitted independent of these. The International Board of Advisors consists of historians and specialists in literary history. Each volume of the Yearbook is peer reviewed by two members of the editorial committee.

The Medieval Chronicle is published in cooperation with the Medieval Chronicle Society.

The series published three volumes over the last 5 years.
CERMEIL – Centre d'Études et de Recherches sur le Merveilleux, l'Étrange et l'Irréel en Littérature

Series discontinued