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Edited by Gabriele Cornelli and Gábor Betegh

Brill’s Plato Studies Series aims to gather together the most recent and relevant contributions, in order to identify debates and trends within the study of Plato and to provide a holistic understanding of the wide range of issues related to Plato’s philosophy. Of special significance for the series will be the examination of Plato’s literary style and its relationship to his theoretical project as, perhaps, one of the central problems in the study of Plato and Ancient Philosophy as a whole. Even after two thousand years there is still no consensus about why Plato expresses his ideas in such a unique style and the series will aim to address this question. In addition, the Series will warmly welcome contributions focusing on internal and recurrent issues like the relation between myth and philosophy, language, epistemology and ontology in Plato’s work. Special attention will also be given to new interpretative challenges and recent hermeneutical trends, which have emerged from the globalization of current Platonic studies. These new approaches to Plato are likely to change the future frame of Platonic scholarship, providing instruments and renewed impulses for the generations of philosophers to come.
In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.

Edited by Keimpe A. Algra, Jaap Mansfeld, C.J. Rowe, D.T. Runia and Christian Wildberg

Edited by Robert Berchman and John Finamore

Originally conceived, the series covers studies in Platonism, Neoplatonism, and the Platonic Tradition, which means it covers ancient philosophy in general but also the tradition in its medieval, modern, and post-modern "horizons." This means that the subseries publishes works, historically and thematically, across the whole "Platonic tradition."

The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Gregory Sterling and Douwe (David) Runia

This commentary series aims to make Philo’s thought accessible to readers such as graduate students who are just beginning to read him, but also contains much material that will be of interest to specialists in Hellenistic Judaism, ancient philosophy and patristic literature.

The series published one volume over the last 5 years.

Edited by Gary Gurtler and William Wians

The Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy are published annually. The volume brings together the papers and commentaries to reflect the dialogical spirit that characterizes the meetings of the Boston Area Colloquium. The authors are encouraged to revise their presentations in the light of discussion, and their papers are sent to external referees for peer review. Each volume presents the papers of the colloquia of the year in question with the responses given.
The Proceedings are also available in hardback and online.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.
The Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy are published annually. Each volume brings together the papers and commentaries to reflect the dialogical spirit that characterizes the meetings of the Boston Area Colloquium. The authors are encouraged to revise their presentations in the light of discussion, and their papers are sent to external referees for peer review. Each volume presents the papers of the colloquia of the year in question with the responses given.
The Proceedings are also available in paperback and online.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Douwe (David) Runia

Brill's Annotated Bibliographies is a series offering a new set of bibliographical tools in the Classics. We welcome proposals for volumes in this series. The bibliographies would be up to 500 pp. in length and in English. Each volume should provide an exhaustive survey of the authoritative text editions, commentaries, translations, concordances, surveys and electronics tools, important or influential items of the secondary literature (indicating their position and impact in current debate). They should fill a need for scholars active in other (not necessarily adjacent) fields who require a quick and reliable access to the literature of the theme of the bibliography and would be of use to university teachers in preparing customised bibliographies for their students. Ideally, the bibliographies should also call attention to important Italian, German or French works, which are often overlooked by English-speaking students and even scholars.

The contents of most bibliographies will be as follows:
- a general introduction, outlining where possible the development of scholarship on the theme
- the bare facts: title, author, year of publication, type of work (article, book, etc.), size, publisher
- some description of the contents of the work
- an evaluation (in a minority of cases)
- a subject index (cf. Brisson's Plato bibliography in Lustrum)

Transformation of the Roman World

(continued as Brill's Series on the Early Middle Ages)

It is the largest and most ambitious project ever undertaken to map a crucial period in Western civilisation. Some eighteen edited volumes will deal with the period of transition from the Late Roman Empire to the Early Middle Ages (4th-8th centuries) in Western and Central Europe.
A thoroughly interdisciplinary approach to each aspect of the momentous changes during this period ensures important and often unexpected findings. Each volume is the result of the fruitful interaction between archaeologists, historians, art historians, linguists, numismatists and other specialists. This huge research project is sponsored by the European Science Foundation and involves some 150 renowned European scholars.

Theophrastus of Eresus

Sources for His Life, Writings, Thought and Influence

These volumes form part of the large international Theophrastus project started by Brill in 1992 and edited by W.W. Fortenbaugh, R.W. Sharples and D. Gutas. Together with volumes comprising the texts and translations, the commentary volumes provide a new generation of classicists with an up-to-date collection of the fragments and testimonia relating to Theophrastus (c. 370-288/5 B.C), Aristotle's pupil and successor as head of the Lyceum.