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Brill's Companions to Early Modern and Modern History Online is an expanding e-book collection of specially commissioned research companions in early modern and modern history. Peer reviewed and written by experts, these handbooks offer balanced accounts at an advanced level, along with an overview of the state of scholarship and a synthesis of debate, pointing the way for future research. Designed for students and scholars, the books explain what sources there are, what methodologies and approaches are appropriate in dealing with them, what issues arise and how they have been treated, and what room there is for disagreement. The focus of the collection is on the Renaissance and Reformation periods. All volumes are in English.

“These Companions are go-to resources for teaching and research: they gather the latest scholarship on a huge range of authors, themes, and places in medieval and early modern Europe. The electronic format works equally well for reading specific articles, for browsing, and for searching the volumes together in one go. They are especially powerful as a set.”
Ann Blair, Harvard University

“The Brill Companions have already established themselves as the ‘go to’ resource for students and academics who are looking not only for informed evaluation of the latest research as well as indications of the most up-to-date literature on a particular theme and topic, but also for the stimulus to re-evaluate their significance. Collectively they offer both encyclopaedic breadth as well as interpretative depth of treatment.”
Simon Ditchfield, University of York

“The Brill Companions offer sure-footed guides to key issues in Christian and European history, useful for newcomers to a topic and for anyone seeking insights into recent research. Conceptualized and written by the leading scholars in a field, they are indispensable sources of information on fundamental issues and debates.”
Merry Wiesner-Hanks, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Edited by Surekha Davies and Asa Simon Mittman

This innovative series seeks monographs and essay collections that investigate how notions of space, geography, and mapping shaped medieval and early modern cultures. While the history of cartography has traditionally focused on internal developments in European mapping conventions and technologies, pre-modern scribes, illuminators, and printers of maps tended to work in multiple genres. Spatial thinking informed and was informed by multiple epistemologies and perceptions of the order of nature. Maps, Spaces, Cultures therefore integrates the study of cartography and geography within cultural history. It puts genres that reflected and constituted spatial thinking into dialogue with the cultures that produced and consumed them, as well as with those they represented.

The editors welcome submissions from scholars of the histories of art, material culture, colonialism, exploration, ethnography (including that of peoples described as monsters), encounters, literature, philosophy, religion, science and knowledge, as well as of the history of cartography and related disciplines. They encourage interdisciplinary submissions that cross traditional historical, geographical, or methodological boundaries, that include works from outside Western Europe and outside the Christian tradition, and that develop new analytical approaches to pre-modern spatial thinking, cartography, and the geographical imagination.

Edited by Giorgio Caravale, Ralph Keen and J. Christopher Warner

Catholic Christendom, 1300-1700 is devoted to the study of any and all expressions of traditional religion and varieties of religious behavior in the ‘Catholic world’ of the late medieval and early modern periods. The interests of the series are comparative and non-confessional, extending beyond institutional church history and the history of religious thought to include social and cultural history, art history, literary history, the history of the book, the history of science, the history of late medieval and early modern western Christianity in a global context, and above all, interdisciplinary combinations of these and other critical methodologies.

Series Editors: Giorgio Caravale, Roma Tre University, Ralph Keen, University of Illinois at Chicago, J. Christopher Warner, Le Moyne College, Syracuse

This series was published by Ashgate until January 2016. For volumes published before 2016, please contact Routledge, which acquired Ashgate in 2015.

Edited by Bridget Heal

For more than two decades the St Andrews Studies in Reformation History series has consistently published high-quality, original research in the field of early modern religious history. Interpreting the Reformation in its very broadest sense, and consciously fostering an interdisciplinary approach, the series has helped shape not only current interpretations of the Reformation, but views of early modern Institute in general. Focusing initially on ecclesiastical issues surrounding Protestant reform, the series quickly generated research that underlined how the ripples of the Reformation spread to virtually every corner of Europe, both Protestant and Catholic. From family life, education, literature, music, art and philosophy, to political theory, international relations, economics, colonial ventures, science and military matters, there were few aspects of life that remained untouched in some way by the spirit of religious reform. As such, all these topics and many more are dealt with by titles within the series, offering fascinating new perspectives on the formative years of modern Europe.
Alongside research volumes and thematic collections, the series also includes critical editions of important primary sources, bibliographical studies and new translations of influential Reformation works previously unavailable to English speaking scholars. By offering this rich mix of approaches and topics, the St Andrews series continues to provide an invaluable platform for the publication of international scholarship in a dynamic and often controversial area of historical study.

This series was published by Ashgate until January 2016. For volumes published before 2016, please contact Routledge, which acquired Ashgate in 2015.
The Encyclopedia of Early Modern History — to be published in 15 volumes — offers 400 years of early modern history in one work. Experts from all over the world have joined in a presentation of the scholarship on the great era between the mid-15th to the mid-19th centuries. The perspective is European. That does not mean, however, that the view on the rest of the world is blocked. On the contrary: the multifaceted interrelatedness of European and other cultures is scrutinized extensively.

Also available online, the Encyclopedia of Early Modern History addresses major historical questions:
- which ideas, inventions, and events changed people’s lives?
- in which ways did living conditions change?
- how do political, social, and economic developments interlock?
- which major cultural currents have begun to become apparent?
- how did historical interpretation of certain phenomena change?

The individual articles are connected to one another as in a web of red threads. The reader who follows the threads will keep coming upon new and unexpected contexts and links.

This is an English translation of the well-known German-language Enzyklopädie der Neuzeit, published by Metzler Verlag.
Volumes 1-7 have been published in 2016-2019. The upcoming volumes are:
Volume 8: Lauda - Migratory labor
Volume 9: Military - Occultism
Volume 10: Occupation - Politica Christiana
Volume 11: Political journal - Religion, critique of
Volume 12: Religion, history of - Settlers' report
Volume 13: Seven Years' War - Symbol
Volume 14: Symphony - Uomo universale
Volume 15: Urban administration- Zunft revolution, Concluding chapters
Leonardo Studies establishes a forward-thinking approach to a traditional topic. The series seeks to engage with theoretical issues using a variety of methodological approaches. It also includes innovative viewpoints on the more typical problems of translation, influences, critical editions, and cultural transmission. The aim of the series is to offer diverse contributions on Leonardo da Vinci in subjects such as engineering, architecture, anatomy, and astronomy, but also painting, drawing, and sculpture, focusing on only the most recent discoveries by scholars.

Given the expansive nature of Leonardo’s undertakings, volumes draw from collaborations by scholars in the disciplines of literature, history, art history, biology, geology, intellectual history, history of the book, architecture, and others fields. We support the methodologies employed by these diverse fields and encourage scholars participating in the seminars to actively explore new ways of looking at Leonardo.

The Iberian Religious World is a peer-reviewed series which publishes academic works that deal with the different types of religiosity found in the Iberian world. The space of the ‘Iberian world’ is one that changes according to time. If until the end of the fourteenth century it was limited to the space of the Iberian Peninsula, the beginning of the maritime discoveries in the fifteenth century gave it an almost world-size dimension, gradually lost from the eighteenth century onwards. The series will encompass works on Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and also African, Asian and American religions and cults met by, among others, Portuguese and Spaniards during their oversea enterprises. Furthermore, volumes in the series deal with forms of religiosity, cultural relationships with religious minorities, and acculturation processes within the space of the Iberian Peninsula from antiquity to our days. Through monographs, edited volumes, and critical editions of primary sources, the series addresses subjects such as history, theology, art history, literature, philology, music, and other academic fields, whenever the main focus of research is on religion.

The series has published an average of one volume per year since 2014.

Early American History Series

The American Colonies, 1500-1830

Series editors: Jaap Jacobs, L.H. Roper, and Bertrand Van Ruymbeke

The early modern colonization of the Americas ranks among the most influential developments that shaped the modern world. Between the initial exploratory European contacts with the Americas in the late fifteenth century and the eventual independence of American states from Europe lies the multifaceted development of small communities into large colonies, which drew upon their European inheritance and their New World experience and interaction with non-European cultures and societies to form distinctive cultures and identities. The peer-reviewed book series Early American History Series is dedicated to the advancement of scholarly understanding of the history of the colonization of the Americas. It offers explorations on any aspect of early American history to a broad audience of historians. These investigations may be conceived in the broadest way chronologically, geographically, and thematically, whether in explicitly comparative studies, or by the grouping of studies. The book series is housed at the State University of New York—New Paltz (U.S.A.).

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.

The Renaissance Society of America

Texts and Studies Series

Edited by David Marsh

This peer-reviewed series has as its focus the authors and the Latin and vernacular literatures of late medieval and early modern Europe (ca. thirteenth through seventeenth centuries), including those less common literatures that arose within the European cultural sphere. The series publishes editions of primary sources, translations in combination with critical editions, and reference works of enduring value.
Acta Conventus Neo-Latini is a peer-reviewed series offering a world-wide selection of articles on Neo-Latin language and literature (fiction as well as non-fiction), of relevance for all studies in Early Modern History. The contributions have been presented as papers at the conferences arranged every three years by the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies, and together they represent the current state of affairs in the discipline.