Browse results

Chronicles of Contemporary Chinese Social Life includes part of the data collected at the Fudan Data Center for Contemporary Chinese Social Life by Professor Zhang Letian and his team from grassroots society in China, either directly from the owner/author or from collectors who work with the original owner/author. The data is systematic and comprehensive in a self-standing way. All the data that were selected for publication are from a particular rural collective, an urban work-unit, or a residential community and thus reflect the wholeness of the given unit of social life. These data all stretch for a time span of ten years or more, providing enough temporal depth for research and better understanding. These non-aggregated data at the grassroots level systematically reflect the real social life of a particular community over a long time period; they are rich in details for both in-depth case studies and comparative studies. As these kinds of data have never been published before, this publication is truly unique and original.



The targeted readers include China scholars around the world, particularly those whose research focus on contemporary or post-1949 China and/or teaching courses for the same period, graduate students in the same fields for both learning and their own research, and some individuals from the concerned public who want to learn more about Chinese social life by engaging in original and untouched empirical data.

East and West

Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions

The era of globalization has witnessed increasing activities across border and interactions between nations, especially between the East and the West. East and West: Culture, Diplomacy and Interactions aims to trace and investigate multiple-dimensional interactions between the East and the West from the Age of Sail to the Modern Era, culturally, socially, economically and diplomatically, with a focus on maritime history via and centered on port cities such as Macao, Goa, Melaka, Nagasaki in the East and their counterparts such as Lisbon, Seville, Amsterdam, London in the West. The series examines matters about empires, oceans, and human connections through changes in material lives and cultural politics, and analyzes the impact of the flow of cultural materials across oceans, such as artifacts, arts, goods, foods, books, knowledge, beliefs, etc., on port cities and urbanization. Particularly, it will provide readers with a new maritime vision of the East and Southeast Asian history of connections at the eastern end of the Maritime Silk Road, including the ports of East Indian Ocean and South China Sea: places from Nagasaki to Xiamen/Macao, from Singapore to Shanghai, from Hong Kong to Melbourne, etc. In doing so, it will unfold the process of formation and transformation of networks and fluxing space, generated or altered by trade, migrations, diplomacies, regional conglomerations, etc., illustrate the glocolization of religions, examine the relationship of culture/tradition and diplomatic strategy, and demonstrate the causes to miscommunication, misunderstanding, conflicts and confrontations between nations as well as appropriate reading, understanding and interpreting of each other.
East and West will include studies in such disciplines and area studies as maritime history, missionary history, intellectual history, international relations, arts, architecture, music, religious studies, and cultural studies. This series will feature monographs and edited volumes as well as translated works. It will be of interest to academics as well as general readers, including historians, artists, architects, diplomats, politicians, journalists, travelers, religious groups, businessmen, lawyers, among other groups.

Gendering the Trans-Pacific World

Diaspora, Empire, and Race

Series Editors: Catherine Ceniza Choy and Judy Tzu-Chun Wu

This innovative book series explores the gendered nature of the Pacific World by focusing on three phenomena: Diaspora, Empire, and Race. It features how people have dispersed across the Pacific for trade, labor, migration, cultural exchange, and military engagement. These migrations rarely occur in gendered balanced ways, resulting in “bachelor” societies in the receiving country and “stranded” women in the sending country. At other times, female migrants have been in the forefront of migration. The Pacific has also been the site of multiple empires – Asian, European, and American. These colonial powers were invested in managing the gender and sexual relations among and between “natives” and “colonizers.” Finally, the phenomenon of migration and political expansion coincided with racializing processes that established social hierarchies based on naturalized assumptions of biological difference. Here again, gender was essential to these efforts. Gendering the Trans-Pacific World seeks scholarship that offers original approaches to understanding these complex power relations. It welcomes social and cultural history and biography as well as interdisciplinary works that examine art, photography, film, and literature.

Manuscripts should be at least 90,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations and other visual material. The editors will consider proposals for original monographs, edited collections, translations, and critical primary source editions.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.
The Crime and City in History series is a peer reviewed book series that aims to publish works contributing to our knowledge of crime and crime control in cities in the past. Continuing urbanization and the growing importance of cities in the world challenges scholars to explain and solve problems of urban crime, safety, and policing. Urban crime and disorder are not new phenomena, as throughout history, profound urban change has always brought about important problems and fears and has spurred attempts of city authorities to maintain order and control urban space. Historical study of crime and the city may help to gain insight into patterns of crime and disorder across urban space and time and how the urban population, local authorities and media responded to conflict, violence and law-breaking.

The immense use of the online proceedings of the Old Bailey – London’s central criminal court – by scholars and students clearly reflects the great interest in the history of crime and the importance of the urban context (www.oldbaileyonline.org). Crime and criminal justice are inextricably linked to urbanization, poverty, unemployment, social services, and inequality among the urban population. However, there is still a gap in studies that link crime and crime control to the specific social-economic fabric of a city and to the particular organization and uses of urban space.

The main objective of this exciting series is to fill in the gaps in academic publishing on crime and the urban context. The series provides a venue for scholarly work that advances our understanding of the history of crime and crime control in urban settings in any time period and any geographical region.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editors or the publisher at BRILL, Wendel Scholma.

Series Editors: Manon van der Heijden and Margo de Koster.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.
Series Editors: Damian Alan Pargas and Jeff Fynn-Paul

As a practice in which human beings were held captive for an indefinite period of time, coerced into extremely dependent and exploitative power relationships, denied rights (including rights over their labor, lives, and bodies), often vulnerable to forced relocation by various means, and forced to labor against their will, slavery in one form or another predates written records and has existed in innumerable societies. This exciting series provides a venue for scholarly work—research monographs and edited volumes—that advances our understanding of the history of slavery and post-slavery in any period and any geographical region. It fills an important gap in academic publishing and builds upon two relatively recent developments in historical scholarship. First, it provides a world-class outlet for the increased scholarly interest shown in slavery studies in recent years, not only for those working on modern Atlantic societies but also other regions and time periods throughout world history. Second, this series intersects slavery studies with a growing interest in global history among researchers, including global migrations and interactions, warfare, trade routes, and economic expansion. Studies in Global Slavery welcomes submissions that deal with themes such as the development of slave societies and societies with slaves; human trafficking and forced migration; slavery and globalization; slave culture and cultural transfer; political, economic, and ideological causes and effects of slavery; resistance; abolition and emancipation; and memories/legacies of slavery.

Monographs by specialists in the field are especially sought, but multi-authored edited volumes containing academic articles by slavery scholars will also be considered. Manuscripts should be written in English and be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations, tables, maps, and other visual material.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.
Women Writers in History focuses on women authors as a category and in particular on the role they were allowed to play in their respective countries, and beyond national borders in the whole of Europe. We expect lots of new data to be discovered that shed new light on this, provided we take as a starting point the contemporary reception of these women’s writings.
Thanks to important efforts in text digitizing, for instance of the early periodical press and of private correspondences, many of those reception data are becoming available. These data start to be used in order to understand the place female authors should be given in European literary history. The series Women Writers in History – created and coordinated by members of the NEWW Network – provides a platform for the outcome of this kind of research.

The NEWW Network
The NEWW network (New approaches to European Women’s Writing, created 2005) includes researchers studying female authorship in all European countries up to the early 20th century (from Sappho to Virginia Woolf). Together, this international group of scholars:
• organizes annual conferences,
• has developed an online tool ( http://resources.huygens.knaw.nl/womenwriters), which allows stocking, sharing and analyzing historical reception data,
• and carries out large-scale research in order to “rewrite literary history”, in particular, as far as women’s place in it is concerned.

Publications
The series will publish outcomes of collaborative NEWW research, and the Editorial Board invites researchers who would, up to now, not be members of this group to submit proposals for volumes and monographs to be included in the series. Research outcomes to be published here would typically not concern individual authors, but would realize large-scale research taking as a starting point, preferably, empirical data concerning the reception side of literary communication. Research would focus on the communication which had been taking place between these female authors and their (contemporary) readers at home and abroad, and provide insight in the position taken by these women.

Origin
The series Women Writers in History is the result of the “COST Action” entitled “Women Writers In History”. During four years (2009-2013) COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology) as a European funding body, contributed to the further expansion and development of the NEWW network.

Since 2017 the NEWW network formed a working group "Women writers in history: within the DARIAH-EU international network for digital humanities https://www.dariah.eu/activities/working-groups/women-writers-in-history/

German Monitor

(Formerly: GDR-Monitor)

German Monitor (founded in 1979) is a series for themed edited volumes on literature, culture and politics in the German-speaking world since 1945. Our approach is inclusive: some volumes focus on single authors, political figures or genres; other volumes explore themes such as narratives of trauma, German left-wing terrorism, local/global narratives, and cultural relations between Germany and Austria and neighbouring countries.


We welcome proposals for interdisciplinary volumes as well as those with a specifically literary, cultural or political focus. Many of our contributors are based in German Studies, others in disciplines such as Comparative Literature, Film Studies, Musicology, History, Museum Studies, and Political Science. We encourage volumes that push disciplinary boundaries, and those that consider the roles that Germany, Austria, and Switzerland play in Europe today.

The book series has a system of double peer-reviewing. We publish volumes in German or English.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.

European Studies

An Interdisciplinary Series in European Culture, History and Politics (Formerly: Yearbook of European Studies / Annuaire d'Etudes Européennes)

European Studies is an interdisciplinary series in European culture, history and politics, with a special focus on modern and contemporary phenomena.
Formerly known as the Yearbook of European Studies / Annuaire d'Études Européennes (ISSN 0920-4792).
The Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies was founded in 1995, basing itself at the Institute of Germanic Studies of the University of London. Dr Anthony Grenville became Chairman of the Research Centre, whose members are Professor Charmian Brinson, Professor Richard Dove, Dr Marian Malet, Dr Jennifer Taylor, Dr Jana Buresova, Rachel Dickson, Dr Andrea Hammel, Dr Bea Lewkowicz, Sarah MacDougall, Dr Anna Nyburg, Professor Andrea Reiter and Professor Ian Wallace, with Dr Malet and Dr Taylor as Honorary Secretary. The aim of the Research Centre is to promote research in the field of German-speaking exiles in Great Britain. To this end it organises conferences and publishes their proceedings, holds research seminars, and publishes its own peer-reviewed Yearbook. Its members cooperate in the writing of scholarly studies, including a book about the German-speaking refugees from Hitler in Britain, Changing Countries, and a study of the Austrian Centre in London, 1939-47. Though the Research Centre has primarily concerned itself with the German-speaking refugees from Nazism in Britain, it aims to extend its scope to include German-speaking exiles of other periods and comparable groups such as the Czech refugees from Hitler or Italian anti-Fascists. Given its location near the heart of the principal centre of settlement of the refugees from Germany, the Research Centre readily provides advice and useful contacts to scholars and postgraduates working in the field.

The editors welcome contributions relating to any aspect of the field of German-speaking exile in Great Britain, not limited to the refugees from Hitler in the mid-twentieth century. Articles should be sent on disk and in hard copy to the Hon. Secretary, Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies, Institute of Germanic and Romance Studies, Senate House, Malet Street, London WC1E 7HU. A style sheet is available from the Hon. Secretary.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.


German Monitor

(Formerly: GDR-Monitor)

German Monitor (founded in 1979) is a series for themed edited volumes on literature, culture and politics in the German-speaking world since 1945. Our approach is inclusive: some volumes focus on single authors, political figures or genres; other volumes explore themes such as narratives of trauma, German left-wing terrorism, local/global narratives, and cultural relations between Germany and Austria and neighbouring countries.


We welcome proposals for interdisciplinary volumes as well as those with a specifically literary, cultural or political focus. Many of our contributors are based in German Studies, others in disciplines such as Comparative Literature, Film Studies, Musicology, History, Museum Studies, and Political Science. We encourage volumes that push disciplinary boundaries, and those that consider the roles that Germany, Austria, and Switzerland play in Europe today.

The book series has a system of double peer-reviewing. We publish volumes in German or English.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.