Browse results

Series Editors: Jussi M. Hanhimäki and Marco Wyss

The overall aim of this book series is to offer new perspectives on the East-West conflict by building on recent and current historiographical developments in Cold War history. The series moves beyond traditional narratives by investigating the impact of both medium and lesser powers on the evolution of the Cold War. In addition to state actors, potential authors are also encouraged to focus on international organisations and non-state actors, such as national liberation movements, non-governmental organisations, and civil society groups. The geographical scope of the series is global and extends to all continents to cover also hitherto neglected (sub-)regions, notably in the so-called Third World. Methodologically, submissions should preferably be based on multi-archival historical research, and can draw on other related disciplines, such as (but not limited to) international relations and anthropology. While the editors privilege single-authored research monographs, they also welcome proposals for multi-authored volumes.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.
Series Editors: Damian Alan Pargas and Jeff Fynn-Paul

As a practice in which human beings were held captive for an indefinite period of time, coerced into extremely dependent and exploitative power relationships, denied rights (including rights over their labor, lives, and bodies), often vulnerable to forced relocation by various means, and forced to labor against their will, slavery in one form or another predates written records and has existed in innumerable societies. This exciting series provides a venue for scholarly work—research monographs and edited volumes—that advances our understanding of the history of slavery and post-slavery in any period and any geographical region. It fills an important gap in academic publishing and builds upon two relatively recent developments in historical scholarship. First, it provides a world-class outlet for the increased scholarly interest shown in slavery studies in recent years, not only for those working on modern Atlantic societies but also other regions and time periods throughout world history. Second, this series intersects slavery studies with a growing interest in global history among researchers, including global migrations and interactions, warfare, trade routes, and economic expansion. Studies in Global Slavery welcomes submissions that deal with themes such as the development of slave societies and societies with slaves; human trafficking and forced migration; slavery and globalization; slave culture and cultural transfer; political, economic, and ideological causes and effects of slavery; resistance; abolition and emancipation; and memories/legacies of slavery.

Monographs by specialists in the field are especially sought, but multi-authored edited volumes containing academic articles by slavery scholars will also be considered. Manuscripts should be written in English and be at least 80,000 words in length (including footnotes and bibliography). Manuscripts may also include illustrations, tables, maps, and other visual material.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by email to the publisher Jason Prevost. Please direct all other correspondence to Assistant Editor Debbie de Wit.
Maritime history is the history of mankind’s relation to the sea. The peer-reviewed Brill’s Studies in Maritime History welcomes studies on maritime history primarily international and comparative, with a global perspective. It regards maritime history as the history of the people who sail on the sea and live round the sea, that is, of littoral societies, of maritime regions, of seas and oceans, of the effects on land of man’s interaction with the sea. Maritime history is approached as widely as possible, as delineated by the important Dutch-Australian maritime historian Frank Broeze: it includes the use of the surface of the sea for transport and maritime business; the use of the resources of the sea and its subsoil; the use of the sea for power projection; the sea as an area for scientific exploration; the use of the sea for leisure activities; the use of the sea as an inspiration in culture and ideology. Maritime history offers the liberation of a borderless world in a synthesis of history and the social sciences, including economics, sociology, anthropology, linguistics and geography.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor Gelina Harlaftis or the publisher at BRILL, Wendel Scholma.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

This is a new series with an average of one volume per year.