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Edited by Frank Grunert, Knud Haakonssen and Diethelm Klippel

Natural law changed its character in the post-Reformation period, mainly because it became an academic discipline. This institutionalisation happened first in Protestant countries but increasingly also in Catholic areas. In the hands of philosophers and jurists rather than theologians the subject served a wide variety of purposes in domestic, colonial, imperial and international politics, in judicial administration, legislation and reform, in social analysis and in the inculcation of social ethics. Although concerned with the foundations of morality, law and politics, early modern natural law was far from a coherent philosophical theory, but rather the framework for fundamental disputes. What kind of natural law was adopted in a given place and period was often a matter of local controversy in state, church and university. At the same time, natural law was characterised by extensive transnational networks.

Edited by Larissa Tracy

A peer-reviewed book series that provides a forum for investigations of aspects of the medieval world from a textual and cultural perspective, using an interdisciplinary approach. This series examines a varied range of social and cultural issues like language, identity, monstrosity, gender, race, religion, injustice, medical treatment, death, and grief through the whole medieval period, ca. 600–1500, including early modern and modern medievalisms and responses to the Middle Ages. Innovative and interesting cultural and intertextual studies from all geographical regions of the medieval world are welcome. The series will contain monographs, edited volumes, and critical editions and other works of reference.

This is a new series with an average of one volume per year.
Studies in the History of International Law is a peer-reviewed book series that publishes books on the history of international law in the broadest possible sense, without any restrictions in terms of geography or chronology. The series includes studies on the law governing relations between independent body politics, from whatever denomination or civilization. It does not reduce the field to the study of the antecedents, the emergence and evolution of international law as it was formed from the Late Middle Ages onwards in Western Europe.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to either the series editor Randall Lesaffer or the publisher at BRILL, Wendel Scholma.
Legal History Library is a peer-reviewed book series on the history of law. The series includes the subseries Studies in the History of International Law and Studies in the History of Private Law. Both subseries have independent editorial teams.

Studies in the History of International Law publishes books on the history of international law in the broadest possible sense, without any restrictions in terms of geography or chronology. The series includes studies on the law governing relations between independent body politics, from whatever denomination or civilization. It does not reduce the field to the study of the antecedents, the emergence and evolution of international law as it was formed from the Late Middle Ages onwards in Western Europe. Studies in the History of International Law is edited by Randall Lesaffer. More information can be found on the series website.

Studies in the History of Private Law is a book series on the history of private law in the broadest sense. It focuses on the history of the two major families of private law in the world, European and Anglo-American private law. The history of civil procedure is expressly included in the series. There is no restriction in terms of chronology or geography as long as the particular object studied finds its origin in these two families. Studies in the History of Private Law is edited by Remco van Rhee, Dirk Heirbaut and Matthew C. Mirow. More information can be found on the series website.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the series editors or the publisher at BRILL, Wendel Scholma.

Brill Open offers you the choice to make your research freely accessible online in exchange for a Publication Charge. This can be by choice or to comply with funding mandates or university requirements. Brill offers various options of Open Access; for more information please go to the Brill Open webpage.

The series published an average of 2,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.
Studies in the History of Private Law is a peer-reviewed book series on the history of private law in the broadest sense. It focuses on the history of the two major families of private law in the world, European and Anglo-American private law. The history of civil procedure is expressly included in the series. There is no restriction in terms of chronology or geography as long as the particular object studied finds its origin in these two families. The approach is preferably comparative in nature, both vertically and horizontally, although studies that approach the subject matter from a different perspective are not automatically excluded. The aim of the series is to study the historical development of particular areas and topics of private law and to explain existing differences and similarities between and within the two major families from a historical perspective. An additional aim is to contribute to a mutual understanding of different approaches to similar problems within the various legal systems. The series also studies the growing need for a ius commune in today’s globalising world and provides the necessary historical information for those working in the field of harmonisation projects. The series not only incorporates dogmatical studies, but also offers a forum for interdisciplinary studies that do not only concentrate on private law and legal history but which, nevertheless, have private law and legal history as their main theme. In addition, it welcomes studies that study private law in relationship to other fields of law, for example constitutional law.

The Studies in the History of Private Law is published as a subseries of Legal History Library .

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher, Wendel Scholma, at BRILL, P.O. Box 9000, 2300 PA Leiden, The Netherlands.

Edited by John Hudson

This series looks at the literature (Latin and vernacular, church and secular) of law, as well as legal practice and its context in Europe from Justinian in the 6th century down to the 1560s. It provides a forum for interdisciplinary scholarly work – original monographs, article collections, editions of primary sources, translations – in the fields of the history of law, historical anthropology, social/cultural history, material culture (sumptuary laws), political and economic history, church history, dispute theory and history of rhetoric, aiming to build a bridge between the history of law and other fields in medieval studies. It will accept studies on Roman and canon law, English common law, Continental customary law, and Jewish and Islamic law.

*For Brill's peer review process see here.

For Brill's Open Access options click here

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years.

Edited by Alexander Hollerbach, Hans Maier and Paul Mikat

Leidse Juridische Reeks

(Discontinued series)