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Edited by Roberta D'Alessandro

Romance languages have come to play a central role within general linguistics over the last years. Many minor varieties have attracted the interest of scholars, and this has led to the proliferation of articles and books on Romance. While the understanding of various phenomena in the Romance languages has seen many advances, the documentation side has slowed down significantly. Minor Romance languages are less and less documented, both because of a lack of funds and because they are steadily being replaced by standard languages. Those linguists that still dedicate time and effort towards documenting and describing non-standard Romance varieties are often unable to find a venue to publish their work.

A series on the grammars of Romance languages has been long a desideratum among the linguistic community. The Romance subseries of the Brill Grammars and Sketches of the World’s Languages series finally offers a proper venue for such valuable studies, which will appeal to Romance scholars and students working on Romance, as well as linguists keen to discover information about the numerous Romance varieties that are spoken todays in Europe and the Americas.

The series features books on synchronic and diachronic grammars, the phonology, morphology, and syntax of one or more Romance languages. While these grammars can be theoretically informed, this series does not feature specific theoretical analyses of language phenomena, but aims to be accessible to a broad audience. Theoretical tools are thus welcome, but do not constitute the main aim of the series.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editor will work with authors to ensure high standards. For information on book proposals and publishing with Brill, please see the Resources for Authors pages.

Edited by Gerrit Dimmendaal

This section of Grammars and Sketches of the World's Languages deals specifically with the languages of Africa. The aim of the series is to improve the documentation of hitherto poorly described or undescribed African languages by publishing comprehensive, high-quality grammars. Ideally, these latter will include a basic lexicon and appendix of glossed texts. In addition, grammars or sketches of hitherto undescribed dialects of better-known languages are welcomed. We encourage a unifying typological approach, so that these volumes are accessible and intelligible to the wider linguistic readership. Special preference will be given to descriptions of typologically or genetically interesting languages and studies resulting from language documentation projects. Authors are expected to follow Leipzig glossing rules and IPA conventions. The editor may specify the TOC structure and the list of abbreviations; these will be discussed with authors at the book proposal stage.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editor will work with authors to ensure high standards. For information on book proposals and publishing with Brill, please see the Resources for Authors pages.
This peer-reviewed series publishes descriptions of the world's understudied languages, either as full-fledged grammars or as language sketches. The GSWL is an umbrella series currently consisting of the sub-categories for grammars and sketches on Mainland and Insular South East Asia (Series Editor Paul Sidwell and Mathias Jenny), Romance Languages (Edited by Roberta D’Alessandro), African languages (Edited by Gerrit J. Dimmendaal), Indigenours Languages of Russia (Edited by Beáta Wagner-Nagy and Valentin Gusev), and Papuan Languages (Edited by Antoinette Schapper and Lila San Roque).

The series has published an average of one volume per year since 2014.

Edited by Paul Sidwell and Mathias Jenny

This section of Grammars and Sketches of the World's Languages deals specifically with the languages of mainland and insular South East Asia, including but not limited to Austroasiatic, Hmong-Mien, Tai-Kadai, Tibeto-Burman, Austronesian and Andamanese.
This section of Grammars and Sketches of the World's Languages deals specifically with the languages of mainland and insular South East Asia, and is open to all language families of the area: Austroasiatic, Hmong-Mien, Tai-Kadai, Tibeto-Burman, Austronesian and Andamanese. Contributions can come from a range of sources, including: dissertations, field notes, and reworkings of extant studies. Ideally they will include a basic lexicon and appendix of glossed texts. For print volumes we prefer at least 200 printed book pages, these can include multiple short sketches forming coherent volumes. Shorter works as stand-alone publications can be presented as e-editions. Media files (images, audio, video) can be included in e-editions or as links in print volumes (subject to copyright considerations).

We encourage a unifying typological approach, so that these volumes are both accessible to typologists coming from different theoretical backgrounds and intelligible to the wider linguistic readership. Authors are expected to follow Leipzig glossing rules and IPA conventions. The editors may specify the TOC structure and the list of abbreviations; these will be discussed with authors at the book proposal stage.

This is a peer-reviewed series; the editors will work with authors to ensure high standards. We seek to build a diverse and highly qualified Advisory Board; interested scholars should contact the editors. For information on book proposals and publishing with Brill, please see the Resources for Authors pages.
Brill’s Studies in Language, Cognition and Culture (BSLC) is a peer-reviewed book series that offers an international forum for high-quality original studies in languages and cultures. It focuses on the interaction between linguistic categories (and their conceptualization), cultural values, and human cognition. Publications in this series will include interdisciplinary studies on language, its meanings and forms, and possible interactions with cognitive and communicational patterns. The series spans cultural and social anthropology, cognitive science and linguistics. The emphasis is on inductive based cross-linguistic and cross-cultural studies, with special attention to poorly known areas, such as Lowland Amazonia and the Pacific. The series is international in scope.
The field of linguistics thrives on empirical data, whether from languages, from psycholinguistic experiments, from sociolinguistic interviews, from typological surveys, or from historical investigations, to name just a few sources of data. At the same time, the field also thrives on theory, inasmuch as general theories of language structure, language use, language acquisition, and language change are essential to a full understanding of how the object of our investigations, natural human language, works. Theories provide a basis for testable claims about language, claims that can be tested and confirmed or disproved only by empirical considerations.

Empirical Approaches to Linguistic Theory (EALT) aims to publish high-quality works that are grounded in empirical data but at the same time advance theoretical goals. The relevant notion of 'theory' envisioned here is broad and eclectic, but also rigorous. The contributing empirical data is similarly broadly defined. The series includes single or co-authored monographs on a single topic or linguistic issue, state-of-the art reports and/or thematically coherent multi-authored volumes.

Prospective authors are invited to submit proposals for this series, to be vetted by the series editors, in which the particular theoretical constructs and/or claims to be examined are identified along with the empirical basis for the investigation.