Studies in Islamic Ethics is a double-blind peer-reviewed book series that covers all aspects of ethics in the Islamic world, both historical and contemporary. The series welcomes volumes in English, French, and Arabic.

Edited by Jamal J. Elias, Feras Q. Hamza, Walid Saleh and Roberto Tottoli

This Brill series is uniquely dedicated to publishing studies and editions of texts that explore a variety of Islamic writing as Islamic literature. The series considers the mechanics of Islamic literary styles as these have taken shape across major Islamic linguistic traditions, principally Arabic, Persian and Turkish, but also as they might extend to the religious writings of Islamic Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia, China and Iberian Peninsula. The exploration of such literary compositions through their form, style and content assumes that they share a conceptual framework, a religious sensibility and certain structures of thought that may be said to be distinctly Islamic. The scope of the series allows for an examination of the literary aspects of key texts such as the Qur’an as well as the literary dynamics of a variety of subgenres ranging from Quranic commentaries, to Stories of the Prophets, Hadith compilations, poetry, belles-lettres, mi‘raj accounts and a variety of Sufi works.



Biblia Arabica

Texts and Studies

The progressive spread of Arabic as the dominant spoken and written language in the lands conquered by Islam led the Jewish, Christian and Samaritan communities under its rule to translate their sacred scriptures: the Hebrew Bible, the Old and New Testaments and the Samaritan Pentateuch respectively, into Arabic from languages such as Hebrew, Greek, Syriac, Latin and Coptic. This resulted in a large number of partial and integral translations revealing a great variety in stylistic approaches, vocabulary, script, and dogmatic concerns. Many of the surviving manuscripts and fragments are nowadays kept in libraries all over the world and still await edition and closer study. This series addresses this lacuna in research by publishing critical (including synoptic) editions of Arabic versions of individual biblical books produced in the Middle Ages and beyond, as well as studies that examine the different schools and persons that took part in this scriptural translation enterprise, analyzing their aims and methodologies, as well as the social and cultural implications of their endeavor. In addition, the reception of and reactions to these Bible translations by Muslim authors fall within the scope of the series.