This series focuses on the manifold commercial, human, political-diplomatic and scientific interactions that took place across the continental (overland) and maritime Silk Routes. This includes exchanges of ideas, knowledge, religions, and the transfer of cultural traditions, including forms of migration. Geographically speaking the series covers networks (or routes) across the Eurasian continent, the broader Indian Ocean (from East Asia as far as Africa), and the Asia-Pacific world, that is, trans-Pacific connections from Asia to the American continent. A special interest lies in the history of science and technology and knowledge transfer along and across these routes. The series focuses particularly on historical topics but contemporary studies are also welcome.
The Journal of African Archaeology Monograph Series is a supplement to the Journal of African Archaeology. It offers a platform for more extensive contributions such as research monographs, refereed conference proceedings and other collections that do not fit the Journal’s scope.

Previous volumes (1-11) in the series can be ordered through:
Africa Magna Verlag
Altkönigblick 83
60437 Frankfurt/M
Germany
Tel.: +49 6101 9958120
Email info@africamagna.de
African History seeks to publish scholarly writing on the history of Africa. It welcomes submissions on the history of any part of the continent and its islands. Works could range from the earliest epochs through to the recent past. Particularly welcome are studies that bring to light new archival materials, offer new interpretations of established sources or arguments, and that are interdisciplinary in method but historically-grounded.

We are keen to have the publications in this series widely available on the African continent and therefore pursue co-publishing arrangements with local publishers.


Africa Yearbook

Politics, Economy and Society South of the Sahara

Edited by Andreas Mehler, Henning Melber and Klaas van Walraven

The Africa Yearbook has won the ASA 2012 Conover-Porter Book Award!

The Africa Yearbook covers major domestic political developments, the foreign policy and socio-economic trends in sub-Sahara Africa – all related to developments in one calendar year. The Yearbook contains articles on all sub-Saharan states, each of the four sub-regions (West, Central, Eastern, Southern Africa) focusing on major cross-border developments and sub-regional organizations as well as one article on continental developments and one on European-African relations. While the articles have thorough academic quality, the Yearbook is mainly oriented to the requirements of a large range of target groups: students, politicians, diplomats, administrators, journalists, teachers, practitioners in the field of development aid as well as business people.

With this Series, the African-Europe Group for Interdisciplinary Studies (AEGIS) provides a venue for the publication of works drawn from the lively and expanding community of scholars with interests in Africa and its Diaspora. The AEGIS Series aims to publish books within the broad fields of study within the humanities and social sciences that would bring new approaches or innovative perspectives to the topics discussed. Titles comprise works that could also reflect established debate within African Studies if they provide new insights. Both individually-authored works and edited collections on focused themes will be considered.

The Afrika-Studiecentrum Series aims to present the best of African studies in the field of social sciences in the Netherlands. Publication in the series is open to all Dutch africanists and also to African scholars who are affiliated to a Dutch academic institution. Publications can be either monographs or edited volumes, in various disciplines and across all African nations, either on a single country or comparing different countries.

The aim of Sources for African History is to establish a series of critical editions of narrative sources of non-African origin for the history of sub-Saharan Africa, accessible to scholars and students in Africa and elsewhere. Sources for African History complements the African Sources for African History series in that it provides worthwhile views of non-Africans and non-African institutions on the history of Africa.
African Dynamics is an annual publication of the Africa Studies Centre, Leiden, the Netherlands. Every year, a different theme is discussed from various perspectives by scholars from all over the world.
The Africa Studies Centre was founded in 1948, making it one of the oldest African Studies Centres in the world. Its main objectives are:
- to promote and undertake scientific research on Sub-Saharan Africa, particularly in the field of the social sciences and humanities.
- to function as a national centre in the field of African studies and to contribute to the education and teaching in these sciences; and to promote the dissemination of knowledge and an understanding of African societies in the wider public sphere.

Edited by Dmitri van den Bersselaar, Michel Doortmont and Jan Jansen

The aim of African Sources for African History is to establish a series of critical editions of indigenous African narrative sources for the history of sub-Saharan Africa, accessible to scholars and students in Africa and elsewhere. African Sources for African History intends to give African viewpoints a more central place in the writing of African history, by making African perspectives more easily available. Its stress on indigenous African sources is also hoped to inspire individual researchers to search actively for African sources and to make these available to the wider academic community.

In this series Brill publishes monographs that illuminate issues of social change, broadly understood, in Africa south of the Sahara. Coherently edited volumes may also be considered. Brill invites original, empirical, work that makes an essential conceptual contribution to its field, and has a particular interest in work by younger scholars. Brill welcomes proposals from every branch of the social sciences and humanities that also appeal to a non-specialist audience. Studies of source materials for African history, African linguistics, and religion in Africa each have their own series and will not be included in this series. Wherever appropriate, authors are invited to suggest African publishers with whom their work might be published in partnership with Brill.