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The series Nature, Culture and Literature is dedicated to publications approaching literature and other forms of text-based communication from an ecological standpoint. It provides a platform for the practice of ecocriticism in the broadest sense, understood as an issue-driven field of cultural enquiry comprising critical textual analysis and theorising on human/nature relations.
The series publishes single-author monographs and thematically focused collections of essays, on literature across languages, cultures and periods, and on other forms of writing. It is open to scholars working in green media studies, environmental history, philosophy, social and cultural theory, and linguistics, as well as national literatures and comparative literature.
Nature, Culture and Literature embraces a range of different approaches, and explores phenomena observable in Europe, America and beyond in their international extension as well as in their national and regional peculiarities.
Individual volumes focus on a specific area of research. They may examine the work of a single author or the characteristics of the environmental imagination in a particular culture; they may map one of the themes central to popular understandings of nature and explore their creative reconfiguration (e.g. nature and national/regional identity, human/ animal relations, or climate change); or they may develop and illustrate a particular theoretical approach (for instance in ecolinguistics, energy humanities, or econarratology / ecopoetics).

The series aims to publish an average two volumes per year. All volumes are peer reviewed.
Amsterdam Studies on Cultural Identity
Imagology, the study of cross-national perceptions and images as expressed in literary discourse, has for many decades been one of the more challenging and promising branches of Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies.
Its focus lies in the attitudes, stereotypes and prejudices about our own and others' national characters; attitudes which govern our rhetoric, discursive representation, literary activity and - ultimately - international relations at large. To recognize "national characters" as textual (frequently literary) constructs necessitates a textual and historical analysis of their typology, their discursive expression and dissemination, by historians and literary scholars.
The series Studia Imagologica, which will accommodate scholarly monographs and collected volumes in English, French or German provides a forum for this literary-historical specialism.
Before their inclusion in Studia Imagologica volumes and monographs will be subjected to peer-review.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.