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Edited by Michael Y. Bennett

New Perspectives in Edward Albee Studies is an annual peer-reviewed book series meant to provide an outlet for scholarship and criticism on, or related to, Edward Albee and his works. Volumes feature original, academic essays and review-essays centered around a special topic. Each volume is edited by a Guest Editor. The series welcomes and encourages different critical and theoretical scholarly approaches to Albee studies. In keeping with Albee’s own view that drama is literature, New Perspectives in Edward Albee Studies is also very interested in essays that examine Albee’s plays as dramatic literature.
The Neo-Victorian Series aims to analyse the complex revival, re-vision and recycling of the long nineteenth century in the cultural imaginary. This contemporary phenomenon will be examined in its diverse British and worldwide, postcolonial and neo-colonial contexts, as well as its manifold forms, including literature, the arts, film, television, and virtual media. To assess such simultaneous artistic regeneration and retrogressive innovation and to tackle the ethical debate and ideological consequences of these re-appropriations will constitute the main challenges of this series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Edited by Allan H. Simmons, John G. Peters and Gene M. Moore

Published in cooperation with The Joseph Conrad Society (UK), this new series of Conrad monographs Conrad Studies intends to make available rare or out-of-print items of Conradiana, collections of documentary and other historical materials as well as criticism that has achieved classic status. The editors welcome proposals for volumes in the series.

Authors can also submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


The series published three volumes over the last 5 years.

Edited by Jesús Benito Sánchez and Ana María Manzanas

The series locates itself within the field of comparative American studies, and focuses specifically on the analysis and criticism of the so-called “ethnic” American literatures. The orientation of the series is, explicitly, for the literary analysis to merge the political with the imaginative, and the culturally-specific with the cross-cultural. As an intercultural endeavor, the series assumes the inextricable link between standards of aesthetic value and power; aesthetic judgments are not made in an vacuum but are rather intimately connected with dominant cultural standards of value. In this sense, intercultural literary analysis should address issues of race, ethnicity, class and gender, while it focuses on literary topics, therefore occupying the interspace between the political and the aesthetic.

By ethnic American literature is understood the multiethnic literatures of the United States, with an emphasis on the comparative analysis of the different traditions (including African American literature, Asian American literature, Native American lit., Chicano and US latino literature, as well as other so called hyphenated or immigrant writers with non-US background like Indian writers, Arab American writers, European American writers, etc.). The series focus is mostly comparative, multiethnic, and intercultural, but would also love to feature analyses of single ethnic traditions.

The volumes in the series offer clear and comprehensive approaches to selected topics (such as magical realism, border theory, and others), covering the different implications of each topic to the development of ethnic American literatures. Volumes then proceed to comparative literary analyses of carefully selected works from each ethnic tradition.

Volumes should offer interrelated contributions. Each volume should consist of long articles, carefully designed to cover the whole field under study. Each article should offer a general, theoretical exploration of a particular topic, as well as argue a particular point.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Dialogue

Critical Works on Literary Texts after 1900

Edited by Henry Veggian


The goal of the Dialogue Series is to expand the range of critical debate devoted to literary authors, works and forms. To that end, Dialogue publishes new and recent criticism on literary writing that has elicited or is eliciting critical debate. In addition, Dialogue devotes occasional volumes to neglected works deemed worthy of renewed critical attention.
The Dialogue Series is devoted primarily to literary works written in English (or translated into English) after 1900. Engaging a variety of modes within that range, it includes the novel/romance, short fiction, poetry, drama and literary non-fiction (such as literary biography) as well as occasional volumes on emergent genres such as the graphic novel.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.

Spatial Practices

An Interdisciplinary Series in Cultural History, Geography and Literature

Spatial Practices aims to publish new work in the study of spaces and places which have been appropriated for cultural meanings: symbolic landscapes and urban places which have specific cultural meanings that construct, maintain, and circulate myths of a unified national or regional culture and their histories, or whose visible ironies deconstruct those myths. Taking up the lessons of the new cultural geography, papers are invited which attempt to build bridges between the disciplines of cultural history, literary and cultural studies, and geography.
Spatial Practices will promote a new interdisciplinary kind of cultural history drawing on constructivist approaches to questions of culture and identity that insist that cultural “realities” are the effect of discourses; but also that cultural objects and their histories and geographies are read as texts, with formal and generic rules, tropes and topographies.
Before their inclusion in Spatial Practices manuscripts will be subjected to peer-review.

The series published an average of two volumes per year over the last 5 years

Edited by C.C. Barfoot

DQR Studies in Literature is a longstanding book series for state-of-the-art research in the field of English-language literature(s). Besides the more classical research in English, American and Irish literature, do we offer a platform for new directions in literary studies in relation to translation studies, minority literatures, ecology, medical humanities, hemispheric studies, transatlantic studies, network studies and social sciences, as well as reflections on studies in English literature as a discipline.

All submissions are subject to a double blind peer review process prior to publication.

DQR Studies in Literature is a book series which first began in 1986 as an offshoot of the journal, Dutch Quarterly Review of Anglo-American Letters that flourished from 1971 until 1992.
Since its inception we publish only collected volumes in this series.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


The series published an average of three volumes per year over the last 5 years.
The Scottish Cultural Review of Language and Literature publishes new work in Scottish Studies, with a focus on analysis and reinterpretation of the literature and languages of Scotland, and the cultural contexts that have shaped them.

Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts to the publisher at BRILL, Masja Horn.


The series published an average of 1,5 volumes per year over the last 5 years.

The controversial British writer Ford Madox Ford (1873-1939) is increasingly recognized as a major presence in early twentieth-century literature.
He is best-known for his fiction, especially The Good Soldier, long considered a modernist masterpiece; and Parade’s End, which Anthony Burgess described as ‘the finest novel about the First World War’; and Samuel Hynes has called ‘the greatest war novel ever written by an Englishman’.
The book series, International Ford Madox Ford Studies, has been founded to reflect the recent resurgence of interest in Ford’s life and work. Each volume will normally be based upon a particular theme or issue. Each will relate aspects of Ford’s work, life, and contacts, to broader concerns of his time.

The series is published in association with the Ford Madox Ford Society.
For information about the Ford Madox Ford Society, please see the website at:
www.open.ac.uk/Arts/fordmadoxford-society

or contact:
max.saunders@kcl.ac.uk
or
Dr Sara Haslam s.j.haslam@open.ac.uk
Department of Literature, Open University,
Walton Hall, Milton Keynes, MK7 6AA, UK

Guidelines for contributors to IFMFS, including a full list of abbreviations of Ford's titles and related works, can be found on the website.

The series published an average of one volume per year over the last 5 years.