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The Language of Education

Key Terms and Concepts in Teaching and Learning

The Language of Education: Key Terms and Concepts in Teaching and Learning is a series of short handbooks each of which focuses on the special language inherent in a variety of educational disciplines. Those entering graduate programs, scholars from non-English speaking areas, teachers with interests in accessing the academic literature, and even those wishing to explore outside their discipline should find something of interest in these books. In short, these books support shared understanding by assisting all of those working with a particular discipline to share a common vocabulary and foster effective communication.

The featured terms in each volume have been selected for their relevance and their potential to be defined uniquely in a particular educational field. The key terms are discussed on one page with a short introductory definition for quick reference followed by a longer expanded discussion supported by references. The index in each book includes links to encourage readers to explore related terms and concepts and thus gain additional information and context. Those who are new to the academic language of a particular educational area, may find it useful to read the books in this series as if each were a collection of very short stories introducing that discipline.
Critical Leaders and the Foundation of Disability Studies in Education aims to formalize the significance of early histories of understanding disability drawn from the scholarship of those who turned away from conventional status quo and pathologized constructs commonly accepted worldwide to explain disability in schools and society. The series begins with recognition of North American scholars including: Ellen Brantlinger, Lous Heshusius, Steve Taylor, Doug Biklen, and Thomas M. Skrtic. We will expand the series to include scholars from several international countries who likewise formed analyses that shaped the terrain for the emergence of critical perspectives that have endured and slowly given rise to the interdisciplinary field of Disability Studies in Education.
The Global Education in the 21st Century series will address contemporary cutting-edge teaching, learning and research issues from a global perspective. The series will present a modern focus on the debates surrounding current and significant educational issues, as well as the technological advances that impact on contemporary educational practices during a period of rapid social and technological changes.
Current educational reform rhetoric around the globe repeatedly invokes the language of 21st century learning and innovative thinking while contrarily re-enforcing, through government policy, high stakes testing and international competition, standardization of education that is exceedingly reminiscent of 19th century Taylorism and scientific management. Yet, as the steam engines of educational “progress” continue down an increasingly narrow, linear, and unified track, it is becoming increasingly apparent that the students in our classrooms are inheriting real world problems of economic instability, ecological damage, social inequality, and human suffering. If young people are to address these social problems, they will need to activate complex, interconnected, empathetic and multiple ways of thinking about the ways in which peoples of the world are interconnected as a global community in the living ecosystem of the world. Seeing the world as simultaneously local, global, political, economic, ecological, cultural and interconnected is far removed from the Enlightenment’s objectivist and mechanistic legacy that presently saturates the status quo of contemporary schooling. If we are to derail this positivist educational train and teach our students to see and be in the world differently, the educational community needs a serious dose of imagination. The goal of this book series is to assist students, practitioners, leaders, and researchers in looking beyond what they take for granted, questioning the normal, and amplifying our multiplicities of knowing, seeing, being and feeling to, ultimately, envision and create possibilities for positive social and educational change. The books featured in this series will explore ways of seeing, knowing, being, and learning that are frequently excluded in this global climate of standardized practices in the field of education. In particular, they will illuminate the ways in which imagination permeates every aspect of life and helps develop personal and political awareness. Featured works will be written in forms that range from academic to artistic, including original research in traditional scholarly format that addresses unconventional topics (e.g., play, gaming, ecopedagogy, aesthetics), as well as works that approach traditional and unconventional topics in unconventional formats (e.g., graphic novels, fiction, narrative forms, and multi-genre texts). Inspired by the work of Maxine Greene, this series will showcase works that “break through the limits of the conventional” and provoke readers to continue arousing themselves and their students to “begin again” (Greene, 1995, p. 109).
This series examines research, theory and practice in the context of university education, professional practice, work and society. Rather than focussing on a single topic the series examines areas where two or more of these arenas come together. Themes that will be explored in the series include: university education of professions, society expectations of professional practice, professional practice workplaces and strategies for investigating each of these areas. There are many challenges facing researchers, educators, practitioners and students in today’s practice worlds. The authors in this series bring a wealth of practice wisdom and experience to examine these issues, share their practice knowledge, report research into strategies that address these challenges, share approaches to working and learning and raise yet more questions.
The conversations conducted in the series will contribute to expanding the discourse around the way people encounter and experience practice, education, work and society.
The Pedagogy, Education and Praxis series will foster a conversation of traditions in which different European and Anglo-American perspectives on ‘pedagogy’, ‘education’ and ‘praxis’ are problematised and explored. By opening constructive dialogue between different theoretical and intellectual traditions, the Series aims, in part, at recovering and extending the resources of these distinctive traditions for education in contemporary times. The Series aims to contribute to (1) theoretical developments in the fields of pedagogy, education and praxis; (2) the development of praxis in the pedagogical professions; and (3) the development of strategies capable of resisting and counteracting contemporary tendencies towards the technologisation, standardisation, bureaucratisation, commodification and demoralisation of education.