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This book series focuses on the historical foundations and current transformations of African higher education. It is aimed at scholars, students, academic leaders, policy makers and key stakeholders both in Africa and around the world, who have a strong interest in the progress, challenges and opportunities facing African higher education.
A diversity of higher education themes and issues related to African higher education at institutional, national, regional and international levels are addressed. These include, but are not limited to, new developments and perspectives related to knowledge production and dissemination; the teaching/learning process; all forms of academic mobility – student, scholar, staff, program, provider and policy; funding mechanisms; pan-Africa regionalization; alternate models of higher education provision; university leadership, governance and management; gender issues; use of new technologies; equitable access; student success; Africanization of the curriculum- to name only a few critical issues.
A diversity of approaches to scholarship is welcomed including theoretical, conceptual, applied, policy orientations. The notions of internationalization and harmonization of African higher education complements the cosmopolitan outlook of the series project through its comparative approach as critical imperatives. Finally, the book series is intended to attract both authors and readers, internal and external to Africa, all of whom are focused on African higher education including those doing comparative work on Africa with other regions of the world and the global South in particular.
This series explores the current volatile context of higher education and examines ways that the higher education sector is responding to and driving these changes. The books in this series tackle challenges facing the sector and question the goals and strategies that researchers, educators and theorists are creating to address these challenges. They explore trends in stakeholder expectations, and evolving pedagogies and different horizons existing and emerging in higher education. The authors in this series bring a wealth of academic practice wisdom and experience to examine these issues. They share their practice knowledge, report research into strategies that address these challenges, and raise yet more questions. Through the conversations in this book readers can enter into the debates, visions and experiences of the agents of higher education.
The knowledge, learning and creative economies manifest the changing significance of intellectual capital and the thickening connections between economic growth, knowledge and creativity. Increasingly economic and social activity is comprised by the ‘symbolic’ or ‘weightless’ economy with its iconic, immaterial and digital goods. This new digital knowledge economy includes new international labor that rely on developments in information and communication technologies (ICTs) that are changing the format, density and nature of the exchange and flows of knowledge, research and scholarship. Delivery modes in education are being reshaped. New global cultures of knowledge and research networks are spreading rapidly. New forms of openness and networking, cross-border people movement, flows of capital, portal cities and intensive development zones all are changing the conditions of imagining and producing and the sharing of creative work in different spheres. At the centre of is the economy/creativity nexus. But are education systems, institutions, assumptions and habits positioned and able so as to seize the opportunities and meet the challenges? This new series investigates all the aspects of education in (and as) the creative economy in order to extend the dialogue about the relationship between contemporary higher education and the changing face of contemporary economies.
This series provides overviews about state of the art research in the field of higher education studies. It documents a selection of papers from the annual conferences of the Consortium of Higher Education Researchers (CHER), the world organisation of researchers in the field of higher education. This object and problem related field of studies is by nature interdisciplinary and theoretically as well as methodologically informed by disciplines such as sociology, political science, economics, history, philosophy, law and education. Each book includes an introduction by the editors explaining the thematic approach and criteria for selection as well as how the book can be used by its possible audience which might include graduate students, policy makers, researchers in the field, and practitioners in higher education administration, leadership and management.

Please email queries to Pedro Teixeira: pedrotx@fep.up.pt
Works in this Series will explore the complicated and shifting landscapes of wealth, opportunity, social class, and education in the changing global economic landscape, particularly at the intersections of race, ethnicity, religion, and gender. The Series includes work on education and social mobility within three major themes:
• Interrogation of stories of educational “success” against the odds for what these cases might teach about social class itself, about the depths of economic and educational constraints that have been surmounted, about the costs of those journeys, or about the long-term social and economic trajectories of class border crossers.
• Examination of the psycho-social processes by which people traverse class borders, including the social construction of ambition and achievement in young people marginalized from the academic mainstream by class, race, or gender. Works in the series will illuminate the complicated and contested processes of identity formation among those who attain upward mobility via success in school.
• Explorations of economic mobility within developing countries. New labor markets created by global consumerism are intensifying demand for formal education while also transforming individual lives, families, communities, and cultural practices. Meanwhile, high rates of migration in search of economic opportunity fuel debate about citizenship, assimilation, and identity as antecedents of economic mobility. How is formal education implicated in these processes?

Works are sought from the fields of sociology, anthropology, educational policy, economics, and political science. Methodologies may include longitudinal studies.
Higher education worldwide is in a period of transition, affected by globalization, the advent of mass access, changing relationships between the university and the state, and the new technologies, among others. Global Perspectives on Higher Education provides cogent analysis and comparative perspectives on these and other central issues affecting postsecondary education worldwide.

This series is co-published with the Center for International Higher Education at Boston College.