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Arts, Creativities, and Learning Environments in Global Perspectives aims at investigating the encounters that can occur between the arts and creativities in various learning environments and cultural contexts. The series intends to explore the multiplicity of these approaches by presenting perspectives from diverse learning environments, not solely formal institutions like schools, universities, academies, and colleges, but also non-formal ones (cultural institutions, libraries, museums, theatres, orchestras, archives, organisations, and work-places) or informal ones (play and games, community projects, amateur art, and clubs). This means that a pluralistic view on the artS – indeed, plural – is being embraced by including artistic expressions from all genres and artistic encounters at all levels, including the arts-based, artist-led, arts-inspired, arts-integrated. We encourage contributions from all over the world, in order to challenge a well-established Western-centred understanding of creativity and art (singular). This series will strongly support global perspectives, cross-cultural studies, critical theories, creative dissemination and a broader re-framing of the role of the arts for learning and for society.

Revolutionizing Urban Education

Hip Hop, Pedagogy, and Communities

This series consists of books written for all stakeholders in education including undergraduate and graduate students of education, teachers, parents, and the community at large. The volumes bridge research, theory, personal anecdotes and practice, and interrogates and provides recommendations for schools and communities, specifically in urban spaces. Books in this series focus on utilizing hip-hop as education to transform urban education and schools, and to introduce critical pedagogical ways to engage communities, and schools. Educators, students, community members, and academics are given opportunities to understand the essential nature of voice and activism. This work is necessary to transform schools and communities to better represent the young people they were built to serve.
The Personal/Public Scholarship book series values: (1) public scholarship (scholarship that is accessible to academic and popular audiences), and (2) interconnections between the personal and public in all areas of cultural, social, economic and political life. We publish textbooks, monographs and anthologies (original material only).

Please consult www.patricialeavy.com for submission requirements (click the book series tab).
Over the past decades China has experienced unprecedented economic liberalization, industrialization, mass migration, urbanization, and privatization, which have contributed to the rise of China as an emerging economic superpower. At the same time, China is also facing unprecedented challenges, including rising unemployment, socio-economic disparity, corruption, and environment degradation. Spotlight on China aims to bring together international scholars with contributions from new and established scholars to explore the profound social and economic transformation that has resulted from the market economy and its concomitant impact on education and society in China. The series includes authored and edited collections offering multidisciplinary perspectives and most contemporary and comprehensive analyses of recent social and educational changes in China.

Please send book proposals to the series editors, Shibao Guo and Yan Guo, or assistant editor Evelien van der Veer.
Informed by an anti-colonial spirit of resistance to injustices, this book series examines the ways and the degree to which the legacy of colonialism continues to influence the content of school curriculum, shape teachers’ teaching practices, and impact the outcome of the academic success of students, including students of color. Further, books published in this series illuminate the manner in which the legacy of colonialism remains one of the root causes of educational and socio-economic inequalities. This series also analyzes the ways and the extent to which such legacy has been responsible for many forms of classism that are race- and language-based. By so doing, this series illuminates the manner in which race intersects with class and language affecting the psychological, educational, cultural, and socio-economic conditions of historically and racially disenfranchised communities. All in all, this series highlights the ways and the degree to which the legacy of colonialism along with race-language-class- and gender-based discrimination continue to affect the existence of people, particularly people of color.
CALL FOR BOOK PROPOSALS
We are looking for books that deal with centrally race and/or ethnicity and are intended to be used in college classes. Monographs, short text books and edited volumes will be considered (original material only). Books should be of significant value to the teaching of race and/or ethnicity.

The series aims to promote social justice perspectives—all topics, disciplinary perspectives, methods and writing styles will be considered. Please note all authors will be expected to comply with the Sense style guidelines. We expect book to be approximately 200 printed pages with an estimated 500 words per page when tabulated using Sense’s style guidelines.
International authors are encouraged to submit proposals (we can publish in the English language only). Sense’s proposal form can be found at www.sensepublishers.com. Proposals should include: title (with subtitle if applicable), summary of the book, table of contents, the market for the book (what level, disciplines and courses the book can be used in) and a realistic delivery date and should be accompanied by a CV for each author. If the book will have pedagogical features please note that as well.

Please send queries or full proposals to Series Editor, Dr. Patricia Leavy at pleavy7@aol.com.


The Teaching Race and Ethnicity series publishes monographs, anthologies and reference books that deal centrally with race and/or ethnicity. The books are intended to be used in undergraduate and graduate classes across the disciplines. The series aims to promote social justice with an emphasis on multicultural, indigenous, intersectionality and critical race perspectives.
Cultural studies provides an analytical toolbox for both making sense of educational practice and extending the insights of educational professionals into their labors. In this context Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education provides a collection of books in the domain that specify this assertion. Crafted for an audience of teachers, teacher educators, scholars and students of cultural studies and others interested in cultural studies and pedagogy, the series documents both the possibilities of and the controversies surrounding the intersection of cultural studies and education. The editors and the authors of this series do not assume that the interaction of cultural studies and education devalues other types of knowledge and analytical forms. Rather the intersection of these knowledge disciplines offers a rejuvenating, optimistic, and positive perspective on education and educational institutions. Some might describe its contribution as democratic, emancipatory, and transformative. The editors and authors maintain that cultural studies helps free educators from sterile, monolithic analyses that have for too long undermined efforts to think of educational practices by providing other words, new languages, and fresh metaphors. Operating in an interdisciplinary cosmos, Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education is dedicated to exploring the ways cultural studies enhances the study and practice of education. With this in mind the series focuses in a non-exclusive way on popular culture as well as other dimensions of cultural studies including social theory, social justice and positionality, cultural dimensions of technological innovation, new media and media literacy, new forms of oppression emerging in an electronic hyperreality, and postcolonial global concerns. With these concerns in mind cultural studies scholars often argue that the realm of popular culture is the most powerful educational force in contemporary culture. Indeed, in the twenty-first century this pedagogical dynamic is sweeping through the entire world. Educators, they believe, must understand these emerging realities in order to gain an important voice in the pedagogical conversation.
Without an understanding of cultural pedagogy's (education that takes place outside of formal schooling) role in the shaping of individual identity—youth identity in particular—the role educators play in the lives of their students will continue to fade. Why do so many of our students feel that life is incomprehensible and devoid of meaning? What does it mean, teachers wonder, when young people are unable to describe their moods, their affective affiliation to the society around them. Meanings provided young people by mainstream institutions often do little to help them deal with their affective complexity, their difficulty negotiating the rift between meaning and affect. School knowledge and educational expectations seem as anachronistic as a ditto machine, not that learning ways of rational thought and making sense of the world are unimportant.
But school knowledge and educational expectations often have little to offer students about making sense of the way they feel, the way their affective lives are shaped. In no way do we argue that analysis of the production of youth in an electronic mediated world demands some "touchy-feely" educational superficiality. What is needed in this context is a rigorous analysis of the interrelationship between pedagogy, popular culture, meaning making, and youth subjectivity. In an era marked by youth depression, violence, and suicide such insights become extremely important, even life saving. Pessimism about the future is the common sense of many contemporary youth with its concomitant feeling that no one can make a difference.
If affective production can be shaped to reflect these perspectives, then it can be reshaped to lay the groundwork for optimism, passionate commitment, and transformative educational and political activity. In these ways cultural studies adds a dimension to the work of education unfilled by any other sub-discipline. This is what Transgressions: Cultural Studies and Education seeks to produce—literature on these issues that makes a difference. It seeks to publish studies that help those who work with young people, those individuals involved in the disciplines that study children and youth, and young people themselves improve their lives in these bizarre times.

This book series is dedicated to the radical love and actions of Paulo Freire, Jesus “Pato” Gomez, and Joe L. Kincheloe.