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Critical Leaders and the Foundation of Disability Studies in Education aims to formalize the significance of early histories of understanding disability drawn from the scholarship of those who turned away from conventional status quo and pathologized constructs commonly accepted worldwide to explain disability in schools and society. The series begins with recognition of North American scholars including: Ellen Brantlinger, Lous Heshusius, Steve Taylor, Doug Biklen, and Thomas M. Skrtic. We will expand the series to include scholars from several international countries who likewise formed analyses that shaped the terrain for the emergence of critical perspectives that have endured and slowly given rise to the interdisciplinary field of Disability Studies in Education.
Critical storytellers provoke readers to acknowledge and question different perspectives. Critical storytelling questions unquestioned norms and assumptions. It exposes oppression in its various forms, such as violence, sexism, racism, bullying, exploitation, marginalization, dehumanization, and cultural imperialism. These passionate narrators have the guts to think, act, and question, vulnerably. Storytelling, when it's critical, is inclusive. It doubts common sense. It questions the status quo. It tears down regimes of domination. It envisions possibilities for change. Critical storytellers rely on various media and methods. Their stories are critical of metanarratives that are exclusionary and divisive. Critical storytellers voice silences and offer new narratives in their creative work. The Critical Storytelling book series will include diverse storytelling methods, theoretical approaches, and narrative frameworks. We invite collaborative books, edited, and authored, as well as individually written projects. Authors are cordially invited to submit proposals and/or full manuscripts by e-mail to Assistant Editor Evelien van der Veer.
This series addresses the many different forms of exclusion that occur in schooling across a range of international contexts and considers strategies for increasing the inclusion and success of all students. In many school jurisdictions the most reliable predictors of educational failure include poverty, Aboriginality and disability. Traditionally schools have not been pressed to deal with exclusion and failure. Failing students were blamed for their lack of attainment and were either placed in segregated educational settings or encouraged to leave and enter the unskilled labour market. The crisis in the labor market and the call by parents for the inclusion of their children in their neighborhood school has made visible the failure of schools to include all children.
Drawing from a range of researchers and educators from around the world, Studies in Inclusive Education will demonstrate the ways in which schools contribute to the failure of different student identities on the basis of gender, race, language, sexuality, disability, socio-economic status and geographic isolation. This series differs from existing work in inclusive education by expanding the focus from a narrow consideration of what has been traditionally referred to as special educational needs to understand school failure and exclusion in all its forms. Moreover, the series will consider exclusion and inclusion across all sectors of education: early years, elementary and secondary schooling, and higher education.