Browse results

SGG aims to provide an online reference tool for scholars of Greek antiquity, complementary to Jacoby continuatus FGrHist IV. It is designed to bring together a collection of critical editions of the testimonies and fragments of Greek grammatikoi, namely, ancient scholars dealing with textual criticism, literary exegesis, grammar, biography, and the various fields of erudition. Each entry will consist of a biographical and cultural profile of the grammarian and a new (often the first) critical edition of all the extant textual testimonies and sources in their original language, supported by translations and analytical commentaries, and followed by a thorough bibliography and indices. SGG will be published online in this e-book series.

Impact of Empire Online

Roman Empire, c. 200 B.C. – A.D. 476

Various Authors & Editors

This is the digital version of the series Impact of Empire. Publications in the series reflect the aims and scope of the International Network “Impact of Empire (Roman Empire, 2000 BC – AD 476)” which focuses on the consequences of the actions and sheer existence of the Roman Empire in the wide, culturally heterogeneous region it dominated, i.e. a large part of Europe, North Africa and the Middle East. The series publishes the proceedings of the (annual) workshops as well as monographs and collections of essays on this subject.

Edited by John Scarborough, Philip J. van der Eijk, Ann Ellis Hanson and Joseph Ziegler

Studies in Ancient Medicine Online is the electronic version of the series Studies in Ancient Medicine. Studies in Ancient Medicine considers the medical traditions of ancient civilizations. The Graeco-Roman traditions are the focus of the series, but Byzantine, Medieval and early Islamic medicine is also included, as is medicine in Egyptian, Near Eastern, Armenian and other related cultures.

The series is intended for readers with interests in Classics, Ancient History, Ancient Philosophy, Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, History of Medicine and Science, Intellectual History, Byzantium, Islam, as well as for those whose professional involvement in medical practice gives them an interest in the history and traditions of their field.

The series includes monographs, critical editions, translations and commentaries on medical texts and collective volumes on the theory and practice of public and private medicine in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, drawing on written sources and other historical and archaeological evidence. The series also contains annotated bibliographies of published works relevant to particular subfields and lexica of medical terms in the various ancient traditions.

Antike Imperien

Historische und archäologische Untersuchungen

Edited by Peter Eich, Sitta von Reden, Sebastian Schmidt-Hofner and Peter Fibiger Bang

Moving beyond deeply ingrained orientalist and postcolonial paradigms, this series provides a platform for cross-regional, multidisciplinary and longue durée approaches to the cultural history of the Mediterranean, one of the richest and most dynamic intercultural meeting places in the world. Cultural Interactions in the Mediterranean hosts edited volumes and monographs that focus on the connected histories of all those cultures that shaped their identities on both commonalities and differences with others in this region. These identities were negotiated through a variety of social media, such as public rituals and performances, diplomacy, warfare, codified law, literature and material culture, and were applied to a wide range of political, economic and religious goals. The chronological scope of this series ranges from prehistoric times to the present day.

Edited by Gabriele Cornelli and Gábor Betegh

Brill’s Plato Studies Series aims to gather together the most recent and relevant contributions, in order to identify debates and trends within the study of Plato and to provide a holistic understanding of the wide range of issues related to Plato’s philosophy. Of special significance for the series will be the examination of Plato’s literary style and its relationship to his theoretical project as, perhaps, one of the central problems in the study of Plato and Ancient Philosophy as a whole. Even after two thousand years there is still no consensus about why Plato expresses his ideas in such a unique style and the series will aim to address this question. In addition, the Series will warmly welcome contributions focusing on internal and recurrent issues like the relation between myth and philosophy, language, epistemology and ontology in Plato’s work. Special attention will also be given to new interpretative challenges and recent hermeneutical trends, which have emerged from the globalization of current Platonic studies. These new approaches to Plato are likely to change the future frame of Platonic scholarship, providing instruments and renewed impulses for the generations of philosophers to come.

Edited by Luke Lavan

Contributions generally aim to present broad syntheses on topics relating to a specific theme, discussions of key issues, or try to provide summaries of relevant new fieldwork. The volumes address themes relating to the historical reconstruction of Mediterranean society, from the accession of Diocletian (AD 283) to approximately the middle of the 7th century.
Ever since the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, the influence of Plutarch, the great writer of Chaeronea, has been enormous. From Montaigne and Shakespeare to S. Zweig and J.K. Rowling, Plutarch has helped to shape modern Western thought and culture. Besides being an influential figure for intellectual and literary trends, Plutarch has also been fundamental in the transmission of ancient lore to medieval, Renaissance and modern Europe. Indeed, Plutarch is still a key figure for our understanding of the first centuries of the Common Era: his social provenance, education, rich political career and social life make him a first-rate witness to the cultural life of late antiquity.

The past two decades have witnessed an upsurge in scholarship on Plutarch. Classicists, archaeologists, historians, philosophers and theologians alike have shown a renewed interest in this intriguing figure and his works, particularly for the light they might shed on ancient culture. In point of fact, both his Lives and his Moralia are inexhaustible sources of information about numerous aspects of the ancient world and its wisdom, helping scholars as they attempt to reconstruct the past. This is as true for religion, philosophy, literature, politics, and science (botanic, zoology, astronomy, or mathematics), as it is for pseudo-sciences such as divination, astrology, or numerology.

Brill’s Plutarch Studies is a response to this renewed scholarly interest in the encyclopedic writer of Chaeronea. In addition to monographs and edited volumes, the series includes updated [English] translations of and commentaries on both Lives and Moralia. As such, it intends both to bring together the most significant Plutarch scholarship of recent years, as well as to provide a forum in which new approaches might be discussed.
Mnemosyne Supplements (MNS) has existed as a book series for about 80 years, providing a forum for the publication of over 400 scholarly works on all aspects of the Ancient World, including inscriptions, papyri, language, the history of material culture and mentality, the history of peoples and institutions, but also latterly the classical tradition, for example, neo-Latin literature and the history of Classical scholarship.

Mnemosyne Supplements Online includes all volumes until 2017, divided over two collections: the first collection contains all volumes from the beginning in 1938 until 1999 (volumes 1 - 203), and the second collection consists of all the volumes from 2000 up until 2017 (volumes 204-407). The collections include volumes published in MNS subseries History and Archaeology of Classical Antiquity (HACA) and (LAL) as well.
In the post-Enlightenment world, philosophy and religion have come to occupy different, even opposed, domains. But how were they related before this? What were the commonalities and dissimilarities between them? Did they already contain the seeds of their later division – or do they still share enough in common to allow meaningful conversation between them?

This new Brill series “Ancient Philosophy & Religion” provides an interdisciplinary platform for monographs, edited volumes and commentaries on this issue. It is edited by two leading scholars in the fields it brings together, George Boys-Stones (Ancient Philosophy) and George van Kooten (New Testament Studies), and is supported by an editorial board whose members are known for their work in the area. It invites scholars of ancient philosophy, Classics, early Judaism, ancient Judaism, New Testament & early Christianity, and all other relevant fields, to showcase their research on ancient philosophy and religion and to contribute to the debate.

The series’ subject matter is symbolized by its icon, used by courtesy and permission of the New Acropolis Museum in Athens. It represents a dialogue between philosophers, as shown on one of the reliefs of the funeral sacrificial table (mensa) from the “House of Proclus” on the Southern slope of the Acropolis at Athens, excavated in 1955. Dating from 350-325 BC, the reliefs of the mensa depict, after the lamentation and the farewell, the posthumous encounter of the deceased with the philosophers (1950 NAM 90).

The editors very much welcome proposals for monographs, edited volumes and even commentaries on relevant texts.